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Sixt Wetzler

.2. Secondary sources Bauer, Matthias Johannes, ‘Teaching How to Fight with Encrypted Words. Linguistic Aspects of German Fencing and Wrestling Treatises of the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times’, in Late Medieval and Early Modern Fight Books. Transmission and Tradition of Martial Arts in Europe (14th-17th Centuries) , ed. by Daniel Jaquet et al., History of Warfare 112 (Leiden: Brill, 2016), pp. 47–61. Bowman, Paul, Martial Arts Studies. Disrupting Disciplinary Boundaries (London: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015). Burkart, Eric, ‘The Autograph of an

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Jacob Henry Deacon

://www.academia.edu/3397075/Boucicaut_Jehan_II_le_Maingre_1366-1421_ > (accessed 31/08/2016). Burkart, Eric, ‘Body Techniques of Combat: The Depiction of a Personal Fighting System in the Fight Books of Hans Talhoffer (1443-1467CE)’, in Killing and Being Killed: Perspectives on Bodies in Battle (Forthcoming), pp.105-25 Burkart, Eric, ‘Limits of Understanding in the Study of Lost Martial Arts. Epistemological Reflections on the Mediality of Historical Records of Technique and the Status of Modern (Re-) Constructions’, in Acta Periodica Duellatorum , Vol.4, No.2 (2016), pp. 5

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Daniel Jaquet

, Beitrag zur ältern Liteteratur oder Merkwürdigkeiten der Herzoglichen öffentlichen Bibliothek zu Gotha (Leipzig : Dyk’sche, 1838). Jaquet, Daniel, Karin Verelst, and Timothy Dawson, eds., Late Medieval and Early Modern Fight Books: Transmission and Tradition of Martial Arts in Europe (14th-17th Centuries) , History of Warfare 112 (Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2016). Jaser, Christian, ‘Ernst und Schimpf - Fechten als Teil städtlicher Gewalt- und Sportkultur’, in Agon und Distinktion. Soziale Räume des Zweikampfs zwischen Mittelalter und Neuzeit , ed. by Uwe

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Chassica Kirchhoff

,” (unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Stuttgart, 2008) Burkart, Eric, “The Autograph of an Erudite Martial Artist: A Close Reading of Nuremberg, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Hs. 3227a,” in Late Medieval and Early Modern Fight Books: Transmission and Tradition of Martial Arts in Europe (14 th -17 th Centuries), ed. by Daniel Jaquet, Karen Verelst, and Timothy Dawson, History of Warfare, 112 (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2016), 451-480 Briquet, C. M., Les filigranes: Dictionnaire historique des marques du papier dès leur apparition vers 1282 jusqu

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Economising Early Prints on Fight Books by Multiple Using Movable Half Page Woodcuts.

Insights into the layout work on the illustrations of Andre Paurnfeindt’s Fight Book of 1516 published by Hieronymus Vietor

Matthias Johannes Bauer

(Nordstedt: Books on Demand, 2014), without page numbering. Bauer, Matthias Johannes “Rezension”, Beiträge zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache und Literatur , 133 (2011), 510-4. Bauer, Matthias Johannes, “Teaching How to Fight with Encrypted Words: Linguistic Aspects of German Fencing and Wrestling Treatises of the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times”, in Daniel Jaquet, et al., eds., Late Medieval and Early Modern Fight Books. Transmission and Tradition of Martial Arts in Europe (14th-17th Centuries) (Leiden: Brill, 2016), p. 47-61 Bergner, Ute, and

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Daniel Jaquet

Fechtbuch Tradition’, in The Noble Art of the Sword: Fashion and Fencing in Renaissance Europe 1520-1630, ed. by Tobias Capwell (London: Paul Holberton Publishing, 2012), pp. 164-75. Haage, Bernhard Dietrich, and Wolfgang Wegner, eds., Deutsche Fachliteratur der Artes in Mittelalter und Früher Neuzeit, Grundlagen Der Germanistik, 43 (Berlin: E. Schmidt, 2006). Hagedorn, Dierk, Peter von Danzig: Transkription und Übersetzung der Handschrift 44 A 8 (Herne: Vs-Books, 2008). Hägele, Günter, “Von Pamplona nach Augsburg. Die

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Limits of Understanding in the Study of Lost Martial Arts

Epistemological Reflections on the Mediality of Historical Records of Technique and the Status of Modern (Re-)Constructions

Eric Burkart

). Bennett, Alexander, Kendo: Culture of the Sword (Oakland, California: University of California Press, 2015). Boffa, Sergio, Les manuels de combat (Fechtbücher et Ringbücher) , Typologie des sources du Moyen Âge occidental, 87 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2014). Bowman, Paul, Martial Arts Studies: Disrupting Disciplinary Boundaries , Disruptions (London: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2015). Burkart, Eric, ‘Body Techniques of Combat: The Depiction of a Personal Fighting System in the Fight Books of Hans Talhofer (1443-1467 CE)’, in Killing and Being

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Fanny Binard and Daniel Jaquet

References VI.1 Primary sources Anonymous, Liber de arte Dimicatoria, 1320-1330. Leeds, Royal Armouries, Ms I.33. Anonymous, compendium (Hans Talhoffer Fight book), 17th c. Wolfenbüttel, Herzog August Bibliothek, Cod. Guelf. 125.16 Extrav. VI.2 Secondary literature Cinato, Franck, ‘Development, Diffusion and Reception of the Buckler plays: A Fighting Art in the Making, a case study’, in Late Medieval and Early Modern Fight Books, ed. by Daniel Jaquet, Timothy

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Veronika Stoilova

., Youtube War: Fighting In A World Of Cameras In Every Cell Phone And Photoshop On Every Computer, p. 8 [6] 56.com, youku.com and tudou.com Bibliography 1. Dauber, C., Youtube War: Fighting In A World Of Cameras In Every Cell Phone And Photoshop On Every Computer, 2009. 2. Levy, F., 15 Minutes of Fame: Becoming A Star In The Youtube Revolution, Penguin Group, 2008. 3. Montopoli, Brian. “The Military Embraces YouTube.” Public Eye, March 27, 2007. 4. Naim, M., “The YouTube Effect.” Foreign Policy, January/February 2007. 5. Ricke, l. D

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Bosiljka M. Lalević-Vasić and Marina Jovanović

Abstract

After the First World War, Serbia was facing the lack of hospitals and physicians, and organization of the health care system was a real challenge. Both problems were closely associated with dermatovenereology. Between the two world wars, a great contribution to the development of Serbian dermatovenereology as a current discipline was given by Prof. Dr. Đorđe Đorđević, who was the first director of the Clinic for Skin and Venereal Diseases in Belgrade (1922 - 1935), and by his closest associate Prof. Dr. Milan Kićevac (1892 - 1940) who was his successor at the position of the director of the Clinic (1935 - 1940). In 1922, Prof. Dr. Đorđe Đorđević was the founder of two institutions significant for Serbian dermatovenereology: Clinic for Skin and Venereal Diseases, where he also acted as a director, and the Department of Dermatovenereology at the School of Medicine in Belgrade, where he was the first teacher of dermatovenereology. In 1927, Prof. Dr. Đorđe Đorđević initiated the foundation of the Dermatovenereology Section of the Serbian Medical Society, and he and his associate and successor, Prof. Dr. Milan Kićevac were the main organizers of the Association of Dermatovenereologists of Yugoslavia. With this Association, all other regional dermatovenereology sections in the County became parts of the Pan-Slavic Dermatovenereology Association. Prof. Dr. Đorđe Đorđević and Prof. Dr. Milan Kićevac also organized the First, Second and the Third Yugoslav Dermatovenereology Congresses (1927, 1928, and 1929), and in 1931, the Second Congress of Pan-Slavic Dermatovenereology Association. Their teamwork resulted in legislation concerned with health care, eradication of venereal diseases and prostitution, and finally with setting the foundation for professional and scientific dermatovenereology in Serbia. Prof. Đ. Đorđević investigated current problems of venereal diseases and organized professional expeditions in Serbia and Montenegro studying the expansion of syphilis. However, in his experimental work, Prof. M. Kićevac investigated photo-dermatoses and the IV venereal disease, at the same time pointing to immunological phenomena in streptococcal and staphylococcal infections. Dr. Vojislav Mihailović (1879 - 1949) was a significant figure in Serbian dermatovenereology and acted as the Chief of the Department of Skin and Venereal Diseases within the General Public Hospital in Belgrade. His scientific papers and books on the history of dermatovenereology and general medicine had a great impact on the Serbian dermatovenereology. His books dealing with the history of dermatovenereology: “The History of Venereal Diseases till 1912” and “Out of the History of Sanitary Health Care in the Rebuilt Serbia from 1804 - 1860”. Associate Professor Dr. Sava Bugarski (1897 - 1945), a student of Prof. Dr. Kićevac and later the director of Clinic for Skin and Venereal Diseases in Belgrade (1940 - 1945), was engaged in the field of experimental dermatovenereology. Dr. Jovan Nenadović (1875 - 1952), one of the most eminent physicians in Novi Sad, took part in the foundation and work of the Dermatovenereology Section of the Serbian Medical Society as well as its honorary life president. In 1919, he founded the Dermatovenereology Department within the Novi Sad Hospital, as well as an Outpatient Dermatovenereology Clinic, outside the Hospital, although he was the director of both institutions. In the period between the two world wars, among the most prominent physicians of the Military Sanitary Headquarters who contributed the development of dermatovenereology were the chiefs of the Dermatovenereology Department of the General Military Hospital in Belgrade: Major, later on, Brigadier General, Dr. Božidar Janković (1874 - 1936), and the Sanitary Brigadier General, Dr. Milivoje Pantić (1885 - 1959). Dr. B. Janković wrote important professional papers, among which the following are most significant: ”Fight against Venereal Diseases in the Army” and ”Treatment of Syphilis with Silber-Salvarsan.” Distinguished physicians of the military sanitary service, such as Dr. Petar Davidović, made significant contributions to the work of civilian dermatovenereology institutions of that time. In 1921, Dr. Petar Davidović was the director of the newly founded Venereal Department of the Niš Public Hospital, which was on a high professional level.