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. Prinstein MJ, Boergers J, Spirito A. Adolescents’ and their friends’ health-risk behavior: Factors that alter or add to peer influence. J Pediatr Psychol. 2001;26(5):287-98. 23. Chamova GD, Sarov GM. Direct and indirect impacts of significant others for regular alcohol use in adolescents. Trakia J Sci. 2014;12(Suppl 1):430-2. 24. White HR. Parental modeling and parenting behavior effects on offspring alcohol and cigarette use. A growth curve analysis. J Subst Abuse. 2000;12(3):287-310.

interviewing: A review and preliminary evaluation of the evidence. Addiction, 104 (4), 705-715. Apodaca, T. R., Magill, M., Longabaugh, R., Jackson, K. M., & Monti, P. M. (2013). Effect of a significant other on client change talk in motivational interviewing. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 81 (1), 35-46. Ashton, M. (2005). Motivational arm twisting - contradiction in terms? Drug and Alcohol Findings , (14), 4-19. Beattie, M. C. (2001). Meta-analysis of social relationships and post-treatment drinking outcomes: comparison of relationship structure

motivational interviewing: A review and preliminary evaluation of the evidence. Addiction, 104 (4), 705–715. Apodaca, T. R., Magill, M., Longabaugh, R., Jackson, K. M., & Monti, P. M. (2013). Effect of a significant other on client change talk in motivational interviewing. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 81 (1), 35–46. Ashton, M. (2005). Motivational arm twisting – contradiction in terms? Drug and Alcohol Findings , (14), 4–19. Beattie, M. C. (2001). Meta-analysis of social relationships and post-treatment drinking outcomes: comparison of relationship

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Abstract

AIMS - This study examines the kinds of support that alcoholics’ friends and relatives provide each other in Al-Anon mutual-aid groups. The study examines, first, the types of supportive communication in mutual-aid group meetings directed toward friends and relatives of alcoholics, and second, how contextual features affect supportive communication in these meetings. DESIGN - The research data were collected through non-participant observations of 11 group meetings and analysed by combined deductive and inductive approaches. RESULTS - Four types of support were detected: emotional, informational, esteem and social network, indicating that meetings serve as potential sources of comfort, learning, self-esteem enhancement and company. Contextual features, such as the 12-step ideology, had an effect on the content and form of supportive communication. CONCLUSION - The key to support in Al-Anon meetings lies in their discretion. That is, the way of communicating support and the contextual features of the meetings established favourable conditions for effective communication of support. The results of this study illustrate the actual communication processes exchanged by the people who have “been there”, providing information useful to anyone in contact with friends or relatives of an alcoholic.

Abstract

Our paper analyses sources of job satisfaction. A cross-sectional study in two variants: an online questionnaire (n=642) and its paper version (n=635), were used to measure the impact of core self-evaluations, hedonism and eudaimonism on job satisfaction. To strengthen the dependent variable (job satisfaction) measurement, two sources for this data were used: the target person’s self-assessment and his or her significant other’s evaluation. The results show that the significant other’s assessment can be a valuable source of information on the target person’s job satisfaction. On top of that, hierarchical regression has shown that both happiness philosophies: eudaimonism and hedonism have predictive power over the assessment of job satisfaction based on core self-evaluations.

Abstract

The paper deals with the transition of Czech students of lower secondary schools (ISCED 2A) and vocationally oriented upper secondary schools (ISCED 3A and 3C) between educational levels and to the labour market. The theoretical introduction describes the specifics of career decision making of Czech pupils and synthesizes some important empirical findings on social influences on this decision. The core lies in a survey designed by the National Institute of Education, School Counselling Centre and Centre for Further Education of Teachers. The instrument of data collection was questionnaires for students of final years of lower secondary and upper secondary schools. Data collection took place in 2011 at 40 lower secondary (n=779) and 20 vocationally oriented upper secondary schools (n=442). The paper compares the views of these groups of respondents on student’s autonomy in the choice of further education and occupation, and social influences on students’ career decision-making.