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Prevalence, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Molecular Typing of Thermophilic Campylobacter Spp. in a Greek Poultry Slaughterhouse

, Uyttendaele M: Campylobacter contamination in broiler carcasses and correlation with slaughterhouses operational hygiene inspection. Food Microbiol 2012, 29(1):105-112. 26. Mezher Z, Saccares S, Marcianò R, De Santis P, Rodas EMF, De Angelis V, Condoleo R: Occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in Poultry Meat at Retail and Processing Plants Levels in Central Italy. Italian Journal of Food Safety 2016, 5(1):5495. 27. Nobile CGA, Costantino R, Bianco A, Pileggi C, Pavia M: Prevalence and pattern of antibiotic resistance of Campylobacter spp. in poultry meat in

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A Slaughterhouse Survey for Porcine Circovirus Type 2 in Commercial Pigs in Ibadan, Southwest Nigeria

porcine circovirus and porcine parvovirus: immunostaining of cryostat sections and virus isolation. J. Vet. Med. , 47, 81—94. 8. Al-Qudah, K. M., Al-Majali, A. M., Obaidat, M. M., 2008: A study on pathological and microbiological conditions in goats in slaughterhouses in Jordan. Asian J. Anim. Vet. Adv. , 3, 269—274. 9. Bolin, S. R., Stoffregen, W. C., Nayar, G. P., Hamel, A. L., 2001: Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome induced after experimental inoculation of cesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets with type 2 porcine circovirus. J. Vet

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Epidemiology and antibiogram of Riemerella anatipestifer isolated from waterfowl slaughterhouses in Taiwan

Abstract

Introduction: Laryngeal swab samples collected from three waterfowl slaughterhouses in central Taiwan were cultured and suspected isolates of Riemerella anatipestifer were identified by API 20NE and 16S rDNA PCR.

Material and Methods: Serum agglutination was used for serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility was tested.

Results: Seventy-six R. anatipestifer isolates were detected, and the prevalences in the ducks and geese were 12.3% (46/375) and 8.0% (30/375), respectively. The positive isolation rates were 65.6% for all arriving waterfowl, 76.0% for birds in the holding area, 1.6% for defeathered carcasses, but zero for degummed carcasses. A PCR examination detected R. anatipestifer in the slaughtering area frequently. Serotype B was dominant in both duck (34.8%) and goose (46.7%) isolates, but the wide serotype distribution may very well impede vaccination development. All isolates were resistant to colistin, and 79.7% were resistant to more than three common antibiotics.

Conclusion: The results proved that most ducks had encountered antibiotic-resistant R. anatipestifer in rearing, which suggests that the bacterium circulates in asymptomatic waterfowl. It is worth noting that most waterfowl farms were found to harbour R. anatipestifer, and contaminated slaughterhouses are a major risk factor in its spread. Effective prevention and containment measures should be established there to interrupt the transmission chain of R. anatipestifer.

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Methane fermentation of poultry slaughterhouse waste

References Kowalski, Z. & Krupa-Żuczek, K. (2007). A model of the waste management. Polish Journal of Chemical Technology , 9, 4, pp. 91-97. DOI: 10.2478/v10026-007-0098-4. Edström, M., Nordberg, A. & Thyselius, L. (2003). Anaerobic treatment of animal byproducts from slaughter-houses at laboratory and pilot scale. Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology , Vol. 109, pp. 127-138. DOI: 10.1385/ABAB:109:1-3:127. Wzorek, Z., Konopka, M., Cholew, J., Klamecki, G. & Bajcer, T. (2007

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Presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in slaughterhouse environment, pigs, carcasses, and workers

-73. 11. Friese A., Schulz J., Hoehle L., Fetsch A., Tenhagen B.A., Hartung J., Roesler U.: Occurrence of MRSA in air and housing environment of pig barns. Vet Microbiol 2012, 158, 129-135. 12. Gilbert M.J., Bos M.E.H., Duim B., Urlings B.A.P., Heres L., Wagenaar J.A., Heederik D.J.J.: Livestock-associated MRSA ST398 carriage in pig slaughterhouse workers related to quantitative environmental exposure. Occup Environ Med 2012, 6, 472-478. 13. Guardbassi L., Stegger M., Skov R.: Retrospective detection of methicillin resistant and

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Methods and procedures for the processing of feather from poultry slaughterhouses and the application of feather meal as antioxidant

–1750. [7] K. Cotanch, S. Sniffen, H, Dann, T. Jenkins, R. Grant, Feather meal profiles studied. Feedstuffs , 78. 19. (2006) 14–24. [8] K. Cotanch, M. M. Van Amburgh, S. Sniffen, R. Grant, Intestinal digestibility of feather meal studied. Feedstuffs , 79. 28. (2007) 22–23. [9] J. Csapó, Cs. Albert, Method and procedure for processing the feather produced by poultry slaughterhouses for the application as antioxidant. 21 st International Conference of Chemistry . Şumuleu Ciuc, Romania, 23–27 September 2015. 31. [10] J. Csapó, J-né Csapó, I

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Cryopreservation of Bălțată cu Negru Românească Cattle Immature Oocytes by Slow Freezing Method: Preliminary Research

Abstract

Research on bovine oocytes cryopreservation is important for successful preservation of genetically valuable animal. The transvaginal ultrasound-guided follicular puncture coupled with in vitro embryo production has become competitive and alternative method for MOET (Multiple ovulation and embryo transfer) in dairy cattle. The aim of this preliminary research is to presents the result of Bălțată cu Negru Românească (BNR) cows oocytes recovery by two different protocols and its cryopreservation by slow freezing method. By applying the recovery oocytes from slaughterhouse ovary we obtained an average of 16.34 ± 6.71 oocytes per cow, much higher compared with the Ovum Pick Up (OPU) method, which reveals an average of 2.75 ± 0.2 oocytes per cow. After applying the slow freezing procedures using the ethylene glycol cryoprotectant we observed the oocytes with cumulus cells normal with the spherical shape and normal zone pellucida.

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High-Risk Biodegradable Waste Processing By Alkaline Hydrolysis

High-Risk Biodegradable Waste Processing By Alkaline Hydrolysis

Biodegradable waste is by definition degraded by other living organisms. Every day, meat industry produces large amounts of a specific type of biodegradable waste called slaughterhouse waste. Traditionally in Europe, this waste is recycled in rendering plants which produce meat and bone meal and fat. However, feeding animals with meat and bone meal has been banned since the outbreaks of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). In consequence, new slaughterhouse waste processing technologies have been developed, and animal wastes have now been used for energy production. Certain parts of this waste, such as brains and spinal cord, are deemed high-risk substances, because they may be infected with prions. Their treatment is therefore possible only in strictly controlled conditions. One of the methods which seems to bear acceptable health risk is alkaline hydrolysis. This paper presents the results of an alkaline hydrolysis efficiency study. It also proposes reuse of the obtained material as organic fertiliser, as is suggested by the analytical comparison between meat and bone meal and hydrolysate.

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Calicophoron daubneyi in sheep and cattle of Sardinia, Italy

provinces of Sardinia (Sassari, Nuoro, Oristano and Cagliari). Ewes (> 3 years) and cattle (both sexes) were divided into 3 groups: calves (males and females from 6 months to1 year), heifers (females from 1 to 3 years) and cows (females over 3 years old). At the slaughterhouse, rumen and reticulum were removed from each animal. These organs were examined for the presence of Paramphistomidae and classified into 2 infection levels: ≤ 100 and >100 adult parasites recovered from each animal. To perform the species identification, 10 % of the adult parasites were collected

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Occurrence of Campylobacter on carcasses of slaughtered animals between 2009 and 2013

., Bougeart S., Chemaly M.: Prevalence of and risk factors for Campylobacter spp. contamination of broiler chicken carcasses at the slaughterhouse. Food Microbiol 2010, 27, 992-999. 11. Kovalenko K., Roasto M., Liepinš E., Mäesaar M., Hörman A.: High occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in Latvian broiler chicken production. Food Control 2013, 29, 188-191. 12. Kwiatek K., Wojtoń B., Stern N.J.: Prevalence and distribution of Campylobacter spp. on poultry and selected red meat carcasses in Poland. J Food Prot 1990, 53, 127-130. 13

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