Preferences in Meat Consumption of People throughout the Ages Inhabiting the Present—Day Territory of Poland According to Archeaezoological Evidence

Open access

Preferences in Meat Consumption of People throughout the Ages Inhabiting the Present—Day Territory of Poland According to Archeaezoological Evidence

This paper describes meat consumption preferences of people from antiquity inhabiting the territory of present day Poland based on archaeological evidence from the skeletal remains of domestic and wild animals. Much information is provided about meat stocks and the scale of meat consumption by various social groups from these ancient times. Skeleton remains of cattle from the Neolithic period, (estimated in Poland to be around 4600-2100 B.C.), constitute on average from 44.0 to 73.0% of all animal remains found whilst the numbers for swine remains were from 36.9 to 19.0%. Looking at the 8 regions of contemporary Poland then in pre-Roman and Roman periods cattle bone remains ranged from 37.5% in East Pomerania to 80.9% in Central Poland. Those from swine ranged from 42.3 and 11.7%, respectively. In the Middle Ages, (defined as 7-13th century A.D.), cattle bone remains constituted from 30 to 50% and those of swine from 28.0 to 52%. In all of the analysed periods goat/sheep remains amounted to 15%. The skeletal remains of horses during the Roman and pre-Roman periods reached different values in different regions, i.e. from 2.7 in Greater Poland to 11.3% in Silesia however in the Middle Ages they were all below 5%. Fish remains consisting of mainly herring, pike and various other species have been continuously found to be present in the diet of people from Neolithic to the Middle ages.

Nowadays in Poland the annual consumption of pork amounts to 42 kg per capita constituting 57.8% of the total meat consumption (72.7 kg), against only about 5 kg of beef.

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

  • Ammerman A. Cavalli-Sforza L. L. The Neolithic transition and the genetics of population in Europe. 1984 Princeton University Press. Princeston.

  • Barret J. Van Neer W. Ervynck A. Enghoff I. Hufthammer A. K. Amundsen C. Hamilton-Dyer S. Heinrich D. Jones A. Jonsson L. Locker A. Lõugas L. Makowiecki D. Prummel W. Roberts C. Richards M. The origins of intensive sea fishing in the 1st and 2nd millennia AD. 2006 in: Abstracts ICAZ. International Council for Archaeozoology 10th Conference. Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia Escuela Nacional de Conservación Restauración y Museografia. México August 23-28th 2006 pp. 26-27.

  • Benecke N. Bone material of animal from Late Medieval Cone fortified in Dąbrówka. 1986 Roczn. Akadem. Rol. Poznań 172 3-15 (in Polish).

  • Bogucki P. Early Neolithic subsistence and settlement in the Polish lowlands. 1982 British Archaeological Reports. International Series 150. Oxford.

  • Bogucki P. Grygiel R. On the socioeconomic system of European Neolithic populations. Curr. Anthropol. 1980 21 803-804.

  • Bugucki P. Grygiel R. The household cluster at Brześć Kujawski 3. Small-site methodology in the Polish lowlands. World Archaeol. 1981 13 52-72.

  • Chełkowski Z. Filipiak J. Chełkowska B. Studies on ichthyofauna from an archaelogical excavation on Wolin-town (site 1 pit 6). Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria 2001 31 61-80.

  • Daugnora L. Makowiecki D. Dog's life during Roman time on a region of Barbaricum. A palaeopathology study. 2006 in: Abstracts. ICAZ 2006 International Council for Archaeozoology 10th Conference. Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia Escuela Nacional de Conservación Restauración y Museografia. México August 23-28th 2006 p. 57.

  • Dembińska M. Food consumption in Medieval Poland. 1963 Zakład Narodowy im. Ossolińskich PAN Wrocław-Warszawa-Kraków pp. 4-210 (in Polish).

  • Filipiak J. Chełkowski Z. Osteological characteristics of fish remains from early Medieval town of Wolin (site 1 pit 6). Folia Uniwer. Agricult. Stetinensis 2000a 214 Piscaria 27: 55-68.

  • Filipiak J. Chełkowski Z. Osteological characteristics of fish remains from early medieval sedimentary layers of the port in the town of Wolin. Acta Ichthyologic'a et Piscatoria 2000b 30 135-150.

  • Gautier A. Kobusiewicz M. Chwalim 1 a Mesolithic-paraneolithic site in Polish Lowlands: Faunal remains. Fontes Archaeologici Posnanienses 1992 37 65-75.

  • Hodder I. Burials houses women and men in the European Neolithic. 1984 in: Ideology Power and History. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge pp. 51-68.

  • Konopiński T. Bormann J. Rational fattening of pigs. 1932 Poznań Wydawnictwo Wielkopolskiej Izby Rolniczej pp. 1-30 (in Polish).

  • Kossowska B. Zwolińska-Bartczak I. History outline of zootechnic. 1999 Wydawnictwo Akademii Rolniczej we Wrocławiu pp. 107-115 (in Polish).

  • Ludwig A. Arndt U. Debus L. Makowiecki D. Benecke N. What ancient DNA analyses tell us for the present day restoration of Baltic sturgeon. 2006 Abbreviation of lecture ICAZ FRWG. 13th Fish Remains Working Group 13th Meeting October 4-9 Program and Abstracts. ICAZ International Council for Archaeozoology p. 6.

  • Makowiecki D. Chosen problems from the study on animal economy in the early Middle Ages complex of settlements of Pomerania Great Polish and Low Silesia. 2006a in: Stan i potrzeby badań nad wczesnym średniowieczem w Polsce - 15 lat później (eds. W. Chudziak S. Moździoch). UMK Toruń UW Wrocław- UW Warszawa pp. 123-150 (in Polish).

  • Makowiecki D. The cod helps to understand the history. 2006b [ www.eduskrypt.pl/index.php?

  • Makowiecki D. Some aspects of Medieval fishery on the Polish Lowlands. Przegl. Ryb. 2001 26 4 74-82 (in Polish).

  • Marciniak A. Interactions between hunter-gatherers and farmers in the Early and Middle Neolithic in the Polish part of the North European Plain. 2008 in: Time and Change. Archaeological and Anthropological Perspectives on the Long-Term in Hunter-Gatherer Societies (eds. D. Papagianni R. Laytoneds.). Oxbow Oxford. pp. 115-133.

  • Marciniak A. Placing animals in the Neolithic social zoo-archaeology of prehistoric farming communities. 2005 UCL Press London p. 279.

  • Pollard J. These places have their moments. Thoughts on settlement practices in the British Neolithic Making places in the prehistoric of world. 1999 in: Themes in Settlement Archaeology (eds. I. J. Brück M. Goodman) UCL Press. London pp. 76-93.

  • Price T. D. Gebauer A. B. Keeley L.H Spread of farming into North Europe of the Alps. 1996 in: Last Hunters - First Farmers. New perspectives on the prehistoric transition to agriculture (eds. T. D. Price A. B. Gebauer) School of American Research Press Santa Fe New Mexico pp. 95-126.

  • Prost E. K. Slaughter animals - before and today. Pol. J. Food Nutr. Sci. 2001 10/51(Suppl.) 3 5.

  • Statistical Yearbook of Poland Główny Urząd Statystyczny. 2008 LXVIII Warszawa (in Polish).

  • Sobociński M. Bone remains from settlements of people of ceramics gibbon culture on Kujawa Region. Roczn. Akad. Roln. Poznań Archeozoologia 1985 10 87-128 (in Polish).

  • Starling N. J. Neolithic settlement patterns in Central Germany. Oxford Archaeol. 1983 2 1 1-12.

  • Wielowiejski J. Makiewicz T. Late Latin and Roman periods 5. Production 6. Consumption. 1981 in: Prahistoria ziem polskich (ed. T. Wielowiejski). V PAN Wrocław-Warszawa- Kraków-Gdańsk Ossolineum pp. 315-382 (in Polish).

  • Wiślański T. Neoliht. 1979 in: Prahistory of Polish lands. (eds. W. Hensel T. Wiślański). II PAN Wrocław-Warszawa- Kraków-Gdańsk Ossolineum pp. 11-71 (in Polish).

  • Zbierski A. Ichthylogical studies on fishing in Gdańsk in the 9th-11th centuries based on archaeological materials from Pomerania. Archaelogia Polona 1976 17 247-255.

Search
Journal information
Impact Factor


IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 1.697
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 1.760



CiteScore 2018: 1.92

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.621
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.908

Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 139 38 0
PDF Downloads 58 15 0