Spectacles and Embroidered Spectacle Cases from China in the Náprstek Museum

Open access

Abstract

Spectacles from China appear in many museum collections, and they are popular collectibles in private collections. The collection of ten spectacles and their cases in the Náprstek Museum in Prague shows its technological and material development from the pince-nez type in the second half of the 19th century to early 20th century tortoiseshell and plastic spectacles. As signs of learning, these different types of spectacles and their cases show their social context and meaning in Chinese society during the transition period from the traditional to the modern era.

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

  • Agarwal Rishi Kumar 1971 “Origin of spectacles in India.“ British Journal of Ophthalmology Vol. 55 No. 2 pp. 128–129.

  • Bertolucci Bernardo director 1987 The Last Emperor. Hemdale Film Corporation.

  • Bock Emil 1903 Die Brille and ihre Geschichte. Wien: Josef Šafář.

  • Chen Kaijun 2018 “Transcultural Lenses: Wrapping the Foreignness for Sale in the History of Lenses.“ In Grasskamp Anna and Monica Juneja eds. China Europe and the Transcultural Object 1600-1800. Springer pp. 77–98.

  • Chiu Kaiming 1936 “The Introduction of Spectacles Into China.“ Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies Vol. 1 No. 2 pp. 186–193.

  • Davis John Francis 1836 The Chinese: A General Description of the Empire of China and Its Inhabitants. C. Knight.

  • Dikkötter Frank 2006 Exotic Commodities: Modern Objects and Everyday Life in China. Columbia University Press.

  • Finnane Antonia 2008 Changing Clothes in China. Fashion History Nation. Columbia University Press.

  • Garret Valery 2001 M. A Collector´s Guide to Chinese Dress Accessories. Times Editions.

  • Finlay Robert 2000 “China the West and World History in Joseph Needham’s Science and Civilisation in China.“ Journal of World History No. 11 pp. 265–303.

  • Heroldová Helena 2017 Between Cultures: Manchu and Han Dress during the Late Qing. Praha: Národní muzeum.

  • 2011 The Exotic Salon of the Master of the House: The History of the Václav Stejskal Collection. Praha: Národní Muzeum.

  • Heroldová Helena – Jiřina Todorovová 2018 “A Family Portrait: E. S. Vraz and the Qing Aristocracy during the Boxer Rebellion.“ Annals of the Náprstek Museum Vol. 39 No. 1 pp. 51–74.

  • Jackson Beverley 2005 Shanghai Girl Gets All Dressed Up. Berkeley: Ten Speed Press.

  • Kraemerová Alice – Jan Šejbl 2007 Japonsko má láska: český cestovatel a sběratel Joe Hloucha. Praha: Národní muzeum.

  • Lackner Michael – Natascha Vittinghoff (eds.) 2004 Mapping Meaning: The Field of New Learning in Late Qing China. Brill.

  • Laufer Berthold 1907 “Zur Geschichte der Brille.“ Mitteilungen zur Geschichte der Medizin und der Naturwissenschaften Vol. 6 No. 4 pp. 379–385.

  • Mazor Amir – Keren Abbou Hershkovits 2013 “Spectacles in the Muslim World: New Evidence from the Mid-Fourteenth Century.“ Early Science and Medicine Vol. 18 No. 3 pp. 291–305.

  • Needham Joseph 1962 Science and Civilisation in China. Vol. IV. Physics and physical Technology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2004.

  • Aisin-Gioro Puyi 1965 From Emperor to Citizen: Autobiography of Aisin-Gioro Pu Yi Volume 1. Beijing: Foreign Language Press.

  • Rasmussen Otto Durham 1915 Old Chinese Spectacles. Tientsin: North China Press.

  • Rosenthal William J 1996 Spectacles and Other Vision Aids: A History and Guide to Collecting. San Francisco: Norman Publishing.

  • Welch Patricia Bjaaland 2008 Chinese Art. A Guide to Motifs and Visual Imagery. Tuttle Publishing.

  • Wright David 2000 Translating Science: The Transmission of Western Chemistry into Late Imperial China 1840-1900. Brill.

Search
Journal information
Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 14 14 4
PDF Downloads 13 13 5