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Ana Cristina Băniceru

Abstract

The main concern of a skilled storyteller is not to report a sequence of events, but to tell a ‘tellable’ story and to ward off the question ‘so what?’ coming from the listener. However, what happens when the story has little to recommend it as ‘tellable’? This is the case of Tristram Shandy who uses sexuality as elaborate rhetorical strategy to constantly tease and arouse his narratees’ imagination.

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Bogusław Maciejewski

To Tell or not to Tell the Truth to Cancer Patients

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Jennifer Saul

Abstract

As the phenomenon of implicit bias has become increasingly widely known and accepted, a variety of criticisms have similarly gained in prominence. This paper focuses on one particular set of criticisms, generally made from the political left, of what Sally Haslanger calls “implicit bias stories”—a broad term encompassing a wide range of discourses from media discussions to academic papers to implicit bias training. According to this line of thought, implicit bias stories are counterproductive because they serve to distract from the structural and institutional factors that underlie oppression of social groups. This paper argues on the contrary that implicit bias stories, properly told, can help direct attention and concern to structural and institutional factors, and indeed may be especially helpful in motiving action. The key, however, is to tell these stories properly. When implicit bias sto- ries are told in the wrong way, they are indeed counterproductive. This paper looks in detail at several examples of good and bad implicit bias stories, examining what makes some of them counterproductive and others highly effective in motivating action to combat social injustice.

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Jerzy Trzciński, Małgorzata Zaremba, Sławomir Rzepka, Witold Bogusz, Tomasz Godlewski and Tomasz Szczepański

REFERENCES Arnold, D., 2001. The Encyclopaedia of Ancient Egyptian Architecture, London – New York. Emery, V.L., 2011. Mud-Brick Architecture. In: Wendrich, W. (Ed.), UCLA Encyclopaedia of Egyptology, Los Angeles. Górka, K., Rzepka, S., 2011. Infant burials or infant sacrifices? New Discoveries from Tell el-Retaba. Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts Kairo 67, 93–100. Hölscher, U., 1951. The Excavation of Medinet Habu, Volume IV. The Mortuary Temple of Ramses III, Part II, Chicago. Kemp, B., 2009. Soil (including mud

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Krystyna Wasylikowa and Rafał Koliński

References BOULOS L. 1999. Flora of Egypt. vol. 1. Al Hadara Publishing, Cairo. BUTLER A. 1996. Trifolieae and related seeds from archaeological contexts: problems in identification. Veget. Hist. Archaeobot., 5: 157-167. BUURMAN J. 1998/1999. Archaeobotanical investigations of a Middle and Late Bronze Age settlement site at Westwoud (West-Friesland). Ber. Rijksd. Oudheidk. Bodenmon., 43: 99-139. CHARLES M. & BOGAA RD A. 2001. Third millennium BC charred plant remains from Tell Brak: 301

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Jerzy Trzciński, Małgorzata Zaremba, Sławomir Rzepka, Fabian Welc and Tomasz Szczepański

Discoveries from Tell el-Retaba. Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts Kairo 67, 93–100. Hayes, W.C., 1965. Most Ancient Egypt. Chicago and London. Univ. Chicago Press. Kaczyński, R., 1981. The strength and deformability of the Upper Miocene clays Foredeep (Wytrzymałość i odkształcalność górno mioceńskich iłów zapadliska przedkarpackiego). Biuletyn Geologiczny Wydziału Geologii UW, 29, 105–193. Kemp, B., 2009. Soil (including mud – brick architecture). In: P.T. Nicholson, I. Shaw (Eds), Ancient Egyptian Materials and technology. Cambridge

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Diogo Telles-Correia, Sérgio Saraiva and João Gama Marques

; 1963a. 5. Janzarik W. Temas y tendencias de la psiquiatria alemana. Madrid: Editorial Tricastela; 2001. 6. Jaspers K. The phenomenological approach in psychopathology. Br J Psychiatry 1968;114:1313-23. 7. Jaspers K. Gesammelte Schriftenzur Psychopathologie. Berlin: Springer Verlag; 1963b. 8. Jaspers K. Causal and ‘meaningful’ connections between life history and psychosis. In: Hirsch SR, Shepherd M, editors. Themes and variations in European psychiatry. Bristol: Wright; 1913, 1974 p. 80-93. 9. Telles-Correia D. Jaspers: Vida e obra. In

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Neil Forsyth

. Cambridge UP, 2006. Print Goldberg, Jonathan. Writing Matter: From the Hands of the English Renaissance . Stanford: Stanford UP, 1990. Print Marraud, Hélène. Rodin. La main révèle l’homme . Paris: Collection Tout L’oeuvre, éditions du musée Rodin. 2005. Print. Ramachandran, V. S. The Tell-Tale Brain. New York: Norton, 2012. Print. Rilke, Rainer Maria. Auguste Rodin . Trans. Daniel Slager. New York: Archipelago, 2004. Print. Ruiz-Gómez, Natasha. “Essence and Evanescence in the Hands of Rodin.” Ephemera: Thresholds 31. Boston: MIT, 2006

Open access

Dmitry Ruban

Mesozoic mass extinctions and angiosperm radiation: does the molecular clock tell something new?

Angiosperms evolved rapidly in the late Mesozoic. Data from the genetic-based approach called ‘molecular clock’ permit an evaluation of the radiation of flowering plants through geological time and of the possible influences of Mesozoic mass extinctions. A total of 261 divergence ages of angiosperm families are considered. The radiation of flowering plants peaked in the Albian, early Campanian, and Maastrichtian. From the three late Mesozoic mass extinctions (Jurassic/Cretaceous, Cenomanian/Turonian, and Cretaceous/Palaeogene), only the Cretaceous/Palaeogene event coincided with a significant, abrupt, and long-term decline in angiosperm radiation. If their link will be further proven, this means that global-scale environmental perturbation precluded from many innovations in the development of plants. This decline was, however, not unprecedented in the history of the angiosperms. The implication of data from the molecular clock for evolutionary reconstructions is limited, primarily because this approach deals with only extant lineages.

Open access

Susanna Saracco

Abstract

Philosophy of childhood is a field of inquiry in which the protagonists are adults, who are trying to understand children, and children, who are trying to be understood by adults. These two operating agents must find a common ground that renders their communication possible. This piece develops and illustrates the notion that no theorisation can exist if the authors of the theories do not know the subjects of their study, and thus that philosophers of childhood cannot contribute to knowledge about childhood unless they create occasions for the voices of children to be heard. Therefore, when activities are devised for the free expression of childhood, they cannot meaningfully be categorised as separate from philosophy of childhood. The latter cannot exist without the former. Philosophy of childhood and philosophy for children are interlaced in their work with children. Once the nature of childhood is understood through what children tell about themselves, instead of narrated through the interpretive frameworks of adults, the rights of the children can be effectively protected.