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Mechanical Properties and Biocompatibility of a Biomaterial Based on Deproteinized Hydroxyapatite and Endodentine Cement

Abstract

Hydroxyapatite is used for bone reconstruction, in order to improve its mechanical properties different substances can be added. In our study new biomaterial is created from deproteinised hydroxyaptite and endodentic cement, its mechanical properties were tested. Material was implanted subcutaneous in rats, then histological and biocompatability tests were performed. Results indicate that stuff has good mechanical properties, short setting time and gradual resorption creating porosity and ability to integrate in bone.

Open access
Experimental Investigation on Punching Behavior of Thick Reinforced Concrete Slabs

Abstract

The results of experimental test of nine thickset reinforced concrete slabs in punching are presented in the this paper. The aim of the tests was verification of the Eurocode EC 2 procedure, by which the ultimate shear stresses vRd,c depend on the slenderness of the slab. Besides of the performed tests results, the analysis of the foreign investigation of the fundaments is also included. The test results, as well as other tests, show the correctness of the function assumed in Eurocode 2, which gives correlation between ultimate stresses vRd,c and shear slenderness.

Open access
Dose-Dependent Influence of Dietary Cu-Glycine Complex on Bone and Hyaline Cartilage Development in Adolescent Rats

Abstract

Administration of the amino acid copper (Cu) complex ensures higher Cu bioavailability through enhanced absorption from intestine and decreases the dietary Cu level, compared to the recommended Cu dose. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Cu-low diet on the bone development in adolescent rats. Male rats at the age of 6 weeks were used in the 12-week experiment. The control diet provided the required Cu level from sulfate (S-Cu) and other diets were supplemented with Cu as a glycine complex (Cu-Gly) at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of daily requirement. After the 12-week treatment, rats from the Cu-Gly100 group were heavier, compared to the other groups. The copper and calcium plasma and bone concentrations of the rats in the groups treated with the organic form of Cu (irrespective of its dose) was similar to the control values noted in the rats administered with S-Cu. A decrease in the femur weight and length was observed in the Cu-Gly75 and Cu-Gly50 groups. Cu-Gly increased the cross section area, mean relative wall thickness, and cortical index only in the Cu-Gly75 group. A decrease in the ultimate strength, elastic stress, and ultimate stress was noted in the Cu-Gly100 and Cu-Gly75 groups. In the Cu-Gly50 group, a decrease in the ultimate stress and an increase in the maximal elastic strength and bending moment were noted. Adolescent rats treated with Cu-Gly at a Cu-deficient level exhibited a dose-dependent strongly osteoporotic cancellous bone. Lower proteoglycan content was found in groups fed the Cu-low diet. In the control rats supplemented with S-Cu, there was no evident gradient in safranin O staining. It is difficult to indicate which dose of the Cu-Gly complex among the investigated Cu-poor diet exerted a positive effect on bone metabolism. It appears that the use of this Cu-Gly complex at a significantly reduced dose than S-Cu at the recommended dose did not inhibit the development of bone and hyaline cartilage in adolescent rats.

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Construction and Monitoring of Cement/Bentonite Cutoff Walls: Case Study of Karkheh Dam, Iran

fine aggregates of 0~10 mm has lower values of ultimate stress, Young’s modulus, and ductility in which the loading rate remained constant. Fig. 7 (b) shows that the compressive strength, and consequently, the Young’s modulus (curve slope) increase due to reduced loading speed. Moreover, failure occurs in lower strains at higher loading speeds. Due to the low speed of loading during the construction of cutoff walls, the plastic concrete demonstrates higher plasticity compared to those of testing specimens in labs. The Young’s modulus is calculated with this

Open access