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Topography of Spoil Heaps and Its Role in Plant Succession and Soil Fauna Presence

Agroecosystems, 67, 67-74. doi: 10.1023/A:1025143809825. Brown VK, Gange AC (1989): Herbivory by soil-dwelling insects depresses plant species richness. Functional Ecology, 3, 667. doi: 10.2307/2389498. Brown VK, Gange AC (1992): Secondary plant succession: how is it modified by insect herbivory? Vegetatio, 101, 3-13. doi: 10.1007/BF00031910. Campbell RE (1937): Temperature and moisture preferences of wireworms. Ecology, 18, 479-489. Ciarkowska K, Gargiulo L, Mele G (2016): Natural restoration of soils on mine

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Wireworms (Elateridae) occurring in decaying birch (Betula spp.) wood in the Kampinos National Park

Larwy sprężykowatych (Elateridae) występujące w próchnie brzóz (Betula spp.) na terenie Kampinoskiego Parku Narodowego

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Analysing quality deficiencies of three potato cultivars during the storage period

Rhizoctonia solani, wireworms (Agriotes ssp.) and slugs (Deroceras reticulatum, Arion hortensis) in different farming systems. Field Crops Res. 128, 147-155. [7] Runno-Paurson, E., Loit, K., Hansen, M., Tein, B., Williams, I. H., Mänd, M. (2015), Early blight destroys potato foliage in the northern Baltic region. Acta Agr. Scand. B-S P 65(5), 422-432. [8] Bengtsson, T., Holefors, A., Liljeroth, E., Hultberg, M., Andreasson, E. (2015), Biosurfactants have the potential to induce defence against Phytophthora infestans in potato. Potato Res. 58

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Principal Insects Affecting Tobacco Plants in the Field

(1932) 291–465. DOI: 10.5962/bhl.part.24287 249. Chamberlin, F.S. and A.H. Madden: Insect Pests of Cigar-Type Tobaccos in the Southern Districts; Circular No. 639, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC, USA, 1942. 250. Creighton, C.S., W.S. Kinard, and N. Allen: The Southern Potato Wireworm, a New Pest of Tobacco; J. Econ. Entomol. 56 (1963) 292–294. DOI: 10.1093/jee/56.3.292 251. Day, A., F.P. Cuthbert Jr, and W.J. Reid Jr: The Southern Potato Wireworm. Its Biology and Economic Importance in Coastal South Carolina; South Carolina

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Phytophagous Entomofauna of Tomato, Paprika and Eggplant Occurring on Plantations in Poland in 1919-2010

Phytophagous Entomofauna of Tomato, Paprika and Eggplant Occurring on Plantations in Poland in 1919-2010

In Poland, in the years 1919-2010, in field crops of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) and eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) there were found 52 phytophagous species belonging to 6 orders of insects: Orthoptera, Thysanoptera, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. The number of pest species occurring on the different crops was: tomato - 39, paprika - 41, eggplant - 27.

The presented phytophagous entomofauna proved to be stable in terms of species composition over the years of observations. However, there was a significant variation in population size, which was subject to considerable fluctuations in successive growing seasons.

The dominant species posing a threat to plantations every year included: for tomato: Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), soil pests: cutworm (Agrotis sp), wireworms (Agriotes sp) and white grubs (Melolontha sp); for paprika: onion thrips (Thrips tabaci), green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), bugs (Lygus sp.); for eggplant: green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), Colorado beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineatas), onion thrips (Thrips tabaci).

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Phytophagous Entomofauna Occurring On Carrot and Plant Protection Methods

Phytophagous Entomofauna Occurring On Carrot and Plant Protection Methods

Over 34 phytophagous species were noted on carrot plantations in Poland. Most of them are oligo- and polyphagous species, occurring in populations, which pose permanent threat for carrot plantations.

Basing on occurrence frequency and quantity, the identified species were classified into 3 groups.

I group. Species causing significant economic losses: carrot fly (Chamaepsila rosae Fabr.), root aphids (Pemphigus phenax B&B), cutworm (Agrotis spp.), Semiaphis dauci, hawthorn carrot aphid (Dysaphis crataegi Kalt.), lygus bug (Lygus spp.).

II group. Species infesting plantations in cyclic intervals of several years: black been aphid (Aphis fabae Scop.), psyllid (Trioza viridula Zett.), Depressaria nervosa Haw., D. depresella Hb., D. heracliana DeGeer, wireworms (Agriotes spp.), white grubs (Melolonthinae)

III group. Species occurring sporadically in numbers, which may pose a threat to plants: knot grass (Acronicta rumicis L.), Mamestra dissimilis Knoch., M. persicariae L., Autographa gamma L.

Monitoring of pests presence and threats caused by them is conducted by constantly developed system of short- and long-term forecasting. It includes the species harmful to plantations every year or cyclically, which need to be controlled. Treatment times are established based on signalisation of pest presence on plantation, using yellow sticky cards (Chamapsila rosae), pheromone traps (Agrotis segetum) or periodic inspection of plantation to evaluate threshold value (other species).

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Researches on the protection of maize crops against soil pests

calităţii boabelor la hibrizi de porumb din diferite grupe de maturitate FAO (The variabiity in production capacity and qnd quality of grain maize hybrids from different FAO maturity groups). Analele I.N.C.D.A Fundulea, București,vol. LXXVIII, nr. 1. Popov C., Bărbulescu Al., Roşca I., Alexandri A.A., Preoteasa Vera, 2001 - Control of wireworms ( Agriotes spp.) in some field crops sedd treatment in Romania. XXI IWGO Conference; VIII Diabrotica subgroup Meeting Proceedings, Padova, Italia, 377 - 386. Popov C., 2002 - Cercetări privind

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Effect of chestnut tannins on the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica

and soil. In: Lamberti, F., Taylor, C. E. (Eds.) Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne species), Systematics, Biology and Control. London, UK: Academic Press, pp. 317–329 [6] D’addabbo, T., Sasanelli, N., Lamberti, F., Carella, A. (2000): Control of root-knot nematodes by olive and grape pomace soil amendments. Acta Hortic., 532: 53–57 [7] Elberson, L. R., Borek, V., Mccaffrey, J. P., Morra, M. J. (1996): Toxicity of rapeseed meal-amended soil to wireworms, Limonius californicus (Coleoptera: Elateridae). J. Agr

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Can pre-colonisation of the soil substrate increase the efficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae)?

-84. Daane KM, Williams LE (2003): Manipulating vineyard irrigation amounts to reduce insect pest damage. Ecol Appl 13: 1650-1666. Ehlers RU (2001): Mass production of entomopathogenic nematodes for plant protection. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 56: 623-633. Eidt DC, Thurston GS (1995): Physical deterrents to infection by entomopathogenic nematodes in wireworm (Coleoptera: Elateridae) and other soil pests. Can Entomol 127: 423-429. Fan X, Hominick WM (1991): Effects of low storage temperature on

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