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Natalia Petruk

References 1. Alberti, L. (1960). I libri della famiglia. Opert volgari [Thoughts on Family. The Collections of Works]. Volume 1. Laterza, 472 p. (in Italian). 2. Garin, E. (1971). Educazione umanistica in Italia [Humanistic Education on Italy], Bari, 120 p. (in Italian). 3. Kristeller, P. (1974). Humanismus und Renaissance [Humanism and Renaissance]. Munchen : Fink, 539 p. (in German). 4. Lytvynov, V. (2012). Ukraine: Seeking Its Identity. The 16th-Early 17th Centuries. Historical and

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Natalia Petruk

References 1. Домбровський, І. (1995). Дніпрові камені. Українські гуманісти епохи Відродження. Антологія [Dnipro Stones. Ukrainian humanist of Renaissance. Anthology]. K. : Наукова думка; Основи, Part 2, p. 200–221 (in Ukrainian). 2. Кленович, С. (1984). Роксоланія. Антологія української поезії [Roksolania. Anthology of Ukrainian poetry]. V. 1. K. : Дніпро, p. 62–77 (in Ukrainian). 3. Литвинов, В. (2000). Ренесансний гуманізм в Україні [Renaissance humanism in Ukraine]. K : Основи, p. 468 (in Ukrainian). 4. Литвинов, В. (2005). Католицька Русь

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Ken Mondschein

Martial Arts of Renaissance Europe (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001). Anglo, Sydney, “The Man Who Taught Leonardo Darts: Pietro Monte and his ‘Lost’ Fencing Book”, The Antiquities Journal 69 (1983), 261–278. Baxandall, Michael, “Guarino, Pisanello, and Manuel Chrysoloras.” The Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 28 (1965), 183–204. Bestor, Jane Fair, “Bastardy and Legitimacy in the Formation of a Regional State in Italy: The Estense Succession”, Comparative Studies in Society and History 38/3 (1996), 549–585. Boccia

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Alina Nowicka -Jeżowa

Summary

The article tries to outline the position of Piotr Skarga in the Jesuit debates about the legacy of humanist Renaissance. The author argues that Skarga was fully committed to the adaptation of humanist and even medieval ideas into the revitalized post-Tridentine Catholicism. Skarga’s aim was to reformulate the humanist worldview, its idea of man, system of values and political views so that they would fit the doctrine of the Roman Catholic church. In effect, though, it meant supplanting the pluralist and open humanist culture by a construct as solidly Catholic as possible. He sifted through, verified, and re-interpreted the humanist material: as a result the humanist myth of the City of the Sun was eclipsed by reminders of the transience of all earthly goods and pursuits; elements of the Greek and Roman tradition were reconnected with the authoritative Biblical account of world history; and man was reinscribed into the theocentric perspective. Skarga brought back the dogmas of the original sin and sanctifying grace, reiterated the importance of asceticism and self-discipline, redefined the ideas of human dignity and freedom, and, in consequence, came up with a clear-cut, integrist view of the meaning and goal of the good life as well as the proper mission of the citizen and the nation. The polemical edge of Piotr Skarga’s cultural project was aimed both at Protestantism and the Erasmian tendency within the Catholic church. While strongly coloured by the Ignatian spirituality with its insistence on rigorous discipline, a sense of responsibility for the lives of other people and the culture of the community, and a commitment to the heroic ideal of a miles Christi, taking headon the challenges of the flesh, the world, Satan, and the enemies of the patria and the Church, it also went a long way to adapt the Jesuit model to Poland’s socio-cultural conditions and the mentality of its inhabitants.

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Alina Nowicka-Jeżowa

Summary

Based on earlier research, and especially Tadeusz Ulewicz’s landmark study Iter Romano- -Italicum Polonorum, or the Intellectual and Cultural Links between Poland and Italy in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (1999) this article examines the influence of Rome - in its role as the Holy See and a centre of learning and the arts - on Poland’s culture in the 15th and 16th century as well as on the activities of Polish churchmen, scholars and writers who came to the Eternal City. The aim of the article is to trace the role of the emerging Humanist themes and attitudes on the shape of the cultural exchange in question. It appears that the Roman connection was a major factor in the history of Polish Humanism - its inner development, its transformations, and the ideological and artistic choices made by the successive generations of the Polish elite. In the 15th century the Roman inspirations helped to initiate the Humanist impulse in Poland, while in the 16th century they stimulated greater diversity and a search for one’s own way of development. In the post-Tridentine epoch they became a potent element of the Poland’s new cultural formation. Against the background of these generalizations, the article presents the cultural profiles of four poets, Mikołaj of Hussów, Klemens Janicjusz, Jan Kochanowski, and Mikołaj Sęp Szarzyński. They symbolize the four phases of the Polish Humanist tradition, which draw their distinctive identities from looking up to the Roman model

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Jean Chandler

). Nicoletto Giganti, The ‘Lost’ Second Book of Nicoletto Giganti (1608): A Rapier Fencing Treatise, translated by P. Terminiello and J. Pendragon (London: Fox Spirit, 2013). Senese, translated by Piermarco Terminiello, unpublished work. VIII.2. Secondary literature Anglo, Sydney, Martial Arts of Renaissance Europe (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000). Baker, Nicholas Scott, Writing the Wrongs of the past: Vengeance, Humanism, and the Assassination of Alessandro de’ Medici’ The Sixteenth Century Journal , 38/2 (2007). Dollinger, Philippe

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Egil Grislis

: Williams B. Eerdmans. Bromiley, GW (1953) Zwingli and Bullinger (Library of Christian Classics). Philadelphia, PA: Westminster Press. Brown, P (1967) Augustine of Hippo: A Biography. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press. Bullinger, H (1852) The Decades, volumes 1-10. Cambridge: The Parker Society. Bush, D (1939) The Renaissance and English Humanism. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Calvin, J (1960) The Institutes of the Christian Religion. Philadelphia, PA

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Yasser Fouad Selim

Kentucky, 1995. “MIT Global Shakespeares: Arab World.” MIT Global Shakespeares. 2 October 2017 < http://globalshakespeares.mit.edu/# > McClinton, Brian. “Humanism in the Renaissance.” Humani 98 (March 2006):10-16. Shakespeare, William. King Lear . Shakespeare Online. 25 May 2017. < http://www.shakespeare-online.com/plays/learscenes.html > “William Shakespeare.” IMDb. 2 October 2017 < http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000636/ >

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Anca-Luminiţa Iancu

. Transcultural Imaginings: Translating the Other, Translating the Self in Narratives about Migration and Terrorism . Sofia: KX: Critique and Humanism, 2016. Gray, Jeffrey. “Essence and the Mulatto Traveler: Europe as Embodiment in Nella Larsen’s ‘Quicksand’.” NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction 27.3 (Spring 1994): 257-270. Harrison-Kahan, Lori. “‘Drunk with the Fiery Rhythms of Jazz’: Anzia Yezierska, Hybridity, and the Harlem Renaissance.” Modern Fiction Studies 51.2 (2005): 416-436. Hart, Betty L., and Anna A. Moore. “Nella Larsen.” American Ethnic Writers . Rev

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Randall J. Pederson

Bibliography Amos NS (2015) Bucer, Ephesians, and Biblical Humanism. The Exegete as Theologian . New York, NY: Springer. Ballor JJ (2013) The Shape of Reformed Orthodoxy in the Seventeenth Century. The Soteriological Debate Between George Kendall and Richard Baxter. In Ballor J, Sytsma D, and Zuidema J (eds) Church and School in Early Modern Protestantism. Studies in Honor of Richard A. Muller on the Maturation of a Theological Tradition. Leiden: Brill. Ballor JJ, Sytsma D, Zuidema J (2013) Church and School in Early Modern Protestantism