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Rodica Dimitriu and Radu Andriescu

Abstract

Re-contextualising Shakespeare; Re-reading Shakespeare’s unconventional female characters; Shakespeare’s language and what it tells us; Transforming Shakespeare: adaptations and replacements

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Paul Tiessen

Memoir and the Re-reading of Fiction: Rudy Wiebe's of this earth and Peace Shall Destroy Many

Canadian novelist Rudy Wiebe's award-winning memoir, of this earth: A Mennonite Boyhood in the Boreal Forest (2006), invites readers into a warm subjective realm in which a meditative Wiebe (b. 1934) recounts his growing-up years from birth to age thirteen. As self-reflexive "rememberer," Wiebe explores the sensate freshness of a boy's ways of seeing, touching, and, not least, hearing the world. The young Wiebe lives with his parents and siblings and neighbours in an emotionally warm Christian community of 1920s immigrants to Canada who have fled from the Soviet Union in the wake of the 1917 Revolution and who struggle for economic survival in a remote corner of rural Saskatchewan during the 1930s and 1940s. But Wiebe's memoir of childhood is not only autobiography and social history; it is also a linguistic text that subtly invites readers to look beyond its textual boundaries to his earlier work. In particular, it has the effect of carrying alert readers back to the setting—at least physically and geographically if not altogether socially and culturally—of Wiebe's first novel, Peace Shall Destroy Many (1962). That early novel was a caustic work notoriously controversial especially among Mennonite readers in Canada when it appeared almost a half-century ago. The 2006 memoir—with intertextual allusion—invites readers to recall especially one layer of that early novel barely noticed by readers, a layer eclipsed and partially hidden by the dominant narrative. Specifically, it invites readers to see the virtually sinless and prelapsarian world of the idealistic young Hal Wiens whose idyllic life in the fictional spaces of Peace Shall Destroy Many goes unnoticed because it is so very much in the shadow of the doubts and tensions that inform the much larger world of his spiritually troubled older brother, nineteen-year old Thom Wiens. The memoir pushes readers into re-thinking the reception of that novel, and into finding anew beneath its severe and satiric treatment of the austere adult world the linguistic and spiritual joy of life given shape in the playful perceptions of the young Hal. The memoir becomes a stimulus for a transformational re-reading of the novel. This essay explores the two works in light of each other and of conventions that govern the two respective genres. It attempts, also, to account for the reading strategies that Wiebe's 2006 memoir proposes to readers of his first novel, and for key influences informing the two respective works.

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Rodica Dimitriu and Radu Andriescu

Abstract

All in all, the scholars whose papers are included in this issue of LINGUACULTURE come from different cultures and countries, share a common love for and interest in Shakespeare‘s work, from which they select highly different texts and resort to highly different methods of investigation. Although inevitably limited in number, these studies take us a long way from the ‗originals‘ in their home culture, to mid-twentieth century Romania, to Orson Welles in the 1950‘s or the 2016 American elections, to Japanese contemporary manga or…to the opera, at different times in history, once again testifying to the amazing plurality of response Shakespeare‘s works have received. In addition, as is well known, these studies are all tiny fragments of the same gigantic puzzle that is called Shakespearian scholarship. The editors of this issue hope that the readers will find here new stimulating pieces of information in a field that will never cease to fascinate us.

Open access

Cristina Diamant

and Ideology. Ed. by Jean Howard and Marion O‘Connor, London: Methuen, 1987, 143-163. Print. Rackin, Phyllis.”Misogyny is everywhere” in A Feminist Companion to Shakespeare. Ed. by Dympna Callaghan, 2nd edition, Oxford: Blackwell, 2016, 60-75. Print. Rose, Jacqueline. “Sexuality in the reading of Shakespeare: Hamlet and Measure for Measure” in Alternative Shakespeares. Edited by John Drakakis, 2nd edition, London: Routledge, 2002, 97-121. Print. Said, Edward. Orientalism, New York: Pantheon Books, 1978. Print

Open access

Siobhan Keenan

Abstract

The discovery of the body of the historical Richard III under a Leicester car park in 2012 sparked fresh interest in one of England’s most controversial kings. Accused of murdering his nephews—the Princes in the Tower—Richard’s reign was cut short when he was defeated by Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond (later Henry VII), at the Battle of Bosworth (1485). Richard was subsequently demonised in Tudor historiography, perhaps most famously by Sir Thomas More in his “History of King Richard the thirde” (printed 1557). It is to More that we owe the popular image of Richard III as a “croke backed” and “malicious” villain (More 37), an image which Shakespeare has been accused of further codifying and popularising in his Richard III. Today, the historical Richard III’s defenders argue for the king’s good qualities and achievements and blame early writers such as More and Shakespeare for demonising Richard; but, in Shakespeare’s case at least, this essay argues that the possibility of a sympathetic—and even a heroic—reading of the king is built in to his characterisation of Richard III.

Open access

Archibald L. H. M. van Wieringen

References Bovati P (1994) Re-Establishing Justice: Legal Terms, Concepts and Procedures in the Hebrew Bible (Journal for the Study of the Old Testament Supplement Series 105). Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press. Brooke GJ (2004) The Psalms in Early Jewish Literature in the Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls. In Moyise S and Menken MJJ (eds) The Psalms in the New Testament. London: T&T Clark, pp. 5-24. Brown WP (2010) Psalms (Interpreting Biblical Texts). Nashville, TN: Abingdon. Clines DJA, ed (1995

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Janusz Semrau

?: Reading and sexual difference. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press. Fleishmann, Fritz (ed.) 1982 American novelists revisited: Essays in feminist criticism . Boston, MA: G.K. Hall. Frank, Armin Paul - Kurt Mueller-Vollmer 2000 The internationality of national literatures in either America: Transfer and transformation. British America and the United States, 1770s-1850s. Göttingen: Wallstein. Genette, Gérard 1980 Narrative discourse: An essay in method . (Translated by Jane E. Lewin.) Ithaca, NY: Cornell