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Purchasing Power Parity and Productivity-Bias Hypothesis

References 1. Asea, P.K., and E. Mendoza, (1994). The Balassa-Samuelson model: a general equilibrium appraisal. Review of International Economics, 2, 244-267. 2. Athukorala, P., (2005). Trade Policy Reforms and the Structure of Protection in Vietnam. Division of Economics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University. Download Material. Corresponding author: Premachandra. athukoral@anu.edu.au 3. Baharumshah, A.Z., and M. Ariff, (1997). Purchasing power parity in South East Asian

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Testing the Purchasing Power Parity Hypothesis: Case of ASEAN Economies

References Arize, A. C., Malindretos, J., & Ghosh, D. (2015). Purchasing Power Parity-Symmetry and Proportionality: Evidence from 116 Countries. International Review of Economics and Finance , 37 (C), 69–85. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iref.2014.11.014 Bec, F., & Zeng, S. (2013). Are Southeast Asian Real Exchange Rates Mean Reverting? Journal of International Financial Markets Institutions & Money , 23(February), 265–282. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intfin.2012.09.010 Boršič, D., & Bekő, J. (2018). Purchasing power parity in ASEAN+3: an

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Purchasing power parity in ASEAN+3: an application of panel unit root tests

References 1. Arize, A. C., Malindretos, J., Ghosh, D. (2015). Purchasing Power Parity-symmetry and Proportionality: Evidence from 116 Countries. International Review of Economics and Finance, Vol. 37, No. C, pp. 69-85. 2. Breitung, J. (2000). The Local Power of Some Unit Root Tests for Panel Data. In Advances in Econometrics, Vol. 15: Nonstationary Panels, Panel Cointegration, and Dynamic Panels, Baltagi B. (Ed.), JAI Press, Amsterdam, pp. 161-178. 3. Chang, T., Lee, C. H., Liu, W. C. (2012). Nonlinear

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Measurability of Social Development. Reflections on the Applicability of Social Progress Indices with Reference to Brexit

Abstract

The question is how the global and local economic actors’ innovation-based local social and environmental objectives and results can modify the social cohesion strategies, how the disparities in economic and social development can be measured and evaluated at regional level in addition to a comparison across countries. We have seen that any one indicator in itself is not enough since it does not provide sufficient explanation for either the development disparities or their reasons. Anyway, in addition to GDP per capita, it is worth applying - and it is important to apply - such indicators as SPI and Well-Being, and various indices of social progress.

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Corruption perceptions index and economic development of the country

Abstract

The phenomenon of corruption is known all over the world, and its intensity varies according to economic, behavioral and educational factors. Transparency International is a global civil society that carries out regular opinion surveys and publishes the perceptions of corruption in countries around the world. This index identifies the level of corruption perceived in the world and contributes achieving a ranking of countries in this regard. The corruption perception index should be correlated with economic situation of a country. The economic situation of a country can be reflected by GDP and unemployment rate. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the index of corruption is influenced by the economic situation of a country, so the study analyses the corruption perception index, GDP and unemployment rate, establishing whether there is a link between them.

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Comparative Price Levels of New EU Member Countries

References Balassa B. (1964), The Purchasing-Power Parity Doctrine: A Reappraisal, The Journal of Political Economy, No. 6, Dec. Blanchard J.O., Fischer, S. (2000), Lectures on Macroeconomics, The MIT Press, London Borgersen T. and King R.M. (2011), Reallocation and Restructuring: A Generalization of the Balassa-Samuel-son Efect. Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Vol. 22, No 4, pp. 287-298 Cassel G. (1918), Abnormal Deviations in International Exchanges, Economic Journal No. 28 Čihák M. and Holub T. (2005), Price Convergence in EU

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The Impact Of Foreign Direct Investment On Turkish Economy 2010–2016

Database. August 2017. 19. KALYONCU, H. “New evidence of the validity of purchasing power parity from Turkey”. Applied Economic Letters 16 (1), 2009: 63-67. 20. KARA, H. “Turkey’s Experience with Macroprudential Policy. Macroprudential Policy: Effectiveness and Implementation Challenges.” CBRT-IMF-BIS Joint Conference October 26-27, İstanbul. 35-43. Accessed on March 30, 2017, Available at: http://www.tcmb.gov.tr/wps/wcm/connect/444c28b5-eeea-4b88-b8e3291642f89cfa/RemarksO28_10_2015.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CACHEID=ROOTWORKSPACE444c28b5-eeea-4b88-b

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EU cohesion policy as a requirement to voivodeship development pathways

Abstract

Poland joined the European Union on 1 May 2004. By 2007, this had resulted in Poland being the greatest beneficiary of the European cohesion policy due to its low per capita GDP by purchasing power parity at the voivodeship level. The scale of European Structural and Investment Funds brought the possibility for a fundamental acceleration of socio-economic growth in Polish regions. The European Union gradually modified the directions of intervention under the framework of the European cohesion policy, initially orienting this activity principally towards cohesion, but from 2010 directing it mainly towards competitiveness. Of particular significance was the Europe 2020 strategy (2010). In Poland its arrangements were deferred until the signing of the Partnership Agreement for the period 2014-2020, which established extensive support for innovation, competitiveness and the R&D sector. In the final part of the paper, conclusions and recommendations for regional policy are elaborated.

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How is environmental performance associated with economic growth? A world cross-country analysis

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to explore the association between environmental performance and income level in the world economy in 2016. Data from Yale University and World Bank are used in a cross-country regression analysis comprising 166 countries. The gross Domestic Product per capita (based in purchased power parity, constant 2011 international dollars) in these countries is positively associated with the environmental performance index (EPI) calculated by Yale and Columbia University in 2016. Furthermore, the causality of this relationship is from GDP per capita to Environmental Performance and both Environmental Health (EH) and Ecosystem Vitality (EV) are positively associated with GDP per capita. Environmental Health (EH) is stronger related to GDP per capita, meaning that investments in public health, sanitation and infrastructure are increasing as countries develop.

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The Analysis of the Digital Economy and Society Index in the EU

Abstract

The paper analyzes the Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI), which characterizes the development of digital economy. Based on the data of 28 European countries for 2013–2018, using the panel regression, we studied the influence of the consumption index growth by the purchasing power parity and unemployment among the active population on the structural units of DESI. It is shown that a 1% increase in the consumption index results in about 0.2 increase in the DESI, and an increase in unemployment by 1% leads to about 0.2 DESI decline. It is also shown that the 98% value of DESI is actually determined by its previous trends, and therefore it is impossible to increase this index rapidly. Some reflections and conclusions are made on the perspective of the developing states, i.e., Ukraine, that is not yet assessed in DESI ranking.

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