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Paweł Cywiński

-42. Loomba, A 2005, Colonialism/Postcolonialism, Routledge, London. McElroy, JL 2003, ‘Tourism development in small islands across the world’. Geography Annals, 85B(4), pp. 231-242. McKee, DL & Tisdell, CA 1990, Developmental issues in small island economies, Praeger, New York. Mowforth, M & Munt, I., 2003, Tourism and sustainability: development and New tourism in the Third World, (2nd edition), Routledge, London. Nandy, A 1983, The Intimate Enemy: Loss and Recovery of Self Under Colonialism, Oxford

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Rafał Kobis

taxi, one can move to places reminiscent of Istanbul, Cairo or Damascus. The architecture and the urban planning of Algiers clearly illustrate the specificity of Algeria as a country located at the crossroads of three civilizations: Western, Islamic and African. On the example of Algiers, we can clearly see the “clash” of the first two. Due to its history, the western part of the Islamic world is considered as “the least Arab”. This point of view is due to the still living legacy of French colonialism in this region of the World, both material and non-material. The

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Edna Barromi-Perlman

Abstract

The physical dimensions of people in archeological photographs in Palestine from before 1948 and in Western tourist landscape photography have played a role in forms of local documentation. The study discusses how this component affects readings and perceptions of photographs. It addresses Jewish propaganda photographs in which pioneers were intentionally enlarged and centered in photographs. It discusses forms of visual empowerment in relation to constructed dimensions of people as a form of Zionist defiance of British colonialism in Palestine.

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Hildegard Klein

Abstract

The above-mentioned authors offer a challenging and revealing study of the enjoyments and drawbacks of female sex tourism. I examine the interactions between white female tourists and local black men from the context of post-colonialism, asking whether these encounters can be considered a “fair trade” or whether they are the neo-colonising of people in this ex-slave society.

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Vanessa Massoni Da Rocha

Abstract

This text is dedicated to studying the fictionalization of traumas of (post)colonialism in the novel Pluie et vent sur Télumée Miracle by the Guadeloupean writer Simone Schwarz-Bart. Published in 1972, the book is built on the premise of novel writing as a therapeutic expression of trauma to be overcome. This implies bringing out the pain of slavery and of a miserable life in the sugar cane plantations through the resistance saga of four generations of valiant women. From a bottom-up perspective of history (Jim Sharpe) and the possibility of the subaltern’s testimony (Gayatri Spivak), emphasis is placed on the oppressed colonized (Frantz Fanon) as main characters, who break the silence for a long time imposed by their masters (Albert Memmi) in order to tell their story.

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Zachary A. Casey, Brian D. Lozenski and Shannon K. McManimon

Legacy. The Journal of Negro History, 86(1), 1-11. Delpit, L. (2006). Other people’s children cultural conflict in the classroom . New York: New Press. Dewey, J. (2008/1902). The Child and the Curriculum Including, The School and Society. New York: Cosimo, Inc. Ekeh, P. (1975). “Colonialism and the Two Publics in Africa: A Theoretical Statement.” Comparative Studies in Society and History, 17(1), 91-112. Emmer, E. T., & Evertson, C. M. (2013). Classroom management for middle and high school

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Mbanefo S. Ogene, Esther Chikaodi Anyanwu and Ngini Josephine Ojiaku

Abstract

One major problem confronting the definition of Comparative Literature is that of the involvement (on the one hand) of more than one literature under comparison and (on the other hand) that of the consideration of the multidimensional aspects of such literature, such as social, historical, linguistic, religious, economic and cultural aspects of divergent societies. This study is guided by the above factors in analyzing the concept of Racial Discrimination in Southern Africa and African American literatures in the sense that the former’s experiences were on African soil, while the latter’s were on the NewFound land (America). The paper observes that racial discrimination was much severe and oppressive without much resistance in America than in Southern Africa where Africans withstood and fought back against an unjust, wicked and oppressive system.

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Laurence Raw

Abstract

This essay exposes the constructed nature of the east/west binary as a means by which westerners (especially) can reinforce their sense of superiority, while easterners can use it as an intellectual stick to criticize their western counterparts. In its place I advocate a more measured approach based on listening to and understanding alternative perspectives, not only in terms of interpersonal relationships but in terms of personal psychology. The importance of mesearch as a concept, uniting scholarly and personal approaches, is proposed as a means to achieve this aim.

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Gabriella Tóth

Abstract

The witch has always been the representation of an unspeakable absence. Sycorax embodies all silenced African women, experiencing double patriarchy (a term used by Omofolabo Ajayi-Soyinka). Associated with the margins, she represented the barbarian Other to European culture. Sycorax decolonizes the male-dominated world of Prospero: from absence, she is turned into presence, as she constructs her subjective narrative

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Clemens Ruthner

-373. Cooper, Frederick. 2005. Colonialism in Question: Theory, Knowledge, History. Berkeley: U of California Press 2005. Csáky, Moritz, Johannes Feichtinger, and Ursual Prutsch, eds. 2003. Habsburg postcolonial: Machtstrukturen und kollektives Gedächtnis. Innsbruck: Studien-Verlag. Dedijer, Vladimir, et al. 1974. History of Yugoslavia, ed. Marie Longyear, trans. Kordija Kveder. New York: McGraw-Hill. Detrez, Raymond. 2002. “Colonialism in the Balkans: Historic Realities and Contemporary Perceptions.” Kakanien revisited, www