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Abstract

This paper presents a sociological analysis of the image of a “good village”, as portrayed in the annual Czech competition Village of the Year. It focuses on the positive representations attached to the rural in the political and expert discourse. The analysis is rooted in cultural rural sociology and in its study of rural idyll. It is argued that a specific kind of rural idyll is produced in the competition. This idyll is analysed using the photographs submitted to the competition by the villages themselves. A combination of visual methods is employed to uncover the positive values attached to the images. The results show that activity and social life play a key role in the image of a “good village” thus produced. On the other hand, there are virtually no references to agriculture.

Abstract

Like many other world literatures, the English literature of the last few decades has been marked by an intensive search for new narrative techniques, for innovative ways and means of arranging a plot and portraying characters. The search has resulted, among other things, into merging literature with visual arts like painting, film and photography. This phenomenon got the name of ekphrasis and has become a popular field of literary research lately.

Suffice it to cast a glance at several of the novels published around the year 2000 to see that incorporation of photographic images into fiction allows writers to use new means of organizing literary texts, to employ non-conventional devices of structuring a plot and delineating personages as well as to pose various problems of aesthetic, ethical, ideological nature.

We suggest to look briefly at seven novels published in the last three decades to see the various roles assigned to photography by their authors: Out of this World (1988) by Graham Swift, Ulverton (1992) by Adam Thorpe, Master Georgie (1998) by Beryl Bainbridge, The Dark Room (2001) by Rachel Seiffert, The Photograph (2003) by Penelope Lively, Double Vision (2003) by Pat Barker and The Rain Before It Falls (2007) by Jonathan Coe.

The scenes of the novels are set widely apart and have time spans of various duration. Ulverton and Master Georgie have a mid-19th century setting, The Dark Room is centered round WWII, Out of this World and The Rain before It Falls contain their heroes’ long life stories, while The Photograph and Double Vision are set at the end of the last century and their characters are our contemporaries. The novels also differ by the particular place photographs occur in the novels, by the roles they play there, as well as by the issues associated with them.

in CLEaR

. Representations in mental imagery and working memory: evidence from different types of visual masks. Memory and Cognition 40(2): 204–17. Brockmole, James; Wang, Ranxiao Frances; Irwin, David. 2002. Temporal integration between visual images and visual percepts. Journal of Experimental Psychology 28: 315–34. Brogaard, Berit; Gatzia, Dimitria. 2017. Unconscious imagination and the mental imagery debate. Frontiers in Psychology 8(799): 1–14. Bronfman, Zohar; Brezis, Noam; Jacobson, Hilla; Usher, Marius. 2014. We see more than we can report: ‘cost free’ color phenomenality

Abstract

In this paper, I describe several distinct visualizations that I recognize in Jewish prayers. By the term prayers, I mean the texts recited by Jews in religious ritual contexts. By the term visualizations, I mean the formation of mental visual images of a place and time, of a narrative activity or scene, or of an inner disposition. The goals of the visualizations can include: (1) professed communication with God, articulation of common religious values for (2) personal satisfaction or for (3) the sake of social solidarity, or (4) attainment of altered inner emotional states or moods.

Abstract

The following article presents researches aimed at the evaluation of precision in determining a ship’s position through comparing a omnidirectional map image to a real vision image of the coast line. The first part establishes the thesis and preparatory forms in conducting the research. It also presents designed and built equipment including a research tool software. A system equipped with a spherical catadioptric camera that aids data collection on board ship designated to processing and analyzing data collected on board in connection with the spherical images of an electronic navigational chart with a software module. The second part explains procedures followed in conducting the research. The foreword note explains the procedure in data collection aboard a ship maneuvering in the port after which the algorithm for position placement and precise parametrical count was presented. The concluding part shows analyses of obtained research result. It bears a performance on the evaluation of precision at determining position. As a measure, an average error value and distance fluctuation of obtained position from referential position. As our conclusion, primary agents having rudimentary influence on the quality of correlating spherical map image to coastline visual image were characterized.

Abstract

Since “we live in a culture of confession” (Gilmore 2001: 2; Rak 2005: 2) a rapidly growing popularity of various forms of life writing seems understandable. The question of memory is usually an important part of the majority of autobiographical texts. Taking into account both the popularity of life writing genres and their recent proliferation, it is interesting to see how the question “what would we be without memory?” (Sebald 1998 [1995]: 255) resonates within more experimental auto/biographical texts such as a graphic memoir/novel I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors (2006) by Bernice Eisenstein and a volume of illustrated poetry and a biographical elegy published together as Correspondences (2013) by Anne Michaels and Bernice Eisenstein. These two experimental works, though representing disparate forms of writing, offer new stances on visualization of memory and correspondences between text and visual image. The aim of this paper is to analyze the ways in which the two authors discuss memory as a fluid concept yet, at the same time, one having its strong, ghostly presence. The discussion will also focus on the interplay between memory and postmemory as well as correspondences between the texts and the equally important visual forms accompanying them such as drawings, portraits, sketches, and the bookbinding itself.

Abstract

The search and detection of objects under water is carried out by groups of specialised divers. However, their time underwater and their ability to penetrate the depths are limited. For these reasons, the use of unmanned underwater vehicles equipped with technical observation equipment, including TV cameras, is becoming increasingly popular for these tasks. Video images from cameras installed on vehicles are used to identify and classify underwater objects. The process of recognition and identification of objects is tedious and difficult and requires the analysis of numerous sequences of images, and so it is desirable to automate this process. In response to these needs, this article presents the concept of identification of underwater objects based on visual images from an underwater body of water sent from an unmanned underwater vehicle to a base vessel. The methods of initial processing of the observed images from an underwater area as well as the method of searching for selected objects in these images and their identification with the use of the Hough transform will be described. Furthermore, the paper presents the results of the preliminary processing and identification of the observed images following a deconvolution operation.

Abstract

The advertising image has become a part of our daily life; it is the main method of marketing in society, which encourages and finally, persuades people to purchase goods and services. A picture is worth a thousand words, and the visual image has gained supremacy over all other communication means. Advertising contributes to the development of the economy by increasing demand and by sustaining economic activities. It determines people to consume more and thereby improves their standard of living. The brand images are capable of instantly catching consumers’ attention and are the influential devices that make people aware of the quality of a product. As a resistance movement, the adbusters assumed the mission to reveal the true face of the advertising message, and thus express disapproval of those who hunt their potential buyers so aggressively. Advertising experts are competing every year in improving institutions’ image strategies, making them more and more innovative and creative in order to sell their products and services and succeed in their field. Recent statistics confirm that the new marketing trend is all about the visual message. It’s importance is predicted to grow in the following years: an estimated 84% of communications are estimated to be visual by 2018

Abstract

In the final scene of Michel Tournier’s postcolonial novel La Goutte d’or (1986), the protagonist, Idriss, shatters the glass of a Cristobal & Co. storefront window while operating a jackhammer in the working-class Parisian neighbourhood on the Rue de la Goutte d’or. Glass fragments fly everywhere as the Parisian police arrive. In La Goutte d’or, Tournier explores the identity construction of Idriss through a discussion of the role that visual images play in the development of a twentieth-century consciousness of the “Other.” At the beginning of the novel, a French tourist takes a photograph of Idriss during her visit to the Sahara. The boy’s quest to reclaim his stolen image leads him from the Sahara to Marseille, and finally to the Rue de la Goutte d’or in Paris. The Rue de la Goutte d’or remains one the most cosmopolitan neighbourhoods of the city.

In Tournier’s novel, the goutte d’or also corresponds to a symbolic object: a Berber jewel. It is the jewel that Idriss brings with him, but which he also subsequently loses upon his arrival in Marseille. From the very moment that the French tourist photographs him, a marginalization of Idriss’s identity occurs. Marginality, quite literally, refers to the spatial property of a location in which something is situated. Figuratively speaking, marginality suggests something that is on the edges or at the outer limits of social acceptability. In this essay, I explore the construction of the marginalized postcolonial self (the “Other”) through an examination of the function of visual representation in the development of a postcolonial identity in La Goutte d’or. In the end, I conclude that the construction of a postcolonial identity is based upon fragmentation and marginalization, which ultimately leads its subject to create an identity based upon false constructions.

References Cohn, Neil. 2010. “Japanese Visual Language: The Structure of Manga”. Manga: An Anthology of Global and Cultural Perspectives. Toni Johnson-Woods (Ed.). New York: Continuum, pp. 187-203. Feng, Dezheng and O’Halloran, Kay L. 2012. “Representing emotive meaning in visual images: A social semiotic approach”. Journal of Pragmatics (44), pp. 2067-2084 [Online]. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2012.10.003 [Accessed 2013, June 4]. Johnson-Woods, Toni (Ed.) 2010. “Introduction” to Manga: An Anthology of Global and Cultural Perspectives. New York