Is Environmental Racism Truly Racist?

Kristián Čechmánek 1
  • 1 Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, , Slovakia

Abstract

The paper aims to critically analyse the theory of environmental racism as a part of the concept of environmental justice in order to point out possible overuse of the term racism. Through theoretical analysis, the author tries to prove that labelling any negative impacts of the environmental burden on racial or ethnic minorities with racism is an unnecessary overwork which moreover might be, according to available data, inconsistent with reality.

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