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Abstract

This article investigates how director Valeria Anderson constructed heroes in the documentaries she directed between 1960 and 1985. It also asks how far one could go with social criticism in the post-Stalinist/pre-Perestroika era, how pointed the revelations of economic disorder could be, and what rank of leadership could be blamed for the occurrences of these problems. The article concentrates on the documentaries made by Valeria Anderson that depict positive heroes sacrificing their personal interests for the good of the homeland. The narratives are examined by using discourse analysis.

Abstract

This article focuses on the relationship that the famous 20th century Viennese satirist Karl Kraus had with the major newspapers, particularly Die Neue Freie Presse. The aim is to argue that the language was the main means by which Karl Kraus unmasked the hypocrisy and ideology of Bourgeois Viennese society. In language he found both the problem and the solution to his social criticism, the central points of which represent the foreshadowing of his monumental World War I-drama, The Last Days of Mankind. The analysis of two characters in the play, Alice Schalek and Moritz Benedikt, shows us how Kraus used language to expose them as archetypes of their Zeitgeist.

were the basis for the intellectual exchange which led him to write his Yiddish treatise. Keywords Isaac Wetzlar, Pietist’s Mission, Principality of Hannover, Celle, Pietism, Interreligious Exchange, Social Criticism, Jewish-Christian interaction Received 31 December 2014 Accepted 17 January 2015 The notion that Isaac Wetzlar’s Libes briv should be regarded within the context of Christian Pietism is not entirely new. Several scholars have recognized some kind of an intellectual connection as well as certain specific similarities between this Jewish ethical tract

Abstract

In order for the study of culture to be recognized as an autonomous subject, a profile of the discipline is necessary which clearly defines its purpose and its distinct, preferred goals, fields and topics. The suggestion is to establish the objectives based on three key issues: ‘What does it mean to act culturally?’, ‘What is cultural order?’ and ‘What determines cultural change?’ In the second half, I will present Hartmut Böhmes’ suggestion taking up preferred fields of cultural analytical work and supplement it with cultural sociology fields. The third part concerns a contemporary analytical profile of the study of culture, seen in society and cultural critique, especially in analysis of symbolic power.

Abstract

Female workers represent a fundamental component of the workforce to the extent that it is true that the Industrial Revolution owes them a huge debt. However, despite the unfair exploitation of many women in factories in which conditions resembled manslaughter, they have been often neglected and reduced to liminal characters by Victorian novelists. An interesting exception in the early Victorian period is represented by the writer Charlotte Elizabeth Tonna, whose fiction works as a medium of social criticism. Her semi-fictional The Wrongs of Woman is a reform novel which sheds a controversial light on female working conditions. On the one hand she indeed deplores the inhuman treatment of female labourers, but on the other hand she also argues that female employment provokes a consequent increase in male unemployment! My paper aims to investigate the role of Tonna’s text and her attempt to alleviate working-class suffering.

Abstract

The article examines three films by Roy Andersson, Songs from the Second Floor (Sånger från andra våningen, 2000), You, the Living (Du levande, 2007), and A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence (En duva satt på en gren och funderade på tillvaron, 2014). The Swedish director depicts the human condition afflicted by the loss of its humanity through a personal style that he calls “the complex image,” a tableau aesthetic that instigates social criticism, and is dependent upon long shots, immobility, unchanging shot scale, and layered compositions. The author establishes a connection between artistic and social space and scrutinizes the challenges that this “complexity” poses for the film viewer from an intermedial perspective in which cinema enters into a dialogue with two other art forms: painting and theatre. Four specific issues are discussed: (1) the intertwining of reality and artificiality as a “hyperreality;” (2) the visual compositions which are simultaneously self-contained and entirely open, highlighting a tension between volume and surface; (3) the opposition between stasis and movement, conveying a meaningful social contrast and the characters’ angst; (4) the pictoriality of the image.

Abstract

In this paper I assess how Guy Vanderhaeghe’s early fiction criticizes the class-based and civil movements of post-1960s Saskatchewan through the recurring character of Ed. The protagonist of “Man Descending” and “Sam, Soren, and Ed” from Man Descending, the uncollected “He Scores! He Shoots!” and the novel My Present Age, Ed both condemns and epitomizes the contaminated and seductive gestures of the movements’ influences and enterprises. Vanderhaeghe deploys layers of social criticism: the first comments on the new urban progressive generation—the BMW socialists—while another manifests a counter-criticism that comments on those who challenge social progress, questioning their motives and the credibility of their critique. But what is a BMW socialist? A sociopolitical chameleon hiding behind pretense? Ed describes such a creature as a former “nay-sayer and boycotter” who “intended to dedicate his life to eternal servitude in a legal-aid clinic,” but then “affluence did him in” and now “his ass [is] cupped lovingly in the contoured leather seats of his BMW” (Man Descending 237–38). Vanderhaeghe’s early works criticize the contemporary middle class and progressivist movements of the second half of the twentieth century through this sociopolitical rogue—who in turn becomes a post-rogue. For Ed is ironically undercut by a counter-narrative that is often sub-textual, resulting in a fascinating appraisal of social ignorance, immobility, and unproductivity rather than of any specific ideology.

References Anderson Sathe, Laurie. “Female Health Care Professionals: Writing Narratives and Producing Knowledge.” Diss. University of St. Thomas, 2004. Print. Greene, Maxine. Releasing the Imagination. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1995. Print. Kearney, Richard. On Stories. London: Routledge, 2002. Print. ---. “Paul Ricoeur and the Hermeneutic Imagination in the Narrative Path: The Later Works of Paul Ricoeur.” Philosophy & Social Criticism 14.2 (1988): 115-45. Print. ---. The Wake of the Imagination. Abingdon: Routledge, 1998. Print Remen, Rachel Naomi

References Allievi, S 2005, ‘How the immigrant has become Muslim. Public debates on Islam in Europe’, Revue européenne des migrations internationales, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 135-163. Al-Saji, A 2010, ‘The racialization of Muslim veils: a philosophical analysis’, Philosophy and social criticism, vol. 36, no. 8, pp. 875-902, DOI: 10.1177/0191453710375589. Andersen, ML 2003, ‘Whitewashing race: a critical review’ in Whiteout: the continuing significance of race, ed E Bonilla-Silva & W Doane, Routledge, New York pp. 21-34. AlSayyad, N & Castells, M (eds) 2002, Muslim

REFERENCES Anonymous. 1861. A few words on tours and tourism. Fraser’s Magazine 63 (March). 340–355. Anonymous. 1852. Review of Scriptural revision of the liturgy, a remedy for Anglican assumption and papal aggression. A letter to the right honourable John Russell, M.P. by a member of the Middle Temple. The North British Review 17 (August). 369–421. Arnold, Matthew. 1993 [1869]. Culture and anarchy: An essay in political and social criticism. In Stefan Collini (ed.), Arnold's Culture and anarchy and other writings . 53–212. Cambridge: Cambridge University