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Changes of Reaction Time and Blood Lactate Concentration of Elite Volleyball Players During a Game

References Arent SM, Landers DM. Arousal, anxiety, and performance: a reexamination of the Inverted-U hypothesis. Res Q Exerc Sport, 2003; 74: 436-444. Audiffren M, Tomporowski PD, Zagrodnik J. Acute aerobic exercise and information processing: energizing motor processes during a choice reaction time task. Acta Psychol (Amst), 2008; 129: 410-419. Aune TK, Ingvaldsen RP, Ettema GJ. Effect of physical fatigue on motor control at different skill levels. Percept Mot Skills, 2008; 106

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Asymmetry of Complex Reaction Time in Female Épée Fencers of Different Sports Classes

-351. Roi G.S., Pittaluga I. (1997). Time-motion analysis in women's th sword fencing. In 4 IOC Congress on Sport Sciences, 22-25 October 1997. Principality of Monaco. Viitasalo J.T., Komi P.V. (2008). EMG, reflex and reaction time components, muscle structure, and fatigue during intermittent isometric contractions in man. International Journal of Sports Medicine 1(4), 185-190. DOI: 10.1055/s-2008-1034657. Gursoy R., Aggon E., Stephens R., Mehmet A.Z.(2012). Comparison of the physical and biomotor characteristics, and reaction time

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Impact of Age and Agility Performance Level on the Disjunctive Reaction Time of Soccer Goalkeepers

References 1. ABERNETHY, B. et al., 2008. Expertise and Attunement to Kinematic Constraints. Perception . 37 (6): 931-948. 2. AGLIOTI, S. M., et al., 2008. Action Anticipation and Motor Resonance in Elite Basketball Players. Nature Neuroscience . 11 (9): 1109-1116. 3. ANDO, S. et al., 2001. Central and peripheral visual reaction time of soccer players and nonathletes. In: Perceptual and Motor Skills. 92 (3), 786-794. ISSN 0031-5125. 4. BABIC, M., M. HOLIENKA & M. MIKULIČ, 2018. Internal load of soccer goalkeepers during the

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Visual Perception And Its Effect On Reaction Time And Time-Movement Anticipation In Elite Female Basketball Players

Abstract

Introduction. The efficient collection and analysis of information from both the central and the peripheral field of vision may affect human coordination motor abilities. An analysis of the literature on the subject suggests that coordination motor abilities interact with one another, and it is only their combined effect that allows athletes to achieve technical mastery. The main aim of the study was to assess specific coordination motor abilities and to determine how visual perception and reaction time correlate with time-movement anticipation in elite female basketball players.

Material and methods. The study participants comprised 17 female basketball players from the Polish National Team aged 18.1 ± 0.8 years. The study involved three ability tests from the Vienna Test System: the Reaction Test (RT, S1), the Peripheral Perception test (PP), and the Time/Movement Anticipation test (ZBA, S2).

Results. The analysis of the results obtained proves that the best-developed ability in participants is reaction time, while the other abilities show average development. Study participants were able to develop their response abilities to such high levels by means of practice. A correlation coefficient was found between motor time and tracking deviation (r=0.56), and between time anticipation and the number of correct responses to stimuli appearing in the left (r=0.92) and right (r=0.88) field of vision. Athletes who achieved better results in time anticipation omitted fewer visual stimuli (r=0.7) in the peripheral field of vision. Statistically significant correlations were observed between movement anticipation and reaction time to stimuli in the central field of vision (r=0.58).

Conclusions. Perception abilities have a significant effect on time anticipation. The range of one's field of vision does not determine the reaction time to a visual stimulus. Perception efficiency and divided attention, in conjunction with time and movement anticipation, create a complex of specific psychomotor abilities that is indispensable for achieving success in team sports.

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Speed of Visual Sensorimotor Processes and Conductivity of Visual Pathway in Volleyball Players

References Allison T., Wood C. C., Goff W. R. Brain stem auditory, pattern-reversal visual, and short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials: latencies in relation to age, sex, and brain and body size. Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol , 1983. 55: 619-36 Ando S., Kida N., Oda S. Central and peripheral visual reaction time of soccer players and nonathletes. Percept Mot Skills , 2001. 92 (3): 786-794 Bhanot J. L., Sindu L. S. Comparative study of reaction time in Indian

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Estimation of simple and complex response time development using regression analysis

). Phenomena of the human motor development. Schorndorf: Hofmann. [in German] 5.Taware G.B., Bhutkar M.V., Bhutkar P.M., Doijad V.P., Surdi A.D. (2012). Effect of age on audio-visual and whole body reaction time. Al Ameen Journal of Medical Science 5(1), 90-94. 6.Bańkosz Z., Nawara H., Ociepa M. (2013). Assessment of simple reaction time in badminton players. Trends in Sport Sciences 1(20), 54-61. 7.Maćkała K., Cych P. (2011). Factors influencing the response time in teaching and perfecting low start. Rozprawy Naukowe AWF we

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Assessing Cognitive Performance in Badminton Players: A Reproducibility and Validity Study

Introduction Badminton is an interceptive, fast racket sport in terms of shuttle velocity with an average velocity reaching up to 70 m/s ( Phomsoupha and Laffaye, 2014 , 2015 ). On average six strokes are played during rallies of seven seconds and the average stroke frequency is high with approximately one shot per second ( Phomsoupha and Laffaye, 2015 ). To keep up with the high game speed, a fast reaction time is utmost important to achieve elite performance ( Loureiro and Freitas, 2012 ). The unpredictability of the opponent’s actions and the usage of

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Reaction to a Visual Stimulus: Anticipation with Steady and Dynamic Contractions

Introduction Reacting fast to visual stimuli is important for many activities of daily living and sports. In soccer, for example, the goalkeeper must react fast to save a penalty kick. The goalkeeper can anticipate a penalty kick either by remaining motionless or oscillating. Thus, an anticipatory strategy can be either steady or dynamic. However, it remains unknown whether the strategy used in anticipation to a stimulus influences the speed of the reaction. Here, we examine whether reaction time (RT) differs after a steady and a dynamic anticipatory strategy

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Acetaminophen effect on reaction speed and lower limbs power

Abstract

Background: Acetaminophen (also known as Tylenol or Paracetamol) is a very popular drug, that requires no prescription and is usually used as analgesic and antipyretic. A considerable number of previous studies show that acetaminophen has no effects that could alter exercise capacity or performance. On the other hand, there are studies sustaining that exercise performance can be improved with acetaminophen through a reduction in perceived pain, and also a reduction of the body heat produced by the muscle contraction. Purpose: The aim of our study was to check if acetaminophen influences reaction speed and power of the lower limbs muscles. Participants and method: For this study we recruited twenty-nine males, aged between 19 and 28 years old. We had two testing sessions for each participant, in the same day (the baseline evaluation, and the second evaluation at half an hour after acetaminophen ingestion). The evaluation sequence was: Body composition evaluation, acoustic-visual reaction test for one leg (left and right), Squad jump on one leg (5 jumps on each foot) and Stiffness test (7 jumps on each foot). Results: Acetaminophen has no significant influence on visual and acoustic reaction time of left or right leg. The Squat Jump test revealeda significant increase of explosive power on left leg (from 10.19±1.66 to 10.61±1.66 W/Kg, p=0.03) and right leg (10.16±1.59 W/Kg to 10.62±1.84 W/Kg, p=0.02). Another significant result of our study is the increase of reactive power (obtained during the Stiffness test) after the acetaminophen ingestion (from 16.35±4.86 to 17.53±3.79 W/Kg on left leg and from 15.92±4.2 to 17.04±4.26 W/Kg on right leg). Conclusions: Acetaminophen ingestion does not influence visual or acoustic reaction time but can improve the exercise performance through an increase in both explosive and reactive power of lower limbs.

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The effect of exercise intensity on cognitive performance during short duration treadmill running

, Davranche et al. (2015) examined the Simon task performance in 14 participants while cycling at a low, moderate or very high level of intensity, as defined by the ventilatory threshold. In their study, there was no significant difference in the reaction time (RT) across exercise intensities leading the authors to conclude that cognitive control was robust and did not appear to be influenced by the intensity of exercise. There is also debate as to the duration of exercise needed to elicit any change in cognitive performance with studies reporting changes after as little

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