Management of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

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Abstract

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a human immune system disease characterized by increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, certain cancers and neurological disorders. The syndrome is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that is transmitted through blood or blood products, sexual contact or contaminated hypodermic needles. Antiretroviral treatment reduces the mortality and the morbidity of HIV infection but is increasingly reported to be associated with increasing reports of metabolic abnormalities. The prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus in patients on antiretroviral therapy is high. Recently, a joint panel of American Diabetes Association (ADA) and European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) experts updated the treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in a consensus statement which provides guidance to health care providers. The ADA and EASD consensus statement concur that intervention in T2DM should be early, intensive, and uncompromisingly focused on maintaining glycemic levels as close as possible to the nondiabetic range. Intensive glucose management has been shown to reduce microvascular complications of diabetes but no significant benefits on cardiovascular diseases. Patients with diabetes have a high risk for cardiovascular disease and the treatment of diabetes should emphasize reduction of the cardiovascular factors risk. The treatment of diabetes mellitus in AIDS patients often involves polypharmacy, which increases the risk of suboptimal adherence

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Romanian Journal of Diabetes Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases

The Journal of Romanian Society of Diabetes Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases

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CiteScore 2017: 0.11

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 0.122
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