Measurements of Galvanic Skin Response on Subjects Affected by Stress

Loredana Cristina Dascălu 1 , Claudiu Babiș 2 , Oana Chivu 3 , Gabriel Iacobescu 4 , Ana Maria Alecusan 5 ,  and Augustin Semenescu 6
  • 1 Welding and Material Technology Department, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania
  • 2 Welding and Material Technology Department, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania
  • 3 Welding and Material Technology Department, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania
  • 4 Welding and Material Technology Department, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania
  • 5 Theory of Mechanisms and Robots Department, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania
  • 6 Economics Engineering Department, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania

Abstract

The aim of the present paper is to study the Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) level on subjects affected by stress. The device that we have used, connects to the people by finger electrodes to record GSR. The purpose was to find statistical differences between the activities (mental task, walking, sitting and to fill out a survey about their lives) and their stress level. During the experiment, it was found that the survey caused the source of high stress and increasing skin conductance was caused by sweat secretion (mental, physical activity). Is needed to work of collecting data from more subjects because GSR is depended on human behaviour, is variable upon many factors (their eating habits, their emotional state, their gender, their relationship with family, etc) and we need to build a substantial data set for a valid research.

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