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Piotr ŚwiĄtek, Anna Świder and Aleksander Bielecki

References Brumpt, E., 1900: Reproduction des Hirudinées. Mem. Soc. Zool. Fr. 13 : 286-430. Fernández, J., Tellez, V., Olea, N., 1992: Hirudinea. In: Harrison F. W., Gardiner S. L. Editors. Microscopic anatomy of invertebrates. Volume 7: Annelida. Wiley-Liss, Inc., New York: 323-394. Harant, H., Grassé, P-P., 1959: Classe des Annélides Achetes ou Hirudunés ou Sangsues. In: Grassé P-P. Editor. Traité de Zoologie. Anatomie, Systématique, Biologie. Tome V. Annélides, Myzostomides

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A. Öktener and S. Utevsky

References Akmirza A. Parasite fauna of the greater weever (Trachinus draco Linnaeus, 1758) // Acta Adriatica. — 2004. — 45 , N 1. — P. 35-41. Burreson E. M. Phylum Annelida: Hirudinea as Vectors and Disease Agents // Fish Diseases and Disorders. Vol I. Protozoan and Metazoan Infections / Cab International, 1995. — P. 599-629. Epshtein V. M. New information on the structure and, geographic distribution and hosts of the marine tropical leech Trachelobdella lubrica (Piscicolidae

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Victor Surugiu

Revision Of The Medicinal Leech Hirudo Medicinalis Linnaeus, 1758 (Hirudinea: Hirudinidae): Re-Description Of Hirudo Troctina Johnston, 1816 From North Africa. Journal Of Natural History, 36: 1269-1289. Kutschera, U., J. M. Elliott (2014) The European Medicinal Leech Hirudo Medicinalis L.: Morphology And Occurrence Of An Endangered Species. Zoosystematics And Evolution, 90 (2): 271-280. Saglam, N., R. Saunders, S. A. Lang, D. H. Shain (2016) A New Species Of Hirudo (Annelida: Hirudinidae): Historical Biogeography Of Eurasian Medicinal

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D. J. López-Peraza, M. Hernández-Rodríguez, B. Barón-Sevilla, L. F. Bückle-Ramírez and M. I. Grano-Maldonado

References A lves J.O.P., M onteiro , F.A.C., M atthews -C asconn , H, C ascon , P. (2014): Annelida, Hirudinea, Piscicolidae, Stibarobdella macrothela (Schmarda, 1861): First report for northeastern Brazil. Check List , 10(5): 1161 – 1163. DOI: 10.15560/10.5.1161 B aşusta , N., D e M eo , I., M iglietta , C., M utlu , E., T unca , M., Ş ahin , A., B alaban , C., C engiz M., U sakli , U., P atania , A. (2015): Some marine leeches and first record of Brachellion torpedinis Savigny, 1822 (Annelida, Hirudinea, Psicolidae) from elasmobranchs in

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Julio Parapar, Gudmundur V. Helgason, Igor Jirkov and Juan Moreira

Hancock Monographs in Marine Biology Los Angeles, California 2: 1–387. HARTMAN O. and FAUCHALD K. 1971. Deep-water benthic polychaetous annelids off New England to Bermuda and other North Atlantic areas. Part II. Allan Hancock Monographs in Marine Biology, Los Angeles, California 6: 1–327. HARTMANN-SCHRÖDER G. 1996. Annelida, Borstenwürmer, Polychaeta. Die Tierwelt Deutschlands, 58, 2 nd edition . Gustav Fischer, Jena: 648 pp. HANSEN B. and ØSTERHUS S. 2000. North Atlantic-Nordic Seas exchanges. Progress in Oceanography 45: 109–208. HAYASI I. and HANAOKA

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Iorgu Petrescu and Ana–Maria Petrescu

Abstract

The catalogue of the invertebrate collection donated by Prof. Dr. Ion Cantacuzino represents the first detailed description of this historical act. The early years of Prof. Dr. Ion Cantacuzino’s career are dedicated to natural sciences, collecting and drawing of marine invertebrates followed by experimental studies. The present paper represents gathered data from Grigore Antipa 1931 inventory, also from the original handwritten labels. The specimens were classified by current nomenclature. The present donation comprises 70 species of Protozoa, Porifera, Coelenterata, Mollusca, Annelida, Bryozoa, Sipuncula, Arthropoda, Chaetognatha, Echinodermata, Tunicata and Chordata.. The specimens were collected from the North West of the Mediterranean Sea (Villefranche–sur–Mer) and in 1899 were donated to the Museum of Natural History from Bucharest. The original catalogue of the donation was lost and along other 27 specimens. This contribution represents an homage to Professor’s Dr. Cantacuzino generosity and withal restoring this donation to its proper position on cultural heritage hallway.

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S. Bulguroğlu, J. Korun, M. Gökoğlu and Y. Özvarol

[1] Akmirza, A. (2004): Parasite fauna of the greater weever (Trachinus draco Linnaeus, 1758). Acta Adriat., 45: 35–41 [2] Arslan, N., Öktener, A. (2012): A general review of parasitic Annelida (Hirudinea) recorded from different habitats and hosts in Turkey. Turk. J. Zool., 36(1): 141–145 [3] Ergüven, H., Candan, A. (1992): A parasitic Hirudinea (Pontobdella muricata Linnaeus) at Raja sp. in Marmara Sea. Turk. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci., 2: 1–4 [4] Furiness, S

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A. B. Chaplygina, D. I. Yuzyk and N. O. Savynska

Abstract

The role of the robin, Erithacus rubecula Linnaeus, 1758 as a consort of autotrophic consortia is considered. It has been found that representatives of 9 higher taxa of animals (Mammalia, Aves, Gastropoda, Insecta, Arachnida, Acarina, Malacostraca, Diplopoda, Clitellata) have trophic and topical links with the robin. At the same time, the robin is a consort of determinants of autotrophic consortia, which core is represented mostly by dominating species of deciduous trees (Quercus robur Linnaeus, 1753 (24.6 %), Tilia cordata Miller, 1768 (17.5 %), Acer platanoides Linnaeus, 1753 (22.8 %), Acer campestre Linnaeus, 1753), and also by sedges (Carex sp.) and grasses (Poaceae). The robin also belongs to the concentre of the second and higher orders as a component of forest biogeocenoses and forms a complex trophic system. In the diet of its nestlings, there have been found 717 objects from 32 invertebrate taxa, belonging to the phylums Arthropoda (99.2 %, 31 species) and Annelida (0.8 %, 1 species). The phylum Arthropoda was represented by the most numerous class Insecta (76.9 %), in which 10 orders (Lepidoptera (46.8 %) dominates) and 20 families were recorded, and also by the classes Arachnida (15.0 %), Malacostraca (5.3 %) and Diplopoda (1.9 %). The invertebrate species composition was dominated by representatives of a trophic group of zoophages (14 species; 43.8 %); the portion of phytophages (7 species; 21.9 %), saprophages (18.7 %), and necrophages (15.6 %) was the less. The highest number of food items was represented by phytophages (N = 717; 51 %), followed by zoophages (34 %), saprophages (12 %), and necrophages (3 %). The difference among study areas according to the number of food items and the number of species in the robin nestling diet is shown. In NNP “HF”, the highest number of food items was represented by phytophages - 47 % (N = 443), whereas zoophages were the most species-rich group (43.3 %, 13 species). In NNP “H”, phytophages also prevailed in food items - 62.3 % (N = 164), but the number of phyto-, zoo- and saprophage species was equal (30.8 %, 13 species). In the forest park, zoophages were more frequent - 45.5 % (N = 110), but phytophages were the most species-rich (42.9 %).

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Adrian Gagiu

-tract microbiota of Hirudo orientalis , a European medicinal leech. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 74 (19): 6151-6154. MINELLI, A., 2007 - Fauna Europaea: Annelida: Hirudinea. Fauna Europaea version 1.3 http://www.faunaeur.org MOOG, O., A. SCHMIDT-KLOIBER, T. OFENBÖCK, J. GERRITSEN, 2001 - Aquatische Ökoregionen und Fließgewässer-Bioregionen Österreichs - eine Gliederung nach geoökologischen Milieufaktoren und Makrozoobenthos-Zönosen. Bundesministerium für Land- und Forstwirtschaft, Umwelt und Wasserwirtschaft

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Amir Faraz Ghasemi, Armin Jam, Mehrshad Taheri and Maryam Foshtomi

, a new spionid polychaete species (Annelida: Polychaeta) from Florida and the Gulf of Mexico with an analysis of phylogenetic relationships within the genus Streblospio, Proceeding of the Biological Society of Washington , 111, 694-707. 18. Roohi A., Kideys A. E., Sajjadi A., Hashemian A., Pourgholam R., Fazli H., Khanari A. and Eker-Develi E., 2010 − Changes in biodiversity of phytoplankton, zooplankton, fishes and macrobenthos in the Southern Caspian Sea after the invasion of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis Leidyi, Biological Invasions , 12, 2343-2361. 19