Meloidogyne luci, a new infecting nematode species on common bean fields at Paraná State, Brazil

Open access

Summary

Common bean diseased plants with symptoms of decline and root knots were collected in two growing areas in the municipality of Araucária, Paraná State (Brazil). Morphological (perineal patterns), biochemical (esterase phenotypes) and molecular (ITS1 sequences) studies allowed us to identify the infecting nematode as Meloidogyne luci. To our knowledge, this is the first formal record of M. luci parasitizing common bean in Paraná State, Brazil.

Introduction

Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is one of the most important crops in Brazil and worldwide (FAO, 2015). Brazil is the second largest producer of the world and the main producer of beans in the Americas, with a total production of 3,435,370 t in approximately 3,152.917 ha (IBGE, 2013).

There are numerous limiting factors to common bean production, among them the phytonematodes occurrence. This plant species is usually infected by many nematode species, but Meloidogyne spp. (i.e. M. incognita, M. javanica and M. arenaria) are responsible for great damage worldwide (Sikora et al., 2005). These nematodes reduce the quality of vegetables and cause yield losses around 50 to 80 % per annum worldwide (Moens et al 2009; Siddiqi, 2000). Beyond these most common root-knot species, currently, other species have been cited damaging P. vulgaris around the world, as M. enterolobii, M. chitwood, M. hapla and M. brasiliensis (Brito et al 2003a,b; Hafez & Sundararaj, 1999; Charchar & Eisenback, 2002). Meloidogyne luci was detected on P. vulgaris in Distrito Federal, Brazil, but no damages were reported (Carneiro et al., 2008). Common bean plants collected on the municipality of Araucária, Paraná State, Brazil, showed symptoms of decline and stunting.

Roots showed clearly visible galls and egg masses. Therefore, we aimed to identify the infecting nematode species with the integration of morphological, biochemical and molecular approaches.

Materials and Methods

During a survey of nematode species on common bean fields in Paraná State, Brazil, galled root samples of cultivarTuiuiú (Fig.1A) were sent, in June 2012, to the Nematology Laboratory from IA-PAR, Instituto Agronômico do Paraná, collected in the municipality of Araucária (25°35'34"S, 49°24'36"W). Roots were washed with tap water and adult females were extracted from dissected roots; after, the extraction of nematodes was carried out according to Boneti and Ferraz (1981). Then, nematode population was estimated.

Fig.1
Fig.1

Common bean roots showing natural galls caused by Meloidogyne luci (A), perineal pattern ofM. luci(B) and esterase phenotype of M. luci detected in common bean (L3: M. luci from Araucária, PR; L3*: M. luci reference isolate; J3*: M. javanica reference isolate) (C)

Citation: Helminthologia 53, 2; 10.1515/helmin-2016-0014

The specimens were identified through perineal patterns (Hartman & Sasser, 1985) and esterase phenotypes of 20 adult females extracted from dissected roots. Esterase phenotypes were determined using protein extract from one young egg-laying female for each reaction. For this purpose, females were placed in a hema-tocrit containing 5μl of extraction solution (Carneiro et al., 2000), macerated and transferred to 7 % polyacrylamide gel slabs. Homogenates of the isolate IPR 81 of M. javanica (Mj) (J3; Rm 1.0, 1.3 and 1.4) was our reference. Electrophoresis was performed according to Brito et al. (2004) using a Omniphor (Biosystems) equipment, at 4 °C, under constant voltage of 100 V for 15 min and 200 V for 30 min. Gel was stained for esterase activity using the α-naphtyl acetate substrate.

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was also performed on females partially dissected from the roots. After dissection step, samples were transferred to glass vials containing 2 mL of Karno-vsky fixative solution [2.5 % v v-1 glutaraldehyde and 2.5 % v v-1 paraformaldehyde in 0.05 M sodium cacodylate buffer + 0.001 M calcium chloride, pH 7.0] and stored at 4 °C. Samples were post-fixed in osmium tetroxide 1 % for 2h at 25 °C, and then dehydrated in a graded acetone series (30, 50, 70, 90 and 100 %) and dried to the critical point in CO2 (Bal-tec CPD 030; Balzers, Germany). Root tissues were mounted on aluminium stubs, sputter coated with gold (Bal-tec SCD 050; Balzers, Germany) and examined in SEM (LEO-435 VP, Cambridge, England) operating at 20 kV with a working distance ranging from 10 to 30 mm.

Genomic DNA was obtained according to NaOH method (Stan-ton et al., 1998). Amplification of the 18S-ITS1-28S region of ri-bosomal DNA was performed using the Kit Taq PCR Master Mix (Promega) and the nematode universal primers rDNA2 (5'-TT-GATTACGTCCCTGCCCTTT-3') and rDNA1.58S (5'-ACGAGC-CGAGTGATCCACCG-3'). In a microcentrifuge tube were added 25μl of the Kit Taq PCR Master Mix, 1.5μl (0.3 microM) from each primer, 18μl water mili-Q and 4μl total DNA. The DNA was subjected to a PCR with the following specifications: 94 °C (2 min); followed by 40 cycles at 94 °C (1 min), 57 °C (1 min) and 72 °C (2 min) (Cherry et al., 1997).

DNA sequences were analyzed using BLASTn megablast (http:// www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/blast/Blast.cgi) and deposited in GenBank (KP165404 and KP165405). The ITS1 sequences were aligned using CLUSTAL W (Tompson et al., 1997). Dendrogram was obtained by MEGA6.06 (Tamura etal 2013). Model with lowest BIC (Bayesian Information Criterion) scores was considered to describe the substitution pattern. Then, a phylogenetic tree was constructed using Maximum Likelihood with Kimura 2-parameter model (Gamma distribution) and complete deletion (1,000 replicates). Meloidogyne hapla (KJ572385.1) was used as outgroup taxa.

Fig.2
Fig.2

Phylogenetic tree (Maximum Likelihood) resulting from alignment of the partial sequences of the 18S-ITS1-5.8S of populations of Meloidogyne spp. Bootstrap values were obtained from 1,000 replicates. Populations isolated from common bean plants are indicated by KP165404 and KP165405

Citation: Helminthologia 53, 2; 10.1515/helmin-2016-0014

Results and Discussion

The population density in the samples was 82 nematodes per gram of roots. Characters observed on both perineal patterns and biochemical analysis were consistent with those described for M. luci. Females showed an oval to squarish perineal pattern with a low to moderately high dorsal arc and without shoulders (Fig.1B) (Carneiro etal 2014). Biochemically, we obtained L3 (Rm 1.05, 1.10, 1.25) esterase phenotypes, unique trait for M. luci (Fig.1C) (Carneiro et al., 2014).

In relation to ITS1 sequences, amplicons of 376 and 417 pb in length obtained showed 97 % and 99 % identity with known sequences of M. luci (accession number KF482363.1 and KF482364.1). Phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood of those sequences placed our Meloidogyne isolate in a clade (90 % bootstrap support) which included only M. luci sequences available in the GenBank database, thus confirming its identity (Fig.2). To our knowledge, this is the first report of M. luci parasitizing common bean in Paraná State; previously, it was associated with bean in Braslândia, Distrito Federal, Brazil (Carneiro et al., 2013). In general way, common bean is a good host for the major species of Meloidogyne; now, this species is included as a new concern for growers and technicians. Additional studies should be conducted in order to determine its distribution and estimates of damage.

Acknowledgments

JVAF thank CNPq (National Council for Scientific and Technological Development) for their academic grant.

References

  • Boneti J.I Ferraz S 1981 Modificações no método de Hussey & Barker para Extração de ovos de Meloidogyne exigua em raízes de cafeeiro Fitopatol. Bras . 6 533

  • Brito J Inserra R Lehman P Dixon W 2003a The root knot nematode Meloidogyne mayaguensis Rammah and Hirschmann 1988 (Nematoda: Tylenchida) In: Pest Alert Website of Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer service Division of Plant Industry Gainesville FloridaRetrieved from www.doacs.state. fl.us/~pi/enpp/nema/mayaguensis.html

  • Brito J Stanley J.D Mendes M.L Dickson D.W 2003b Host status of selected plant species to Meloidogyne mayaguensis from Florida In Abstracts of XXXV Annual Meeting of Organization of Nematologists of Tropical America 21 - 25 July Guayaquil Ecuador p13

  • Brito J.A . Powers T.O Mullin P.G Inserra R.N Dickson D.W 2004 Morphological and molecular characterization of Meloidogyne mayaguensis isolates from Florida J. Nematol36232-240

  • Carneiro R.M.D.G Almeida M.R.A Quénéhervé P 2000 Enzyme phenotypes of Meloidogyne spp. populations Nematology2645-654> 10.1163/156854100509510

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Carneiro R.M.D.G Almeida M.R.A Martins I Freitas J Pires A.Q Tigano M 2008 Ocorrência de Meloidogyne spp. e fungos nematófagos em hortaliçasno Distrito Federal Brasil Nematol. Bras 32135-141

  • Carneiro R.M.D.G Correa V.R Almeida M.R.A Gomes A.C.M.M Deimi A.M Castagnone-Sereno P Karssen G 2014 Meloidogyne luci n. sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae) a root-knot nematode parasitising different crops in BrazilChile and Iran Nematology 16289-301 10.1163/15685411-00002765

  • Charchar J.M Eisenback J.D 2002 Meloidogyne brasiliensis n.sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae) a root knot nematode parasitising tomato cvRossol in Brazil Nematology 4629-643

  • Cherry T Szalanski A.L Todd T.C Powers T.O 1997 The internal transcribed spacer region of Belonolaimus (Nemata: Belo-nolaimidae) J. Nematol2923-29

  • Fao: Food And Agriculture Organization Of The United Nations 2015 In: Secretaria de Estado da Agricultura e do Abastecimen to Feijão Análise da Conjuntura Agropecuária

  • Hafez S.L Sundararaj P 1999 Screening of commercial cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris against Meloidogyne chitwood and M. hapla Int. J. Nemato l9 163-167

  • Hartman K.M Sasser J.N 1985 Identification of Meloidogyne species on the basis of differential host and perineal pattern morphology In Barker K.R Carter C.C Sasser J.N (Eds). An advanced treatise on Meloidogyne. Volume II Methodology. Raleigh: North Carolina State University Graphics pp115-123

  • Ibge: Instituto Brasileiro De Geografia E Estatística 2013 Levantamento Systemático da Produção agrícola v. 26 n. 2 p 1-84

  • Moens M Perry R . Starr J.L 2009 Meloidogyne species a diverse group of novel and important plant parasites In Root Knot NematodesWallingford UK CABI Publishing CAB International

  • Siddiqi M.R 2000 Tylenchida Parasites of Plants and Insects 2nd ednWallingford UK CABI Publishing CAB International

  • Sikora R.A GReco N Silva J.F.V 2005 Nematode parasites of food legumes In LUC M Sikora R.A Bridge J (Eds) Plant parasitic nematodes in subtropical and tropical agriculture. CAB Publishing Wallingford USA 259-318

  • Stanton J.M Mcnicol C.D Steele V 1998 Non-manual lysis of second-stage Meloidogyne juveniles for identification of pure and mixed samples based on the polymerase chain reaction Aus-tralas. Plant Pathol27112-115 10.1071/AP98014

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Tamura K Stecher G Peterson D Filipski A Kumar S 2013 Mega 6: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis Version 6.0. Mol. Biol. Evol 282725-2729 10.1093/molbev/msr121

  • Tompson J.D Higgins D.G Gibson T.J 1994 CLUSTALW: improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence weighting position-specific gap penalties and weight matrix choice Nucleic Acids Res224673-4680 10.1093/nar/22.22.4673

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

  • Boneti J.I Ferraz S 1981 Modificações no método de Hussey & Barker para Extração de ovos de Meloidogyne exigua em raízes de cafeeiro Fitopatol. Bras . 6 533

  • Brito J Inserra R Lehman P Dixon W 2003a The root knot nematode Meloidogyne mayaguensis Rammah and Hirschmann 1988 (Nematoda: Tylenchida) In: Pest Alert Website of Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer service Division of Plant Industry Gainesville FloridaRetrieved from www.doacs.state. fl.us/~pi/enpp/nema/mayaguensis.html

  • Brito J Stanley J.D Mendes M.L Dickson D.W 2003b Host status of selected plant species to Meloidogyne mayaguensis from Florida In Abstracts of XXXV Annual Meeting of Organization of Nematologists of Tropical America 21 - 25 July Guayaquil Ecuador p13

  • Brito J.A . Powers T.O Mullin P.G Inserra R.N Dickson D.W 2004 Morphological and molecular characterization of Meloidogyne mayaguensis isolates from Florida J. Nematol36232-240

  • Carneiro R.M.D.G Almeida M.R.A Quénéhervé P 2000 Enzyme phenotypes of Meloidogyne spp. populations Nematology2645-654> 10.1163/156854100509510

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Carneiro R.M.D.G Almeida M.R.A Martins I Freitas J Pires A.Q Tigano M 2008 Ocorrência de Meloidogyne spp. e fungos nematófagos em hortaliçasno Distrito Federal Brasil Nematol. Bras 32135-141

  • Carneiro R.M.D.G Correa V.R Almeida M.R.A Gomes A.C.M.M Deimi A.M Castagnone-Sereno P Karssen G 2014 Meloidogyne luci n. sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae) a root-knot nematode parasitising different crops in BrazilChile and Iran Nematology 16289-301 10.1163/15685411-00002765

  • Charchar J.M Eisenback J.D 2002 Meloidogyne brasiliensis n.sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae) a root knot nematode parasitising tomato cvRossol in Brazil Nematology 4629-643

  • Cherry T Szalanski A.L Todd T.C Powers T.O 1997 The internal transcribed spacer region of Belonolaimus (Nemata: Belo-nolaimidae) J. Nematol2923-29

  • Fao: Food And Agriculture Organization Of The United Nations 2015 In: Secretaria de Estado da Agricultura e do Abastecimen to Feijão Análise da Conjuntura Agropecuária

  • Hafez S.L Sundararaj P 1999 Screening of commercial cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris against Meloidogyne chitwood and M. hapla Int. J. Nemato l9 163-167

  • Hartman K.M Sasser J.N 1985 Identification of Meloidogyne species on the basis of differential host and perineal pattern morphology In Barker K.R Carter C.C Sasser J.N (Eds). An advanced treatise on Meloidogyne. Volume II Methodology. Raleigh: North Carolina State University Graphics pp115-123

  • Ibge: Instituto Brasileiro De Geografia E Estatística 2013 Levantamento Systemático da Produção agrícola v. 26 n. 2 p 1-84

  • Moens M Perry R . Starr J.L 2009 Meloidogyne species a diverse group of novel and important plant parasites In Root Knot NematodesWallingford UK CABI Publishing CAB International

  • Siddiqi M.R 2000 Tylenchida Parasites of Plants and Insects 2nd ednWallingford UK CABI Publishing CAB International

  • Sikora R.A GReco N Silva J.F.V 2005 Nematode parasites of food legumes In LUC M Sikora R.A Bridge J (Eds) Plant parasitic nematodes in subtropical and tropical agriculture. CAB Publishing Wallingford USA 259-318

  • Stanton J.M Mcnicol C.D Steele V 1998 Non-manual lysis of second-stage Meloidogyne juveniles for identification of pure and mixed samples based on the polymerase chain reaction Aus-tralas. Plant Pathol27112-115 10.1071/AP98014

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Tamura K Stecher G Peterson D Filipski A Kumar S 2013 Mega 6: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis Version 6.0. Mol. Biol. Evol 282725-2729 10.1093/molbev/msr121

  • Tompson J.D Higgins D.G Gibson T.J 1994 CLUSTALW: improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence weighting position-specific gap penalties and weight matrix choice Nucleic Acids Res224673-4680 10.1093/nar/22.22.4673

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
Search
Journal information
Impact Factor

IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 0.731
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 0.634

CiteScore 2018: 0.8

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.398
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.554

Target audience: researchers in the field of human, veterinary medicine and natural science
Figures
  • View in gallery

    Common bean roots showing natural galls caused by Meloidogyne luci (A), perineal pattern ofM. luci(B) and esterase phenotype of M. luci detected in common bean (L3: M. luci from Araucária, PR; L3*: M. luci reference isolate; J3*: M. javanica reference isolate) (C)

  • View in gallery

    Phylogenetic tree (Maximum Likelihood) resulting from alignment of the partial sequences of the 18S-ITS1-5.8S of populations of Meloidogyne spp. Bootstrap values were obtained from 1,000 replicates. Populations isolated from common bean plants are indicated by KP165404 and KP165405

Cited By
Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 620 291 9
PDF Downloads 159 65 1