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Intonation and Particles as Speech Act Modifiers: A Syntactic Analysis

References Anderson, Stephen R. 1971. On the linguistic status of the performative/constative distinction . Bloomington: Indiana University Linguistics Club. Avis, Walter. S. 1972. So eh? is Canadian, eh. Canadian journal of linguistics 17(2). 89–104. Bach, Kent & Robert Harnish. 1979. Linguistic communication and speech acts . Cambridge, MA: MIT press. Bartels Christine. 1999. The intonation of English statements and questions . New York: Garland Publishing. Beyssade, Claire & Jean-Marie Marandin. 2006. The speech act

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Speech Act of Threat in Everyday Conflict Discourse: Production and Perception

in conflict discourse. In Philology &culture , 2 (44), p. 122-125. / Sadykova I.A. Etnorechevyye zaprety v structure konfliktnogo diskursa. In Filologiya i kultura , 2 (44), s. 122-125. / Садыкова И.А. Этноречевые запреты в структуре конфликтного дискурса. In Филология и культура , 2 (44), c. 122-125. Salgueiro, A.B. (2010). Promises, threats, and the foundations of speech act theory. In Pragmatics , 20 (2), p. 213-228. Available at: https://journals.linguisticsociety.org/elanguage/pragmatics/article/download/2569/2569-5290-1-PB.pdf Sami, S. (2015

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Salvation and Speech Act. Reading Luther with the Aid of Searle’s Analysis of Declarations

References Bayer O (2008) Martin Luther’s Theology. A Contemporary Interpretation. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans. Botha E (2007) Speech Act Theory and Biblical Interpretation. Neotestamentica 41(2): 274-294. Cary P (2005) Why Luther is not Quite Protestant: The Logic of Faith in a Sacramental Promise. Pro Ecclesia 14(4): 447-486. Cary P (2007) Sola Fide: Luther and Calvin. In 30th Annual Symposium on the Lutheran Confessions, Fort Wayne, IN, 17-19 January 2007. Ebeling G (1964) The

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Speech Act Theory and the Study of Argumentation

discussions. A theoretical model for the analysis of discussions directed to- wards solving conflicts of opinion. Dordrecht/Cinnaminson: Foris Publica- tions, PDA 1. Eemeren, F.H. van, & Grootendorst, R. (1989). Speech act conditions as tools for reconstructing argumentative discourse. Argumentation, 3, 367-383. Eemeren, F.H. van, & Grootendorst, R. (1991). The study of argumentation from a speech act perspective. In J. Verschueren (Ed.), Pragmatics at issue. Se- lected papers of the international pragmatics conference, 1987 (pp. 151

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A Cross-Cultural Approach to Speech-Act-Sets: The Case of Apologies

pragmatic aspects of the process of communication and their relevance to language pedagogy. Topics in Linguistics , no. 1, pp.53-57. OLSHTAIN, E. and COHEN, A., 1990. The learning of complex speech act behaviour. TESL Canada Journal/Revue TESL du Canada , vol. 7, no.2, pp. 45-65. COULMAS, F. ed., 1981. Conversational routine: Exploration in standardized communicative situations and prepatterned speech. The Hague, Paris and New York: Mouton Publishers. EDMONDSON, W., 1981. ‘On saying you're sorry’. In: F. Coulmas, ed. Conversational routine: Exploration in

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Politeness strategies in written communications: the issue of Iranian EFL learners

References Achiba, M. (2003). Learning to request in a second language: A study of Child interlanguage pragmatics .(Vol. 2). Multilingual Matters. Blum-Kulka, S. & Olshtain, E. (1984). Requests and Apologies: A Cross-Cultural Study of Speech Act Realization Patterns(CCSARP). Applied linguistics, 5 (3), 196-213. Blum-Kulka, S. & Olshtain, E. (1986). Too many words: Length of utterance and pragmatic failure. Studies in second language acquisition, 8 (02), 165-179. Brown, P. & Levinson, S. C. (1987). Politeness: Some universals in

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Wilt Thou Be Lord of all the World? Modals and Persuasion in Shakespeare

ABSTRACT

Persuasion is defined as human communication designed to influence the judgements and actions of others (Simons & Jones 2011). The purpose of this research is to analyse the discourse of persuasion in Shakespeare from the perspective of historical pragmatics (Jucker & Taavitsainen 2010), with particular attention to modals employed as part of the strategies. The modals under investigation are proximal and distal central modals, SHALL/SHOULD, WILL/WOULD, CAN/COULD, MAY/MIGHT, MUST, and the contracted form ’LL. The data for the present study is drawn from The Riverside Shakespeare (Evans 1997) and the concordance by Spevack (1968-1980). The corpus includes both cases where the persuasion attempt is successful and unsuccessful.

After defining persuasion in comparison to speech acts, quantitative analysis reveals how frequently the persuader and the persuadee employ a modal regarding each type of modality and speech act. Further analysis shows in what manner the persuader and the persuadee interact with each other in discourse resorting to the following strategies: modality, proximal and distal meanings of the modal, speech act of each utterance including a modal, and use of the same modal or switching modals in interaction.

This research thus clarifies how effectively speakers attempted to persuade others in interactions, shedding light on communication mechanisms in the past.

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Securitization of the Migration Crisis and Islamophobic Rhetoric: The 2016 Slovak Parliamentary Elections as a Case Study

policy discourse, which is analyzed here. First, I present the research design of my paper (research methods and research question; sources of data) and after that I turn to the basic theoretical framework of this paper: theory of securitization. Finally, I reflect the key point of this theory – speech act. I will not reflect all speech acts in political or societal discourse but focus on those that manifested anti-Muslim rhetoric. Lastly, in the analytical part of my paper, I will introduce my findings about the characteristics of securitization of Islamophobia during

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The meaning and development of the Hebrew scalar modifier kexol

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is twofold; first, it aims to explore the variety of interpretations of the partially schematic Hebrew construction kexol as in kexol she’ratsiti (‘as much as I wanted’) within the framework of construction grammar; second, it aims to account for this variety through a demonstration of the interrelation between the grammaticalization of the construction and the process of (inter)subjectification or speech-act orientation. The analysis will show that this interrelation has resulted in considerable internal variation in meaning and function in the present day. Corpus findings reveal that initially kexol functioned as a compound consisting of a preposition and a universal quantifier to denote a relation of similarity and comparison. As a result of speaker orientation, the construction has come to exhibit a higher degree of grammaticality in its function as a scalar modifier. Additional schematic and procedural meanings which developed later seem to be the result of hearer-orientation and discourse-orientation tendencies all subsumed under the cover term speech-act orientation

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On Multiple Metonymies Within Indirect Speech Acts

On Multiple Metonymies Within Indirect Speech Acts

Indirect speech acts are frequently structured by more than a single metonymy. The metonymies are related not only to the illocutionary force of the utterances, but also function within the individual lexemes being their parts. An indirect speech act can thus involve not only multiple, but also multi-levelled operation of conceptual metonymy.

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