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Open access

Saša Polović, Vanja Ljoljić Bilić, Ana Budimir, Darko Kontrec, Nives Galić and Ivan Kosalec

Abstract

Aroylhydrazones 1–13 were screened for antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities in vitro. N′-(2-hydroxy-phenylmethylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (2), N′-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl-methylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (10), N′-(3,5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenylmethylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (11), and N′-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenylmethylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (12) showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, with MIC values (in µmol mL−1) of 0.18–0.23, 0.11–0.20, 0.16–0.17 and 0.35–0.37, resp. Compounds 11 and 12, as well as N′-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylmethylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (6) and N′-(2-hydroxy-5- methoxyphenylmethylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (8) showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, with the lowest MIC values of 0.005–0.2, 0.05–0.12, 0.06–0.48 and 0.17–0.99 µmol mL−1. N′-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylmethylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (7) showed antifungal activity against both fluconazole resistant and susceptible C. albicans strains with IC 90 range of 0.18–0.1 µmol mL−1. Only compound 11 showed activity against C. albicans ATCC 10231 comparable to the activity of nystatin (the lowest MIC 4.0 ×10−2 vs. 1.7 × 10−2 µmol mL−1). Good activity regarding multi-resistant clinical strains was observed for compound 12 against MRSA strain (MIC 0.02 µmol mL−1) and compounds 2, 6 and 12 against ESBL+ E. coli MFBF 12794, with the lowest MIC for compound 12 (IC 50 0.16 µmol mL−1). Anti-biofilm activity was found for compounds 2 (MBFIC 0.015–0.02 µmol mL−1 against MRSA) and 12 (MBFIC 0.013 µmol mL−1 against EBSL+ E. coli). In the case of compound 2 against MRSA biofilm formation, MBFIC values were comparable to those of gentamicin sulphate, whereas in the case of compound 12 and EBSL+ E. coli even more favourable activity compared to gentamicin was observed.

Open access

A. Piegerová, J. Koščová, P. Schusterová, R. Nemcová and M. Kryvtsova

REFERENCES 1. Al-Bakri, A. G., Othman, G., Afifi, F. U., 2010: Determination of the antibiofilm, antiadhesive, and anti-MRSA activities of seven Salvia species. Pharmacognosy Magasine , 6 (24), 264—270. DOI: 10.4103/0973-1296.71786. 2. Arciola, C. R., Campoccia, D., Ravaioli, S., Montanaro, L., 2015: Polysaccharide intercellular adhesin in biofilm: structural and regulatory aspects. Front. Cell Infect. Microbiol. , 5, 7, PMID: 25713785. DOI: 10.3389/fcimb.2015.00007. 3. Budzyńska, A., Wieckowska-Szakiel, M., Sadowska, B., Kalemba, D

Open access

Nadarajan Viju, Nagarajan Ezhilraj, Chellamnadar Vaikundavasagom Sunjaiy Shankar, Stanislaus Mary Josephine Punitha and Sathianeson Satheesh

. Biofouling 26: 73-88. Valle J, Da Re S, Henry N, Fontaine T, Balestrino D, Latour- Lambert P, Ghigo JM (2006) Broad spectrum biofilm inhibition by a secreted bacterial polysaccharide. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci U. S.A. 103: 12558-12563. Viju N, Satheesh S, Vincent SGP (2013) Antibiofilm activity of coconut (Cocos nucifera Linn.) husk fibre extract, Saudi J. Biol. Sci. 20: 85-91. Viju N, Anitha A, Vini SS, Shankar CVS, Satheesh S, Punitha SMJ (2014) Antibiofilm activities of extracellular polymeric substances produced by bacterial

Open access

Elena Ichim, Luminita Marutescu, Marcela Popa and Stelica Cristea

Abstract

Control of plant bacterial diseases remains difficult due to the limited availability of efficient plant protection products with reduced negative effects either in the environment or with human and animal health. In order to reduce the usage of chemical pesticides alternative strategies for controlling plant pathogens and improve plant disease resistance are promoted. The aim of the study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of some natural compounds (plant extracts of Tamarix ramosissima, Rosmarinus officinalis, Chelidonium majus, Silybum marianum, Satureja hortensis essential oil and propolis) against bacterial ring rot pathogen, Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus (Cms). An agar diffusion method was used for the screening of the inhibitory effect of natural compounds on bacterial strains’ growth. Minimum inhibition concentrations (MICs) were determined by a twofold serial dilution method. The anti-pathogenic activity was investigated by the study of anti-biofilm activity of natural substances. The analyzed natural substances showed a good microbicidal activity and anti-biofilm activity. The results obtained from this study may contribute to the development of new bio-control agents as alternative strategies for prevention and control of ring rot pathogen.

Open access

Gabi Mirela Matei, Sorin Matei, Adrian Matei and Elena Draghici

Abstract

Lactic acid bacteria are frequently utilized in food industry and they are also recognized as antimicrobial agents due to their capability to produce metabolites such as: organic acids, biosurfactants, bacteriocins, hydrogen peroxide, cyclic dipeptides, exopolysaccharides. The main goal of this paper was to present the results of the research carried out on the strain LCM2 of lactic acid bacteria isolated from brined cucumbers, for production of biosurfactants and to assess its antifungal properties. The emulsification capacity of biosurfactant was measured using kerosene as the hydrophobic substrate. The value of emulsification index E24 was 89.04% showing a high emulsification activity of the biosurfactant. The structural characterization of biosurfactant by TLC revealed its glycolipidic nature. Assay of the ionic charge established the anionic charge of the biosurfactant revealed by the presence of precipitation lines towards the cationic surfactant dodecyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride. The biosurfactant presented antibiofilm activity with low adherence capacity, structural damages of the hyphal net, conidiophores and delays or lack of sporulation and decreased biomass accumulation in four mycotoxigenic Penicillium and Aspergillus isolates. Results of in vitro assays recommend the biosurfactant produced by the new lactic acid bacteria strain LCM2 for biotechnological purposes, as alternative antifungal agent in food industry.

Open access

Andrei-Marian Feier, Andrei-Constantin Ioanovici, Radu-Cristian Ionescu, Tamas Toth and Octav-Marius Russu

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Open access

Saule Amangeldykyzy, Aidana Nurlybekkyzy Nurlybek, Aigerim Nurlybekkyzy Nurlan, Konrad T. Juszkiewicz, Andrzej Polski, Ulzhan Baurzhankyzy Seisembay, Adiya Maksatovna Mukasheva, Urumbaeva Kathira Umirzakovna and Ewa Poleszak

.J. et al.: Copper and Quaternary Ammonium Cations Exert Synergistic Bactericidal and Antibiofilm Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother., 52, 2874, 2008. 8. Kluytmans J. et al.: Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus: epidemiology, underlying mechanisms, and associated risks. Clin. Microbiol. Rev., 10, 508, 1997. 9. Lallemand F. et al.: Successfully improving ocular drug delivery using the cationic nanoemulsion, novasorb. J. Drug Deliv., 604204, 3, 2012. 10. Martindale: The Complete Drug

Open access

D. Marcinčáková, M. Falis, P. Schusterová, P. Váczi, S. Marcinčák and J. Legáth

-Capó, S., Navarro-Palou, M., Ros, T., Amat, J. C., et al., 2014: xCELLigence system for real-time label-free monitoring of growth and viability of cell lines from hematological malignancies. Onco-Targets and Therapy , 7, 985—994. 10. Muruzović, M. Ž., Mladenović, K. G., Stefanović, O. D., Vasić, S. M., Čomić, L. R., 2016: Extracts of Agrimonia eupatoria L. as sources of biologically active compounds and evaluation of their antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antibiofilm activities. J. Food Drug Anal. , 24, 539—547. 11. Özdemir, A, Ark, M., 2013

Open access

Dijana Trišić, Bojana Ćetenović, Igor Jovanović, Elizabeta Gjorgievska, Branka Popović and Dejan Marković

References 1. Nair PN. Pathogenesis of apical periodontitis and the causes of endodontic failures. Crit Rev Oral Biol Med, 2004;15:348-381. 2. Neelakantan P, Cheng CQ, Mohanraj R, Sriraman P, Subbarao C, Sharma S. Antibiofilm activity of three irrigation protocols activated by ultrasonic, diode laser or Er:YAG laser in vitro. Int Endod J, 2015;48:602-610. 3. Fedorowicz Z, Nasser M, Sequeira-Byron P, de Souza RF, Carter B, Heft M. Irrigants for non-surgical root canal treatment in mature permanent teeth. Cochrane

Open access

Mohaddese Mahboubi and Atefeh Mahboubi

antibiofilm potential of Capparis spinosa . Archives of Medical Research 2011; 42:658-668. 8. Lam SK, Ng TB. A protein with anti-proliferative, antifungal and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities from caper ( Capparis spinosa ) seeds. Phytomed 2009; 16: 444-450. 9. Haghi G, Hatami A, Arshi R. Distribution of caffeic acid derivatives in Gundelia tournefortii L. Food Chem 2011; 124(3):1029-1035. 10. Mahboubi M, Kazempour N, Boland Nazar AR. Total phenolic, total flavonoids, antioxidant and antimicrobial