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Jennifer Dykema, Dana Garbarski, Ian F. Wall and Dorothy Farrar Edwards

for Public Opinion Research, May 17–20. 2012. Orlando, Florida, U.S.A. Dykema, J., N.C. Schaeffer, and D. Garbarski. 2019. “Towards a Reconsideration of the Use of Agree-Disagree Questions in Measuring Subjective Evaluations.” Unpublished manuscript, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison-WI. Edwards, D.F. 2015. “Voices Heard.” Presented at the Health Equity Leadership Institute, Madison, WI. Egede, L.E. and C. Ellis. 2008. “Development and Testing of the Multidimensional Trust in Health Care Systems Scale.” Journal of General Internal Medicine

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Marija Karanikić Mirić

Anniversary of His Death ). Beograd: Službeni glasnik, 2011. 8. Henket, Maarten. “Contracts, Promises and Meaning: The Question of Intent.” International Journal for the Semiotics of Law 5 (1989): 129–148. 9. MacCormick, Neil. Legal Reasoning and Legal Theory . Oxford: OUP, 1994. 10. Marella, Maria Rosaria. “The Old and the New Limits to Freedom of Contract in Europe.” European Review of Contract Law 2 (2006): 257–274. 11. Mitchell, Catherine. Interpretation of Contracts . London & New York: Routledge-Cavendish, 2007. 12. Rott, Hans

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Nely Keinänen

Macbeth to Hamlet : A Ten-Year Learning Process]. Synteesi 1-2/2016 (volume 35): 71-81. Munday, Jeremy. Introducing Translation Studies, 2nd edition . London: Routledge, 2008. Puurtinen, Tiina. “Two Translations in Comparison: A Study on Readability.” Tirkkonen-Condit, Sonja and Stephen Condit, eds. Kielitieteellisiä Tutkimuksia, Studies in Languages . Joensuu: University of Joensuu, 1989. 87-111. Rissanen, Matti. Ollako vai eikö olla? Kenen käännös? Kas siinä pulma [To be or not to be? Whose Translation? That is the Question]. Helsinki: Research

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Dale Jacquette

Abstract

The concept of a dialogue is considered in general terms from the standpoint of its referential presuppositions. The semantics of dialogue implies that dialogue participants must generally have a collective intentionality of agreed-upon references that is minimally sufficient for them to be able to disagree about other things, and ideally for outstanding disagreements to become clearer at successive stages of the dialogue. These points are detailed and illustrated in a fictional dialogue, in which precisely these kinds of referential confusions impede progress in shared understanding. It is only through a continuous exchange of question and answer in this dialogue case study that the meanings of key terms and anaphorical references are disambiguated, and a relevantly complete collective intentionality of shared meaning between dialogue participants is achieved. The importance of a minimally shared referential semantics for the terms entering into reasoning and argument in dialogue contexts broadly construed cannot be over-estimated. Where to draw the line between referential agreement and disagreement within any chosen dialogue, as participants work toward better mutual understanding in clearing up referential incongruities, is sometimes among the dialogue’s main points of dispute.

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Anna Onoyase

Abstract

The study was set out to investigate the attitude of parents toward female-child secondary education in Sokoto State, Nigeria. One research question and one hypothesis were formulated to guide the study. The study is a descriptive survey and made use of ex-post facto design. The researcher made use of purposive sampling technique to select 270 parents from the urban and 270 parents from the rural areas of Sokoto State. The researcher made use of an instrument adapted from that of Terhemba and Umaru 2015. The instrument is known as “Attitude of Parents Toward Female Child Secondary Education Questionnaire” (APTFCSEQ). The APTFCSEQ had a reliability coefficient of 0.81. The instrument had facial and content validity. It also had language appropriateness. The researcher used four (4) research Assistants to administer 540 copies of the questionnaire on the respondents. All the 540 copies of the questionnaire were retrieved showing 100 percent return rate. The data generated from the field were collated and the mean score analysis for the 15 items was carried out in order to provide answer to the research question raised in the study. 2.5 was chosen as the benchmark for either disagreeing or agreeing with each of the 15 items. The t-test statistics was used to test the hypothesis at 0.05 level of significance. The investigation found out that parents in Sokoto State have shown unfavourable attitude toward female-child secondary education. It found out that there is no significant difference between parents in the urban and rural areas in their attitude toward female-child secondary education. This finding has shown that whether the parent is in urban or rural area, all of them have expressed their opinion in the same direction. One of the recommendations of the study is that parents in Sokoto State should show favourable attitude toward female-child secondary education.

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R. Krastev and V. Mitev

Summary

A study of the public opinion in Bulgaria in regard to the possibility of the adult children, created by gamete donation, to learn who their biological parents are was made. This investigation was an on-line survey. The participants in the study are individuals between 18 and 65 years of age - Internet users. The survey was included into different web sites and this enlarged the number of respondents (up to 994) and 85% of them were persons in fertile age - from 18 to 43 years. The answers of the respondents in relation of the demographic features - gender, age, education, family status and place of living were studied. The data were calculated with the special statistical product SPSS 16. A critical level of significance 0.05 was used. Results: Almost half (47%) of the respondents agree that the children born from gamete donors have the right to know at adulthood their biological parents, 35% disagree and 18% have no opinion. The demographic features influencing the answers of the question are the gender, the education and the family status of the respondents (p < 0.05). Most of the men (60%) consider that the children have the right to know their biological parents while only 44% of the women approve. The highest support of the idea about contact between the donors and their genetic off springs show the people with secondary education (56%) and the most skeptical are the respondents with high non-medical education (40%). The family status influences the opinion of the respondents - the approval of the married and unmarried is 38% and 60%, respectively.

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Mingnan Liu and Florian Keusch

Agree-Disagree and Item-Specific Scales.” Public Opinion Quarterly 79: 952-975. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/poq/nfv034. Mingay, D.J. and M.T. Greenwell. 1989. “Memory Bias and Response-Order Effects.” Journal of Official Statistics 5: 253-263. Moors, G. 2003. “Diagnosing Response Style Behavior by Means of a Latent-Class Factor Approach. Socio-Demographic Correlates of Gender Role Attitudes and Perceptions of Ethnic Discrimination Reexamined.” Quality and Quantity 37: 277-302. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1024472110002

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Veronika Učakar and Alenka Kraigher

responses were collected with a five-point scale: completely disagree, mostly disagree, neither disagree nor agree, mostly agree and completely agree. 2.2 Statistical Analysis Statistical analyses were performed using the STATA package version 10.0 (Stata Statistical Software: release 10.0 College Station. TX: Stata Corporation). The responses to questions on seasonal influenza vaccination status were dichotomised, so that participants who regularly or occasionally vaccinate were coded as vaccinate (“1”) and participants who do not vaccinate anymore or were never

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Kehinde Kazeem Kanmodi, Olanrewaju Isaac Owoeye, Almu Bello and Linda Ekele Iyadi

on: [1] the participants’ assumption on ‘reading too much’ as a cause of severe mental illness (madness), using a 5-point Likert scale (strongly agree [SA], agree [A], undecided [U], disagree [D], strongly disagree [SD]); [2] the self-rating of the participants’ academic performance in their current course of study, using a 5-point Likert scale (poor, average, good, very good, excellent); [3] and the number of times the participants sat for the exams (O’level exam and current school entrance exam) that qualified them to getting admitted into their current course of

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Manal Hamed Mahmoud and Zizi Fikry Mohamed Abdelrasol

) consisted of obstacles to EBP scale, which were adapted from Funk et al. 19 It is a Likert-type scale with five options: strongly agree, agree, unsure, disagree, and strongly disagree. It contained obstacles that impede nurses from the utilization of EBP in the patient care. The scale was divided into four parts: the first part included nine obstacles related to individual characteristics, the second part contained nine obstacles allied to organization limitations, the third part consisted of seven obstacles linked to research qualities, and the fourth part comprised