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P. Skubisz, A. Żak, M. Burdek, Ł. Lisiecki and P. Micek

Products of Microalloyed Constructional Steels, J. Arch. Mater. Manuf. Eng. 15 , 153-158 (2006). [5] M. Opiela, Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on the Mi-crostructure and Mechanical Properties of Nb-Ti-V Microal-loyed Steel, J. Mat. Eng. Perf. 23 , 3379-3388 (2014). [6] J. Majta, J.G. Lenard, M. Pietrzyk, A study of the effect of the thermomechanical history on the mechanical properties of a high niobium steel, Mat. Sci. Eng. 4208 , 249-259 (1996). [7] M.L.N. da Silva, W. Regone, S.T. Button, Microstructure and mechanical properties of microalloyed steel

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M. Kwiecień, P. Graca, K. Muszka and J. Majta

REFERENCES [1] N. Murty, S. Torizuka, Mater. Sci. Forum 633-634 , 211-221 (2010). [2] H.S. Zurob, C.R. Hutchinson, Y. Brechet, G. Purdy, Acta Mater. 50 , 3075-3092 (2002). [3] B. Santillana, D.G. Eskin, R. Boom, L. Katgerman, Mater. Sci. Eng. 27 , 1-6 (2011). [4] A.G Kostryzhev, C.D. Slater, O.O. Marenych, C.L. Davis, Scientific Reports 6 (2016). [5] J.S. Ha, J.R. Cho, B.Y. Lee, M. Y. Ha, J. Mater. Process. Technol. 113 (1), 257-261 (2001). [6] K. Miłkowska-Piszczek, J. Falkus, METABK 53 , 571-573 (2014). [7] S

Open access

J. Górka

References [1] K. Nishioka, K. Ichikawa, Progress in termomechanical control of steel plates and their commercialization, Science and Technology of Advanced Materials 13 (2), 1-20 (2012). [2] A. Lisiecki, Titanium Matrix Composite Ti/TiN Produced by Diode Laser Gas Nitriding, Metals 5(1), 54-69 (2015), doi: 10.3390/ met5010054. [3] A. Grajcar, K. Radwański., H. Krztoń , Microstructural analysis of a thermomechanically processed Si-Al TRIP steel characterized by EBSD and X-ray techniques, Solid State Phenomena

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M. Soliman, H. Palkowski and A. Nofal

. Yamada, Metall. Mater. Trans. A 27, 1961-1971 (Jul. 1996). [6] N. Wade, C. Lu, Y. Ueda, T. Maeda, Trans. Japn. Foundarymen‘s Soc. 4, 22-26 (Apr. 1985). [7] G.E. Dieter, H.A. Kuhn and S.L. Semiatin, Handbook of Workability and Process Design, 2003 USA. [8] M. Soliman, H. Palkowski, A. Nofal, Key Eng. Mater. 457, 199-204 (2011). [9] M. Soliman, A. Nofal, H. Palkowski, Alloy and process design of thermo-mechanically processed multiphase ductile iron, Materials and Design 87, 450-465 (2015

Open access

K. Sołek and L. Trębacz

References Website http://www.esi-group.com/products/casting/procast Y.-C. Wang, D.-Y. Li, Y.-H. Peng, L.-G. Zhu, Computational modeling and control system of continuous casting process, International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 33(1), 1-6 (2007). M. Rywotycki, K. Miłkowska-Piszczek, L. Trębacz, Identification of the boundary conditions in the continuous casting of steel, Proc. 5th Int. Conf. Ciągłe Odlewanie Stali, 106-113 Krynica 2011

Open access

M. Hojny

References [1] D. Wozniak, M. Głowacki, M. Hojn y, T. Piej a, Application of CAEsystems in forming of drawpieces with use rubber-pad forming process, Archives of Metallurgy and Materials 57, 1179 (2012). [2] Z. Malinowski, M. Rywotyck i, Modelling of the strand and mold temperature in the continuous steel caster, Archives of Metallurgy and Materials 9, 59 (2009). [3] M. Hojny, Application of an integrated CAD/CAM/CAE/IBCsystem in the stamping process ofabathtub 1200S, Archives of Metallurgy and Materials

Open access

A. Szkliniarz

Abstract

This paper presents the possibilities of forming the microstructure as well as mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of Cu-3Ti alloy (wt.%) in thermal and thermomechanical processes that are a combination of homogenising treatment, hot and cold working, solution treatment and ageing. Phase composition of the alloy following various stages of processing it into the specified semi-finished product was being determined too. It was demonstrated that the application of cold plastic deformation between solution treatment and ageing could significantly enhance the effect of hardening of the Cu-3Ti alloy without deteriorating its electrical conductivity. It was found that for the investigated alloy the selection of appropriate conditions for homogenising treatment, hot and cold deformation as well as solution treatment and ageing enables to obtain the properties comparable to those of beryllium bronzes.

Open access

T. Tokarski

Abstract

Aluminium-magnesium 5083 alloy was rapidly solidified by means of melt spinning technique and plastically consolidated during subsequent hot extrusion process. As a result, rods 8 mm in diameter were obtained. Structure of as-extruded material is characterized by ultra-fined grains, which influences on increasement of mechanical properties of the material. The strengthening effect was further enhanced by application of thermo-mechanical treatment consist of cold rolling combined with isothermal annealing. As a result, reduction of grain size from ∼710 nm to ∼270 nm as well as enhancement of yield stress (330 MPa to 420 MPa) and ultimate tensile strength (410 MPa to 460 MPa) were achieved. Based on received results Hall-Petch coefficients (σ0, k) for 5083 RS material were determined.

Open access

A. Kulawik

References [1] K.J. Lee, Characteristics of heat generation during transformation in carbon steels, Scripta Materialia 40 , 735-742 (1999). [2] J.L. Lee, J.K. Ch eny, Y.T. Pan, K.C. Hsieh, Evaluation of transformation latent heat in C-Mn steels, ISIJ International 39 , 281-287 (1999). [3] E.P Silva, P.M.C.L. Pacheco, M.A. Savi, On the thermo-mechanical coupling in austenite-martensite phase transformation related to the quenching process, International Journal of Solids and Structures 41 , 1139

Open access

S.M. Abbasi, A. Momeni, M. Daraee, A. Akhondzadeh and S.G. Mirsaeed

Abstract

Hot tensile tests were carried out on Timetal-125 and Timetal-LCB near beta Ti alloys at temperatures in range of 600-1000°C and constant strain rate of 0.1 s−1. At temperatures below 700-800°C, the homogenuous and total strains for Timetal-LCB were greater than those for Timetal-125. In contrast, at temperatures over 800°C, Timetal-125 showed better hot ductility. The yield point phenomena was observed in Timetal-LCB at all temperatures. Unlikely, for Timetal-125, it was observed only at temperatures over 800°C. The weaker yield point phenomena in Timetal-125 could be attributed to the negative effect of Al on the diffusion of V. At all temperatures Timetal-LCB exhibited higher strength than Timetal-125. It was found that there should be a direct relationship between the extent of yield point phenomena and strength and dynamic softening through hot tensile testing. It was observed that at temperatures beyond 800°C (beta phase field in both alloys) dynamic recrystallization can progress more in Timetal-125 than in Timetal-LCB. These results were in good agreement with the better hot ductility of Timetal-125 at high temperatures. At low temperatures, i.e. below 700-800°C, partial dynamic recrystallization occurs in beta and dynamic globularization in alpha phase. These processes progress more in Timetal-LCB than in Timetal-125.