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Dita Trčková

Abstract

Combining critical discourse analysis and the cognitive theory of metaphor, the study analyses hard news on Ebola from two American newspapers of a liberal political orientation, The New York Times and The New York Daily News, to investigate metaphoric representations of the disease and portrayals of its victims. It is revealed that both newspapers heavily rely on a single conceptual metaphor of EBOLA AS WAR, with only two alternative metaphors of EBOLA AS AN ANIMATE/HUMAN BEING and EBOLA AS A NATURAL CATASTROPHE employed. All three metaphoric themes assign the role of a culprit solely to the virus, which stands in contrast to non-metaphoric discursive allocations of blame for the situation in Africa, assigning responsibility mainly to man-made factors. African victims tend to be impersonalized and portrayed as voiceless and agentless, rarely occupying the role of a “fighter” in the military metaphoric representation of the disease, which runs counter to the findings of recent studies detecting a change towards a more positive image of Africa in the media. Both newspapers fail to represent infected ordinary Africans as sovereign agents, hindering readers from reflexively identifying with them.

Open access

Barnaby Nelson and Louis A. Sass

Abstract

Phenomenological research indicates that disturbance of the basic sense of self may be a core phenotypic marker of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Basic self-disturbance refers to disruption of the sense of ownership of experience and agency of action and is associated with a variety of anomalous subjective experiences. Little is known about the neurocognitive correlates of basic self-disturbance. In this paper, we review recent phenomenological and neurocognitive research and point to a convergence of these approaches around the concept of self-disturbance. Specifically, we propose that subjective anomalies associated with basic self-disturbance may be associated with: 1. source monitoring deficits, which may contribute particularly to disturbances of “ownership” and “mineness” (the phenomenological notion of presence) and 2. aberrant salience, and associated disturbances of memory, prediction, and attention processes, which may contribute to hyper-reflexivity, disturbed “grip” or “hold” on the perceptual and conceptual field, and disturbances of intuitive social understanding (“common sense”). These two streams of research are reviewed in turn before considering ways forward in integrative models, particularly regarding the role of early neurodevelopmental disturbances, primary versus secondary disturbances, and the state versus trait nature of such pathology. Empirical studies are required in a variety of populations in order to test the proposed associations between phenomenological and neurocognitive aspects of self-disturbance in schizophrenia. An integration of findings across the phenomenological and neurocognitive domains would represent a significant advance in the understanding of schizophrenia and possibly enhance early identification and intervention strategies.

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Birgit Glorius and Katja Manz

Abstract

This paper unfolds around an empirical experiment, which aimed to reveal the meaning of industrial culture and place attachment of local inhabitants of Chemnitz. The central argument of the article is that industrial culture is usually understood in a historicizing and aestheticizing way, fuelled by the possibilities to valorise the legacies of the age of industrialization and its persistent artefacts and structures for marketing or musealization purposes. This frequently observable urban strategy neglects the memories, experiences and emotions of local inhabitants, and thus fails to support positive identification processes with connection to the industrial past of a specific place. This paper elaborates a conceptual definition of industrial culture as a complex approach with tangible and intangible dimensions, various temporal layers and multiple, sometimes controversial narratives. It discusses the role of industrial culture for regional and local image building and place related identity formation and demonstrates – reporting from an empirical experiment–, how individual counter-narratives can be detected, visualized and transferred and thus can increase reflexivity of society and support regional identity processes.

Open access

Popular Cultural Memory

Comics, Communities and Context Knowledge

Karin Kukkonen

Abstract

Conventions of genres, types and icons of popular culture are the shared knowledge of media audiences. Becoming acquainted with them through the reception of media texts resembles a socialisation process in its own right: It constitutes a community of media readers. The context knowledge they share is their popular cultural memory. On the level of the individual reading process, this context knowledge then provides the necessary guiding lines for understanding the connotative dimensions of a popular media text.

Popular cultural memory is a repository of conventions and imagery that are continually reconstructed in contemporary popular culture. Drawing on J. Assmann’s writings on the functions and processes of collective memory, the present article develops popular cultural memory as a concept to describe the workings of context knowledge for media texts, while taking into consideration both the macrolevel of audience communities and the microlevel of the individual reading process.

The comics series Fables by Bill Willingham (NY: DC Comics Vertigo, 2003-) will provide the example through which the article explores the functions of popular cultural memory in media texts, which can take shapes as different as the identification of genre, the stabilisation of intertextual reference chains or the creation of round characters and complex reflexivity.

Open access

Christian Lamker

/Parnell 2016 ; Loorbach/Wittmayer/Shiroyama et al. 2016 ; de Leo/Forester 2017 ; de Roo 2018 ). For some, this resembles an image of 'uncharted waters' that calls for creative experimentation, for new inclusive democratic approaches and for thinking through potentialities ( Hillier 2010 : 472 f.; Rauws 2017 : 32 f.). However, there is a lack of adequate means of overcoming existing differences in society and experimenting with truly alternative ways of thinking. This article ponders on a reflexive and role-based approach to assembling conceptual ideas for joint

Open access

Ilze Laicāne, Jurģis Šķilters, Vsevolod Lyakhovetskii, Elīna Zimaša and Gunta Krūmiņa

). Stimulus magnification equates identification and discrimination of biological motion across the visual field. Vis. Res., 48, 2827-2834. Gurnsey, R., Roddy, G., Troje, N. F. (2010) Limits of peripheral direction discrimination of point-light walkers. J. Vis., 10 (2), 1-17. Higgins, K. E., Arditi, A., Knoblauch, K., (1996). Detection and identification of mirror-image letter pairs in central and peripheral vision. Vis. Res., 36 (2), 331-337. Hunt, A. R. Halper, F. (2008). Disorganizing biological motion. J. Vis., 8 (12), 1

Open access

Negotiating Creativity on a Small Budget

Creative Assumptions in DR3’s TV Commissioning

Mads Møller Andersen

forskningsinterviewet som redskab i produktionsanalysen [Exclusive informants: About the research interview as a tool in production analysis]. Nordicom-Information, 36(1): 29-45. Caldwell, John Thornton (2008). Production culture: Industrial reflexivity and critical practice in film and television . North Carolina: Duke University Press. Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly (1988). Society, culture and person: A systems view of creativity, pp. 325-339 in Sternberg, Robert J. (ed.) The nature of creativity: contemporary psychological perspectives . Cambridge: Cambridge University

Open access

Rita Vaicekauskaite and Asta Valackiene

. Journal of Economic Studies , 32 (3), 256–274. Gergen, K. J. (2015). An invitation to social construction (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Greco, A., & Jong, G. (2017). Sustainable entrepreneurship: Definitions, themes, and research gaps . University of Groningen. Working Paper series. Available at https://www.rug.nl/cf/pdfs/wps6_angela.pdf Karimi, S., Biemans, H. J. A., Lans, T., Chizari, M., & Mulder, M. (2016). The impact of entrepreneurship education: A study of Iranian students’ entrepreneurial intentions and opportunity identification

Open access

Fethi Mansouri, Amelia Johns and Vince Marotta

transcend the boundaries of the nation-sate. These and other political implications of transnationalism represent significant challenges to national articulations of citizenship with their concept of territorial demarcation and spatial fixity. In order to overcome these limitations and reflect the multiple identifications facilitated through different transnational practices and ties, new alternative (and often overlapping) frameworks for citizenship have been explored and advanced since the 1980s, most notably its post-national, multicultural, cosmopolitan and global

Open access

Mirek Dymitrow and Rene Brauer

other words. Essays towards a reflexive sociology. Cambridge: Polity Press. Braidotti, R., 2006: Posthuman, all too human: Towards a new process ontology. In: Theory, Culture & Society, Vol. 23(7-8), pp. 197-208. Brauer, R. and Dymitrow, M., 2014: Quality of life in rural areas: A topic for the Rural Development policy? In: Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series, Vol. 25, pp. 25-54. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/bog-2014-0028 Brauer, R. and Dymitrow, M., 2017a: Understanding conceptual vestigiality within social