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Religion and gender inequality: The status of women in the societies of world religions

References: Adherents.com (2013): National and World Religion Statistics – Church Statistics – World Religions [online]. [cit. 17.01.2013]. Available at: URL: http://www.adherents.com AITCHISON, C. [eds.]. (2007): Geographies of Muslim identities: diaspora, gender and belonging. Ashgate, Aldershot. BILEZIKIAN, G. (2006): Beyond Sex Roles: What the Bible says about a Woman's Place in Church and Family. Baker Academic. CABEZÓN, I. (1992): Buddhism, Sexuality, and Gender. Albany, State University of New York Press. Census of India

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Advertisement in the Perspective of World Religions – from Negation to Necessary Acceptance

Abstract

There are a few factors which influence the awareness and culture of the modern man. The most essentials include: religions, developing globalization and advertisements. The mentioned elements are related to each other and mutually restricted. Authors of advertisements still often use elements of religious life in order to encourage customers to buy particular products or make them loyal to a particular brand. Developing globalization allows for using multicultural elements, including the elements related to all major religions. We should point out that religions which promote self-restriction, renouncement and devotion remain in opposition to the developing advertising industry. In this world of advertisement, which seems unavoidable, religions have no choice but accept them. By setting forth justified ideas they make people think over the methods and limits of using religious elements in advertisements of products.

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Old and New Criteria for the Governance of Political and Economic Structures on the Basis of the Bible and the Quran

Abstract

This study presents a sociological analysis of the Holy Books of two world religions (the Bible and the Quran) since, according to prognoses and risk analyses, a political, economic, cultural, and religious confrontation between the world religions will be unavoidable. Special economic and political aspects also contribute to the up-to-datedness of the topic in the democratic world; in fact: the economic crisis at the beginning of the 21st century, the difficulties of managing the crisis with traditional micro- and macroeconomic tools as well as the Europe-wide issue of migration processes. These challenges have directed our attention to alternative economic solutions and policy options, including theories on ethical basis. Modern academic discourse has recently started to direct research at leadership skills as acknowledged forms of talent. The priority of moral talent is never disputed in the Bible and the Quran, more so by certain leaders holding political or economic positions.

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Becoming a Follower of Christ: Exploring Conversion Through Historical and Missiological Lenses

Abstract

Conversion is a critical part of Evangelical theology and missiology. It has been defined as a crisis experience or a decision at a specific point in time. However, there is always an aspect of development, a process, involved. Increasingly, the phenomenon of conversion of those from non-Christian backgrounds, for example from other world religions, indicates that how they become followers of Christ is often characterised by a gradual journey, sometimes accompanied by visions and dreams. This paper looks at the phenomenon of conversion through a historical and missiological lens to explain and understand the dynamics of the conversion.

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Religious Belief is Not Natural. Why Cognitive Science of Religion Does Not Show That Religious Belief is Trustworthy

Abstract

It is widely acknowledged that the new emerging discipline cognitive science of religion has a bearing on how to think about the epistemic status of religious beliefs. Both defenders and opponents of the rationality of religious belief have used cognitive theories of religion to argue for their point. This paper will look at the defender-side of the debate. I will discuss an often used argument in favor of the trustworthiness of religious beliefs, stating that cognitive science of religion shows that religious beliefs are natural and natural beliefs ought to be trusted in the absence of counterevidence. This argument received its most influential defense from Justin Barrett in a number of papers, some in collaboration with Kelly James Clark. I will discuss their version of the argument and argue that it fails because the natural beliefs discovered by cognitive scientists of religion are not the religious beliefs of the major world religions. A survey of the evidence from cognitive science of religion will show that cognitive science does show that other beliefs come natural and that these can thus be deemed trustworthy in the absence of counterevidence. These beliefs are teleological beliefs, afterlife beliefs and animistic theistic beliefs.

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Moral Neutrality of Religion in the Light of Conflicts and Violence in Mediatized World

Religion Cause Violence? Harvard Divinity Bulletin, 35 (2 &3). COHEN A. B., KOENIG H. G. (2004). Religion and Mental Health,Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology, vol. 3, 255-258. COPAN P., FLANNAGAN, M. (2014). Did God really command Genocide?Michigan, Baker Books. DORN A. W. (2010). The Justifications for War and Peace in World Religions. Part III: Comparison of Scriptures from Seven World Religions, Defence R&D Canada – TorontoContract Report, DRDC Toronto CR 2010-036, March. EIBL-EIBESFELDT, I. (1971). Love and Hate, London, Methuen

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The golden rule of morality – an ethical paradox

Reciprocity in World Religions. London & New York: Continuum. JASNOW, R. (1992): A Late Period Hieratic Wisdom Text (P. Brooklyn 47.218.135). Chicago: The Oriental Institute. KALAJTZIDIS, J. (2013): Ethics of social consequences as a contemporary consequentialist theory. In: Ethics & Bioethics (in Central Europe), 3(3-4), pp. 159-171. KANT, I. (2017): Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, trans. T. K. Abbott. Digireads.com Publishing. LEE, A. & MUSINGS, E. (2013): A Decalogue for the Modern World, [online

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A Retrospective Introduction to Religious Education: An Interpretive Approach

you be a Muslim and not believe in God? How fluid or solid are religions? Introducing viscosity to the interpretive approach. In J. Miller, K. O’Grady, & U. McKenna (Eds.), Religion in education: Innovation in international research (pp. 167–181). Routledge: New York and London. Jackson, R. (1982) Commitment and the teaching of world religions. In R. Jackson (Ed.), Approaching world religions (pp. 89–100). London: John Murray. Jackson, R. (1989). Religions through festivals: Hinduism . London: Longman. Jackson, R. (1990). Children as

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Imagined Religious Communities and the “Culture of Bible-Readers”: Hinduism’s Challenge to European Religious Studies

. San Francisco: Harper San Francisco, ISBN 0-06-064780-9. KNOTT, K. 2000. Hinduism: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-285387-2. KÜNG, H. with J. VAN ESS, H. VON STIETENCRON, and H. BECHERT. 1985. Christianity and the World Religions: Paths to Dialogue with Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. New York: Doubleday, ISBN 0-385-19471-4. LIPNER, J. 2010. Hindus: Their religious beliefs and practices. Second edition. Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, ISBN 978-0-415-45677-7. MALIK, A

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The logical challenge of negative theology

References E. Benor, “Meaning and Reference in Maimonides’ Negative Theology”, The Harvard Theological Review, vol. 88 (1995), pp. 339-360. J. M. Bocheński, The Logic of Region, New York University Press, New Yourk 1965. J. Bowker, The Oxford Dictionary of World Religions, Oxford University Press, Oxford 1997. B. Brogaard, J. Salerno, “Fitch’s Paradox of Knowability”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2013 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = http

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