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Anna Wing Bo Tso

Abstract

Cross-dressing, as a cultural practice, suggests gender ambiguity and allows freedom of self expression. Yet, it may also serve to reaffirm ideological stereotypes and the binary distinctions between male and female, masculine and feminine, homosexual and heterosexual. To explore the nature and function of cross-dressing in Chinese and Western cultures, this paper analyzes the portrayals of cross-dressing heroines in two Chinese stories: The Ballad of Mulan (500-600 A.D.), and The Butterfly Lovers (850-880 A.D.). Distorted representations in the English translated texts are also explored..

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Lilijana Burcar

Verlag, pp. 111-134. Chew, Huibin Amelia. 2008. “What’s Left? After ‘Imperial Feminist’ Hijackings.” in Feminism and War: Confronting US Imperialism. Robin L. Riley et al. (Eds.). London: Zed Books, pp.75-90. Chomsky, Noam. 2003. Hegemony or Survival: America’s Quest for Global Dominance. Metropolitan Books. Chowdhury Halim, Elora. 2009. “Locating Global Feminisms Elsewhere: Braiding US Women of Color and Transnational Feminisms.” Cultural Dynamics vol. 21, no.1 (2009): 51-78. Hossain, Ismail, et al. 2013

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Aspasia Velissariou

Wiggins. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 75-159. Bronfen, Elisabeth. 1992. Over Her Dead Body: Death, Femininity and the Aesthetic. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Bushnell, Rebecca. 1990. Tragedies of Tyrants: Political Thought and Theater in the English Renaissance. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Butler, Judith, Laclau, Ernesto and Zizek, Slavoj. 2000. Contingency, Hegemony, Universality: Contemporary Dialogues on the Left. London: Verso, pp. 136-181. de Lauretis, Teresa. 1987

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Gurkan Gokasan and Erdal Aygenc

Abstract

This study aimed to visualise the written versions of legends, which can transform the intangible culture as one of the significant parts of culture covering human facts and some habits like art, customs, traditions, into the tangible culture which is the other part of culture, through certain theme/s. Within this perspective, the study aimed to transform the women and discursive representation styles given in the Turkish Cypriot legends into visual representation in addition to creating an absolute language through the use of homogenous indicators. The study discussed the woman described with the ‘passive’, ‘oppressed’, ‘victim’ and ‘sinful’ features, in brief her marginalisation with the patriarchal legend structure through the use of semiotics. For the visualisation of legends, regardless the positive or negative consequence of woman, the ‘torn paper - collage with its popular name - texture was used to create a common language and the emotions to be reflected were symbolised with various colours. The content references of colours were taken into account; for instance, purple was used in the images that woman was downtrodden and blue in the images with the dominant male hegemony. Since the themes covered generally referred to the ‘mother nature’, the woman figures were illustrated as naked delivering the woman in her purest, simplest and most natural self without the social status indicators symbolised by the clothes. The main scene and woman figures, mountain and sea motifs in the selected legends were re-fictionalised in the digital environment and finalised with the illustration. As the effectiveness of pictorial elements in teaching and facilitating to remember the legends, as a cultural element within the main scope of this study is known, the legends were illustrated through the digital collage method. Therefore, the contribution was aimed to be reflected on the permanence and popularity of legends as a cultural product and verbal asset with the benefits of visual and artistic language.

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Dong-Lan Ling and Hong-Jing Yu

advantages have been verified in numerous studies. In order to grasp the process of reflection and embrace the reflective skill, I reflect on a practice-based issue in relation to hegemony and power relationship between doctors and nurses in the workplace to gain new understanding and thus improve the my clinical practice. 2 Methods Although numerous useful reflective models have been developed in recent decades, Smyth’s framework 2 is one of the commonly utilized models in nursing practice, which helps to critique the status quo in power relationships and increases

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Lian-Lian Tang

, the author captures the essence of paternalistic decision-making in nursing practice. Then, she deconstructs it as a detached observer through review of the related values and beliefs. The theories of socialization, 5 reflexivity, 6 and hegemony 7 , 8 , 9 are adopted to underpin the reflection and help to understand her individual practice, social context, and relationship between both. In the third phase, a critical view is taken to confront and challenge the author’s own basic assumptions, even those of the society. Eventually, a new awareness is

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Gary D Bouma AM

( Stolz, 2006 ). Failure to contain a religion and what it offers can result in loss of their share of the religious market and consequently of status and income to its clergy ( Iannaccone, 1990 , 1994 ). Religions contained and packaged are usually patriarchal, dominated by men and accustomed to using non-inclusive language ( Jule, 2005 ). Moreover, most are quite resistant to the ministry and leadership of women except in rare cases ( Brubaker, 2013 ). They are not only packaged but are quite hierarchical, and as such, they have tended to be controlling and

Open access

Thomas Bürk, Manfred Kühn and Hanna Sommer

hegemonic system on various levels of deviation from the societal norm: In relation to the physically built city, stigmas are visible, usually material deviations from normative aesthetics, for instance in terms of the regulatory images of a cared for and clean city (e.g. stigmas like dirt, mess, decay, odour, graffiti). But stigmas can also be assigned to entire urban districts such as prefabricated housing developments, suburbs, or industrial or military districts. Statistical quantitative information about socio-economic or political and cultural deviations and