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ask? Gender effectiveness of “tough” vs. “soft” compliance-gaining strategies. Social Influence, 1(1): 48-57, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1553451 0500314571. Doliński, D., Grzyb, T., Olejnik, J., Prusakowski, S. and Urban, K. (2002). Dialog jako metatechnika wpływu społecznego. Tryb komunikacji a efektywność techniki „liczy się każdy grosz”. Studia Psychologiczne, 40(3): 127-152. Doliński, D., Grzyb, T., Olejnik, J., Prusakowski, S. and Urban, K. (2005). Let’s dialogue about penny. Efectiveness of dialogue involvement and legitimizing paltry contribution techniques

normative social influence in buyer behavior. Journal of Consumer Research, 206-215. Cha, J. (2009). Shopping on social networking Web sites: Attitudes toward real versus virtual items. Journal of Interactive Advertising, 10(1), 77-93. Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences: Lawrence Erlbaum. Coyle, J.R., & Thorson, E. (2001). The effects of progressive levels of interactivity and vividness in web marketing sites. Journal of advertising, 65-77. Deighton, J., & Kornfeld, L. (2009). Interactivity's Unanticipated Consequences for Marketers

Abstract

In contemporary society, propaganda has a major impact due to the new technologies in the media (satellite television, the Internet) that ensure the rapid and instant transmission of information, thus expanding the audience. The concept of propaganda acts systematically in support of a doctrine, in order to persuade a large mass of individuals. It is generally associated with a negative action, considered to be reprehensible, and this is the consequence of the attempts that various totalitarian regimes have manifested abusively. Basically, propaganda is a conscious communication act with a political and revolutionary character representing a strategy of social influence. The element of difference is misinformation. Thus, this concept can be one of integration and consolidation of the society or, on the contrary, it can be a factor of agitation.

). Encouraging information security behaviors in organizations: Role of penalties, pressures and perceived effectiveness. Decision Support Systems, 47 (2), 154-165. Jamal, A. A. A., Ramlan, W. K., Karim, M. A., & Osman, Z. (2015). The effects of social influence and financial literacy on savings behavior: A study on students of higher learning institutions in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 6 (11), 110-119. Joo, S.-h., & Grable, J. E. (2005). Employee education and the likelihood of having a retirement savings program. Kim, J. E

Abstract

This research analyzes cause-related marketing (CrM) from the perspective of companies. The study aims to achieve a better understanding about what managers think about CrM by analyzing the level of acceptance and usage of this marketing tool, based on the UTAUT model. Using in-depth interviews as research method, we conclude that managers see the benefit of company partaken in initiatives as such, but not necessarily CrM. The reasons why managers choose to participate in Cause-related Marketing initiatives originate from the mix obtained through improving the firm by doing something considered socially positive. CrM was well evaluated by the participants and considered well positioned in terms of acceptance and usage, based on four factors: performance and effort expectancy, social influence, and facilitating conditions. Interviewees expressed excitement towards CrM and believe in it as a powerful tool to improve the firms’ image and consumers feeling towards it. While the literature uses several concepts (Corporate Social Responsibility or Social Marketing), the interviewees emphasize genuine caring and showing interest, time and funds to support consumers social concerns.

Kiesler, S. (1996). The kindness of strangers: The usefulness of electronic weak ties for technical advice. Organization Science , 7(2), 119-137. 11. Davis, F. D., Bagozzi, R. P., & Warshaw, P. R. (1989). User acceptance of computer technology: a comparison of two theoretical models. Management Science , 35(8), 982-1003. 12. Demei, S., Laffey, J., Yimei, L., Xinxin, H.,(2006) Social Influence for Perceived Usefulness and Ease-of-Use of Course Delivery Systems, Journal of Interactive Online Learning Volume 5, Number 3, Winter 2006 13. Eckhardt, A., Laumer, S. and

Abstract

The paper deals with the transition of Czech students of lower secondary schools (ISCED 2A) and vocationally oriented upper secondary schools (ISCED 3A and 3C) between educational levels and to the labour market. The theoretical introduction describes the specifics of career decision making of Czech pupils and synthesizes some important empirical findings on social influences on this decision. The core lies in a survey designed by the National Institute of Education, School Counselling Centre and Centre for Further Education of Teachers. The instrument of data collection was questionnaires for students of final years of lower secondary and upper secondary schools. Data collection took place in 2011 at 40 lower secondary (n=779) and 20 vocationally oriented upper secondary schools (n=442). The paper compares the views of these groups of respondents on student’s autonomy in the choice of further education and occupation, and social influences on students’ career decision-making.

Abstract

The use of behavioural change systems in providing interventions for people is common in this present era of information technology. Many people depend on these systems for many reasons like safe driving, healthy food consumption, energy conservation, etc. Some of these systems have been successful in making people change positively while a larger percentage have not been successful due to many issues that were not addressed during the development of such systems. One of them is psychological reactance, a motivational state that is aroused when a person’s freedom is threatened or eliminated. It has major focus restoring any freedom that has been threatened. This forms the motivation for this work and it starts with a brief study of the theory of psychological reactance with a new view of accessing it from perceived usability perspective. To study reactance in people, a survey was conducted. It focussed on accessing reactance through attitudes to forced compliance in a persuasive website in the context of meal-planning. Results from this study showed that participants with high freedom text had better attitude to the website in terms of anger and perceived usability than participants with low-freedom text. This work confirmed the social agency proposition that the presence of social cues in a multimedia message can stimulate the social interaction pattern in people’s learning. Once this social interaction pattern is initiated, there is a high possibility for pupils to act as if they are interacting with another individual. Therefore, to some degree, social convention of human-to-human interaction sets in as participants with high freedom message had a lower anger score than participants with high freedom plus social message.

Abstract

Self-reports in surveys are often influenced by the presented question format and question context. Much less is known about how these effects influence the answers of younger survey respondents. The present study investigated how variations in response format, answer scale frequency, and question order influence self-reports of two age groups: younger (11–13 years old) and older (16–18 years old) adolescents. In addition, the impact of the respondents’ level of familiarity with the question content was taken into account. Results indicated that younger adolescents are more strongly influenced by the presented question format and context than older adolescents. This, however, was dependent on the particular question content, implying that response effects are more pronounced when questions deal with issues that lie outside of the respondents’ field of experience. Implications of these findings in survey research with younger respondents are discussed.

Abstract

In this article we review research from the past decade that explores how elements of communication from social media and press articles influence the decision making for choosing a travel destination. ‘Fake news’ has the potential to impact opinions, expectations and behaviour of tourism consumers. Perceived as an important threat to modern democratic societies, the course of intentional false data dissemination is able to disrupt perception and throughout the normal functioning of state institutions and private companies. Hence, manipulation of information shapes differently the image of tourism destinations, accommodation units, cruise ships and even tourist attractions mostly in order to produce higher economic benefits. Unfortunately, sometimes ‘fake news’ spreading could be detrimental to tourist destinations and operators. In order to pursue, cope, absorb and adjust threats related to ‘fake news’, we will use and approach in a later work the aspects regarding a ‘societal resilience’