Infrared Signature Suppression Systems in Modern Military Helicopters

Abstract

Helicopters play an important role in air-to-ground fire covering and the short-distance air-to-air fights, as well as the anti-tank missions and battlefield force transferring. The detection and survivability of helicopters on a battlefield significantly depends on their infrared emissions level, as well as the methods, equipment and systems used by potential enemy. The automatic detection systems, recognition and identification of flying objects use among other the thermo-detection methods, which rely on detecting the infrared radiation emitted by the tracked object. Furthermore, due to low-altitude and relatively low flight speed, today’s combat assets like missile weapons equipped with infrared guidance systems are one of the most important threats to the helicopters performing combat missions. Especially meaningful in a helicopter aviation is infrared emission by exhaust gases, egressed to the surroundings. Due to high temperature, exhaust gases are a major factor in detectability of a helicopter performing air combat operations. In order to increase the combat effectiveness and survivability of military helicopters, several different types of the infrared suppressor (IRS) have been developed. This paper reviews contemporary developments in this discipline, with particular examples of the infrared signature suppression systems.

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

  • [1] Fijałkowski S., 2008, Performance model of turbine engine exhaust cooler in extreme conditions helicopter flights. Part 1. Identification of membranneless exhaust gas cooler interaction with the helicopter turbine engine”, Transactions of the Institute of Aviation 194-195 (in Polish).

  • [2] Fijałkowski S., 2011, The Experiment – Based Analysis of the Infrared Emission by a Helicopter in Flight Transactions of the Institute of Aviation 211 (in Polish).

  • [3] Pan C., Zhang J., Shan Y., 2014, Progress in helicopter infrared signature suppression”, Chinese Journal of Aeronautics 27(2): 189–199.

  • [4] Mahulikar S.P., Rao G.A., Kolhe P.S., 2006, Infrared signatures of low flying aircraft and their rear fuselage skin’s emissivity optimization”, J Aircraft; 43(1): 226–32.

  • [5] Thompson J, Birk AM, Cunningham M., 1999, Design of infrared signature suppressor for the Bell 205 (UH-1H) helicopters, Part I: aerothermal design”, Proceedings of seventh CASI propulsion symposium.

  • [6] Vass S., 2003, Stealth Technology Deployed in battlefield”, AARMS.

  • [7] Zikidis K., Skondras A., Tokas C., 2014, Low Observable Principles, Stealth Aircraft and Anti-Stealth Technologies”, Journal of Computations & Modelling, vol.4, no.1, 129-165.

  • [8] Fijałkowski, S., 2011, Identifying the Behaviour of a Jet Stream in the Environment After Leaving a Helicopter Engine Diffuser in Flight”, Transactions of the Institute of Aviation 219 (in Polish).

  • [9] Fijałkowski S., Kania M., 2011, Numerical Model of Exhaust Gases Expansion in Rotor Wake Vortex During Vertical Helicopter Flight”, Transactions of the Institute of Aviation 221 (in Polish).

  • [10] Pan C., Zhang J., Shan Y., 2014, Effects of rotor downwash on exhaust plume flow and helicopter infrared signature”, Applied Thermal Engineering 65(1–2): 135–149.

  • [11] Groninga K., 2005, “Development and implementation of the H-1 turned exhaust system”, AHS Texas.

  • [12] Fijałkowski S., 2013, The Conditions for Cooling Termovision in the Turbine Engine Propulsion Helicopter in Varied Flight Conditions”, Transactions of the Institute of Aviation 230 (in Polish).

  • [13] Szumański K., 2001, Helicopters tests during extreme tasks”, Transactions of the Institute of Aviation 165-166 (in Polish).

  • [14] Fijałkowski S., The Impact of the Change in the Geometry of an Exhaust Gas Outlet Mainfold on the Operation of a Helicopter Turbine Engine”, Transactions of the Institute of Aviation 219 (in Polish).

  • [15] Fijałkowski S., Wójcik P., 2008, Performance model of turbine engine exhaust cooler in extreme conditions helicopter flights. Part 2. Performence simulation of exhaust cooler in helicopter flight extreme conditions”, Transactions of the Institute of Aviation 194-195 (in Polish).

  • [16] Kuck K., 2005, ,,Commercial Operations and Support Saving Initiative for the OH-58D Kiowa Warrior”, AHS Texas.

  • [17] Barlow B., Petach A., 1977, “Advanced design infrared suppressor for turbo-shaft engines,” Proceedings of the 33rd annual national forum of the American helicopter society.

  • [18] Butowski P., Gruszyński J., Fiszer M., 2006,,, Śmigłowiec bojowy Mi-24”, Wydawnictwo Magnum X, Warszawa.

  • [19] Bonds R., Miller D., 2002, Boeing Sikorsky RAH-66 Comanche”, Illustrated Directory of Modern American Weapons. Grand Rapids, Michigan.

  • [20] Siuru W., Busick J.D., (1993). “Future Flight: The Next Generation of Aircraft Technology”, McGraw-Hill Professional.

  • [21] Internet sources: http://www.aircav.com/cobra/ahgal24/ah1w-070517.htmlhttp://www.richard-seaman.com/Wallpaper/Aircraft/Helicopters/SuperCobraAndWallOfFire1.jpghttp://www.boeing.com/history/products/rah-66-comanche.pagehttp://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/russia/mi-24-pics.htm

OPEN ACCESS

Journal + Issues

Search