Preliminary Reflection on Content and Language Integrated Learning as a Tool for Teaching English in a Globalised World

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Abstract

CLIL has become synonymous with teaching English to non-specialist students in professional and academic (ex. universities) contexts. However, it should not be seen as a unique approach that could be applied to any situation. The present reflection aims to emphasise the importance of social and educational contexts in the shaping of CLIL as a tool for both research and teaching, as a research question. It proposes a plan for research that needs to be collaborative and comparative in its objectives and methodology (action research), which will be followed by the presentation of the expected outcomes.

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