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Pulmonary Gangrene - Severe And Rare Complication Of Pneumonia

References 1. Bradley JS, Byington CL, Shah SS, Alverson B, Carter ER, Harrison C, at al. The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2011;53(7):617-30. 2. Shakespeare W. Coriolanus. 1605-1608. 3. Allen JA. Pulmonary gangrene - Cases of Gangrene of the Lungs, with Pathological and Practical Remarks. Boston Med Surg J. 1836;15:229-33. 4. Epstein JW

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Pulseless Electrical Activity Arrest as the First Symptom of Testicular Cancer with Subsequent Phlegmasia Cerulea Dolens

Introduction Phlegmasia cerulea dolens (PCD) is a severe, rare complication of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which is characterised by compartment syndrome, arterial compromise, venous gangrene, and shock [ 1 ]. PCD is caused by extensive DVT which extends into collateral veins, causing total venous obstruction [ 2 ]. Subsequent venous congestion causes elevated intravascular pressure leading to extravasation of plasma and significant oedema. Compartment syndrome follows, resulting in arteriole collapse and ischaemia, and subsequent venous gangrene [ 1 , 2

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Severe pneumococcal pneumonia following Measles- Mumps- Rubella vaccination / Pneumonie pneumococică severă dezvoltată ca urmare a vaccinării Rujeolă-Oreion-Rubeolă

Abstract

Hereby, we report a case of severe multi-lobular pneumococcal pneumonia with gangrene requiring pneumonectomy and accompanying septic shock that developed 1 day after a live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccination in a 58-year old kindergarten teacher.

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An exploration of diabetic foot screening procedures data by a multiple correspondence analysis

1 Introduction Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting 8-11% of the general population ( 1 ). It is one of the major public health problems worldwide, including Slovenia ( 2 ). The disease is characterized by elevated blood sugar levels, which damage blood vessel walls, ultimately leading to end-organ injury. The financial burden of diabetes treatment and its complications is enormous ( 3 ). Gangrene and amputation are among the most feared complications of diabetes. More than 50% of all non-traumatic amputations are performed on

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A Pharmacological Review: Leptadenia reticulata (Wight & Arn.); Jivanti: the Real Life Giving Plant

Abstract

The present review reveals a comprehensive description of various pharmacological studies carried out on Leptadenia reticulata, a source of several active compounds, i.e. Leptadenia reticulata plant belonging to family Asclepiadaceae, it is also known as ‘Jivanti’, used for the treatment of various ailments in human civilization as well as used in folk medicine as a remedy in various reported herbal formulations. The plant has been found to exhibit diverse pharmacological activities like antibacterial activity, anticancer activity, lactogenic eff ect, antioxidant activity, anti-implantation activity, anti-asthmatic activity, modulating eff ect, activity of silver nano particles, hepatoprotective activity, antifungal activity, antidiabetic activity and anti-infl ammatory activity. Traditionally, the plant promotes fi tness and vigor, the tone of voice, cures eye diseases, fever, and night blindness, cough, maintain pregnancy and gangrene. In this review, we give the recent scientifi c update on this plant with therapeutic potential and discuss the methods of carrying out studies. The present review draws the attention of researchers towards the potential therapeutic activity of Leptadenia reticulata for their active constitute.

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Treading on tricky ground: reconstructive approaches to Charcot neuropathic arthropathy of the foot

Abstract

Introduction and purpose:Charcot neuroarthropathy defines a cluster of progressive lesions affecting the joints and bones, as well as the soft tissues of the foot in the context of diabetes, a pivotal role being attributed to peripheral neuropathy. Loss of sensation and proprioception, subsequent repeated trauma, muscle and autonomic nervous system impairment contribute to the alteration of the foot’s architecture and distribution of pressure, ultimately triggering ulceration and gangrene. The urge to avoid amputation has fueled the development of conservative and reconstructive techniques capable of delaying, if not preventing such negative outcomes. The purpose of this review was to present the most frequently used reconstruction procedures and the challenges arising in adapting them to particular foot morphologies and lesion stages. Methods:Literature search was conducted using PubMed, resulting in around 90 articles, multicenter studies and reviews, 26 of which were considered most relevant in providing the guidelines for orthopedic reconstruction and postoperative care in Charcot foot patients with diabetic neuropathy prevailing over arteriopathy. Results:The tarsometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints are most frequently affected. Closed reduction, arthrodesis, and tendon lengthening are key features of an efficient correction, alternatively accompanied by resections and tenotomies. Ulceration and callus debridement may also be necessary, while prolonged casting and immobilization remain obligatory. Conclusions:Most authors agree that stabilizing the deformities, optimizing the pressure on the soft tissues, and promoting the healing of potential lesions are the main purposes of the interventions. Prompt recognition and correction of Charcot foot deformities improve life quality and minimize the prospects of amputation.

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New insight into the rheumatoid vasculitis

Abstract

Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis (rheumatoid vasculitis, RV) has a heterogeneous clinical presentation that includes skin disorders, neuropathy, eye symptoms and systemic inflammation. Rheumatoid vasculitis is an unusual complication of longstanding, severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

While RA affects the body’s joints, vasculitis is a condition in which blood vessels become inflamed. Rheumatoid vasculitis occurs in approximately 2 to 5% of patients who have RA. The blood vessels most often involved are arteries that bring blood to the skin, nerves, and internal organs. Veins can also be involved. Rheumatoid vasculitis is skin condition that is a typical feature of RA, presenting as peripheral vascular lesions that are localized (purpura, cutaneous ulceration, and gangrene of the distal parts of the extremities). The cause of RV is unknown, but given the prominence of immune components and the pathologic changes in involved blood vessels, an autoimmune process is suggested. Compared to other forms of vasculitis, there has been relatively little research in recent years on the specific entity of RV. There is some evidence that the incidence of RV has decreased over the past several decades, perhaps because of a better treatment of the underlying RA. In the present review, we discuss the clinical features, laboratory tests, the pathogenesis of RV.

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Antiphospholipid Syndrome in Patient with Portal Venous Thrombosis: Case Report

Antiphospholipid Syndrome in Patient with Portal Venous Thrombosis: Case Report

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the presence of arterial and venous thrombosis, recurrent fetal death, cerebrovascular accidents, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and various manifestations on different organs in the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) and or lupus anticoagulant (LA).

It was reported in early 1980's. This syndrome is the most common cause of acquired thrombophilia. There is no consensus for treatment among physicians. Overall there is a general agreement that patients with recurrent thrombotic episodes require life-long anticoagulation therapy and those with recurrent spontaneous abortions require anticoagulation therapy (low molecular weight heparin) and low dose aspirin during most of gestation. Immunosuppresion seems to be ineffective exept in patients with fulminate multiple organ failure i.e. catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome where plasmapheresis can also be used.

We present a case of 31 year old woman with primary APS and portal venous thrombosis (PVT), without any recognizable autoimmune disease. She has 4 spontaneous abortions, calf thrombosis, gangrene of one toe, refractory cutaneous ulcer on the heel and livedo reticularis. She is positive for aCL and LA, with hypergammaglobulinemia.

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Efficacy of Different Fungicides Against Dry Rot Pathogen of Potato Caused by Fusarium sp. under In vitro Condition

species causing dry rot of potato tubers. In: Fusarium : Mycotoxins, Taxonomy and Pathogenicity. J. Chelkowski, Ed. Elsevier Science Publishing Co., Inc., New York, 435-440. Hooker, W.J. (1981). Compendium of potato diseases. American Phytopathological Society , St.Paul, MN. Lashin, S.M., & Henriksen, J.B. (1977). Control of gangrene and Fusarium dry rot on potato tubers with thiabendazole. Særtryk af Tidsskrift for Planteavl, 81 (3): 310-314. Rafiq, M., Mirza, J.H., Shakir, A.S., & Akhtar, K.P. (1995). Post harvest fungal diseases of potato

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Partial Caecal Necrosis – a Rare Cause of Right-Sided Inferior Abdominal Pain and Tenderness

. 1933; 26: 843–891. 17. Slam K, Calkins S, Cason F. Cecal perforation as an unusual presentation of pancreatic carcinoma. World J Surg Oncol. 2007; 5: 14. 18. Saegesser F, Chapuis G, Rausis C, Tabrizian M, Sandblom P. Intestinal distention and colonic ischemia: occlusive complications and perforations of colorectal cancers. A clinical application of Laplace's Law. Chirurgie. 1974; 100: 502–516. 19. Wiesner W, Mortelé KJ, Glickman JN, Ros PR. 'Cecal gangrene': a rare cause of right-sided inferior abdominal quadrant pain, fever, and leukocytosis. Emerg Radiol

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