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Anna Pleshakova

). Hougaard, A., & Oakley, T. (eds.). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Hutcheon, L. (2000). A theory of parody: the teachings of twentieth-century art forms (Reprint edition). Urbana-Chicago: University of Illinois Press. Hutcheon, L. (2002). The politics of postmodernism (2nd edition). London-New York: Routledge. Hutchings, S., & Tolz, V. (2015). Nation, ethnicity and race on Russian television: mediating post-Soviet difference. (BASEES/Routledge Series on Russian and East European Studies). Abingdon

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Natalie Meisner and Donia Mounsef

Exhibition”, University of Saskatchewan. December 2013. <http://library.usask.ca/herstory/herstory.html>. Hobbes, Thomas. Leviathan. London: Penguin, 1988. Print. Homer. The Iliad. Trans. Robert Fitzgerald. New York: Doubleday, 1989. Print. Hutcheon, Linda. A Theory of Parody: The Teachings of Twentieth-Century Art Forms. New York: Methuen, 1985. Print. Irigaray, Luce. Speculum of the Other Woman. Trans. Gillian Gill. Ithaca: Cornell University Press P, 1985. Print ---. This Sex Which Is Not One. Trans

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Jaroslav Kušnír

Abstract

In the context of Baudrillard’s theory of simulacra, this paper analyzes Robert Coover’s depiction of different versions of “reality” as manifested in his short story “Stick Man”. The paper argues that through the depiction of transworld characters oscillating between different ontological levels and modes of representation, Coover

  1. treats the relation between fiction and reality,

  2. deals, in the context of some post-structuralist theories, with a question of representation connected especially with the relation between language and reality,

  3. parodies celebrity culture, mass media manipulation of the audience and consumerism as important aspects of contemporary (American) culture, and points out the replacement of the representation by “simulation” in the contemporary technologically advanced world.

Open access

Olena Tykhomyrova

hermeneutics of narrative transgression . Berlin-Boston: De Gruyter. Harris, J. (2001). The blackberry wine . Edinburgh: Black Swan. Hutcheon, L. (1980). Narcissistic narrative. The metafictional paradox . Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. Hutcheon, L. (1988). A poetics of postmodernism. History, theory, fiction . New York: Routledge. Hutcheon, L. (2000). A theory of parody: The teachings of twentieth-century art forms (Reprint edition). Urbana-Chicago: University of Illinois Press. Ingersoll, E.G. (2001). Engendering metafiction

Open access

Carla Portilho

. “The politics of parody.” The Politics of Postmodernism. London and New York: Routledge, 1989. Print. Internment Archives. Internmentarchives.com. N.d. Web. 29 November 2016. Jameson, Fredric. Cognitive Mapping. In: Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture, ed. C. Nelson and L. Grossberg. Champaign, IL: U of Illinois P, 1990. 347-360. Print. Karlsson, A. “The hyperrealistic short story: a postmodern twilight zone.” In: Criticism in the twilight zone: postmodern perspectives in literature and politics, ed. D. Fjellestad

Open access

Monika Sosnowska

Abstract

Shakespeare’s dramas are potentialities. Any Hamlet may be understood as the space in which Shakespeare’s thoughts are remembered, as a reproduced copy of the unspecified, unidentified source, the so called original. Simultaneously, it may be conceived of as the space where Shakespeare’s legacy and authority is tested, trifled and transgressed. Nowadays Shakespeare’s dramas are disseminated in multifarious forms such as: printed materials, audio and video recordings, compact audio discs, digital videos and disc recordings. Since I am fond of the cultural phenomenon called Hamlet, not a singe text or performance, but a continuum of human interaction with intermediated and transcoded versions of the drama, in this article I focus on the abovementioned single play. I accentuate the title character’s profound meaning in Shakespeare studies and his iconic status in Western culture in different media. I exploit W.B. Worthen’s concept of “Shakespeare 3.0.” to demonstrate Shakespeare’s presence in digital reality on the example of a comic rendering of Hamlet (Tugged Hamlet, 1992) by the Polish cabaret POTEM. Their cabaret sketch, although it was not created for the Internet audience, is available on-line via YouTube, consituting “Shakespeare 3.0.” Furthermore, I pose several questions and attempt to answer them in the course of my analysis: to what extent does the image of a mournful and contemplative Hamlet pervade different dimensions of culture, especially our collective imagination?; what chances of realization has a cultural fantasy of challenging the myth of a witty and contemplative Hamlet when re-written and presented as a pastiche or satire?; was the Polish cabaret POTEM succesful in their comic performance?

Open access

Anna Wing Bo Tso

Abstract

Cross-dressing, as a cultural practice, suggests gender ambiguity and allows freedom of self expression. Yet, it may also serve to reaffirm ideological stereotypes and the binary distinctions between male and female, masculine and feminine, homosexual and heterosexual. To explore the nature and function of cross-dressing in Chinese and Western cultures, this paper analyzes the portrayals of cross-dressing heroines in two Chinese stories: The Ballad of Mulan (500-600 A.D.), and The Butterfly Lovers (850-880 A.D.). Distorted representations in the English translated texts are also explored..

Open access

Duško Prelević

Abstract

In his “anti-zombie argument”, Keith Frankish turns the tables on “zombists”, forcing them to find an independent argument against the conceivability of anti-zombies. I argue that zombists can shoulder the burden, for there is an important asymmetry between the conceivability of zombies and the conceivability of anti-zombies, which is reflected in the embedding of a totality-clause under the conceivability operator. This makes the anti-zombie argument susceptible to what I call the ‘Modified Incompleteness’, according to which we cannot conceive of scenarios. In this paper I also argue that conceiving of the zombiesituation is a good starting point for rendering the zombie argument plausible.

Open access

Jolanta Szpyra-Kozłowska and Marek Radomski

References Abstract While the perception of Polish-accented English by native-speakers has been studied extensively (e.g Gonet & Pietroń 2004, Scheuer 2003, Szpyra-Kozłowska 2005, in press), an opposite phenomenon, i.e. the perception of English-accented Polish by Poles has not, to our knowledge, been examined so far despite a growing number of Polish-speaking foreigners, including various celebrities, who appear in the Polish media and whose accents are often commented on and even parodied. In this paper we offer a report on a

Open access

Raluca Moldovan

Lynch: Beautiful Dark. Lanham: The Scarecrow Press, 2008. Print. Poniewozik, James. “Go Ahead, Get Excited for the New Twin Peaks . Even If It Turns Out Awful.” Time Magazine, October 6, 2014. Web. Richardson, John. “ Laura and Twin Peaks : Postmodern Parody and the Musical Reconstruction of the Absent Femme Fatale.” The Cinema of David Lynch: American Dreams, Nightmare Visions . Ed. by Erica Sheen, Annette Davison. London: Wallflower Press, 2004. 77-92. Print. Riches, Simon. “Intuition and Investigation into Another Place: The Epistemological