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Securitization of the Migration Crisis and Islamophobic Rhetoric: The 2016 Slovak Parliamentary Elections as a Case Study

policy discourse, which is analyzed here. First, I present the research design of my paper (research methods and research question; sources of data) and after that I turn to the basic theoretical framework of this paper: theory of securitization. Finally, I reflect the key point of this theory – speech act. I will not reflect all speech acts in political or societal discourse but focus on those that manifested anti-Muslim rhetoric. Lastly, in the analytical part of my paper, I will introduce my findings about the characteristics of securitization of Islamophobia during

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Editorial: Reflections on Islamophobia in Central and Eastern Europe

California Press Bleich, Erik. 2012. “Defining and Reseraching Islamophobia.” Review of Middle East Studies 46 (2): 180-199. 10.1017/S2151348100003402 Bleich Erik. 2012 “Defining and Reseraching Islamophobia.” Review of Middle East Studies 46 2 180 199 Carr, James. 2016. Experiences of Islamophobia: Living with Racism in the Neoliberal Era Rout-ledge: Abingdon and New York. Carr James. 2016 Experiences of Islamophobia: Living with Racism in the Neoliberal Era Rout-ledge Abingdon and New York Cesari, Jocelyne. 2009. The Securitization

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“This is a Controlled Invasion”: The Czech President Miloš Zeman’s Populist Perception of Islam and Immigration as Security Threats

), securitization of migration ( Bourbeau 2011 ; Androvičová 2015 ; Novotný 2017 ), and Islamophobia ( Ostřanský 2018 ). The concept of Islamophobia in the Czech Republic is a relevant concept for our research because the target audience of Zeman’s speeches “wants” to listen to such framing. Of course, this is in accordance with the theory of populism ( Mudde 2004 ). In regard to the fact that the President can be considered without doubt to be a moral authority or a “moral entrepreneur” (cf. Cohen 2011 ), the labels that he creates and introduces into dominant political and

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