Search Results

1 - 10 of 305 items :

Clear All

-108). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Haumann, D. (2010). Adnominal adjectives in Old English. English Language and Linguistics, 14(01), 53. Hill, J. (2009) Aelfric: his life and works. In H. Magennis & M. Swan (Eds.), A companion to Ælfric (pp. 35-66). Leiden, NL: Brill. Kohonen, V. (1978). On the development of English word order in religious prose around 1000 and 1200 A.D.: A quantitive study of world order in context. Åbo: Research Institute of the Åbo Akademi Foundation. Lehmann, W. (1974). Proto-Indo-European syntax. Austin: University of Texas Press. Mitchell

of at, in and on in some Old and Middle English texts. Odense: Odense University Press. MacCracken, H. N. (ed.). 1934. The minor poems of John Lydgate. Vol. 2. (Early English Text Society 192). London: Oxford University Press. McSparran, Frances (ed.). 1999. The Middle English compendium: The Middle English dictionary. A hyperbibliography of Middle English prose and verse, a Corpus of Middle English Prose and Verse. Ann Arbor: Humanities Text Initiative & University of Michigan. MED online = Middle English Dictionary. http://ets.umdl.umich.edu/m/med/ Middle English

Abstract

Translating haiku requires some sense of context. This article examines three elements of that context: seasonal words, the society in which haiku are produced, and prose (such as journal or short story). Behind the haiku there is a particular community in which poet and reader are close to each other, allowing the haiku to communicate more than their literal meaning. Taking this into consideration facilitates their translation.

References Abler, Alice. “The Moral of the Story.” Vision. Spring 2008. Web. 11 January 2016. Ashliman, D. L. Folk and Fairy Tales: A Handbook. Westport, New York and London: Greenwood, 2004. Print. Bacchilega, Cristina. Postmodern Fairytales: Gender and Narrative Strategies. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999. Print. Brandstatter, Tasha. “Reading Pathways: Tanith Lee.” 2015. Web. 23 January 2016. Chappell, Bill. “Prolifi c Fantasy And Science-Fiction Writer Tanith Lee Has Died.” 2015. Web. 23 January 2016. Delville, Michel. The American Prose

Abstract

This paper discusses the possibilities of a corpus analysis applied to literary study and interpretation. It is thus its goal to present some findings related to the disambiguation of some pronominal references, i.e. you and one, as they occur in speech and thought presentation in prose fiction, across periods in the 20th century. The texts selected are two of Virginia Woolf's novels (early and late modernist period) and one by Hugo Hamilton (in the postmodern era). The analysis benefits from a multi-layered interpretive framework drawing on discourse analysis, corpus-based approaches and literary study, particularly in that it unpacks ways in which writers make use of linguistic structures. These involve readers in a dialogic interpretation of the text's “polyphony” and “heteroglossia”, either conveying the generic pronoun reference or the protagonist's inner voice.

Abstract

The article presents Doina Ioanid and her prose poems. In her poems, Ioanid records in detailed manner everyday life episodes in order to capture the fragile, authentic, genuine aspects and thus the poetry of simple life. The author use the apparent trivial aspects of life for selfreflections and for her escapes into fantasy. Her poems is the result of a cautious language precision and frugality, which make of DoinaIoanid one of the most representative and gifted Romanian poets of the young generation.

Abstract

Ciaran Carson’s poetry is deeply concerned with the city of Belfast, as many of the poems unfold their twisting itinerary against the active background of this northern urban location. In addition to the poems Carson has published a fair number of prose pieces and a tentative autobiography, which also resurrects the city in its dynamism, though on a different timescale. The poems and the prose pieces together constitute a narrative of the changing city with the conclusion that the most apparent element of permanence in the context of the city is change itself, which leads to a strained relationship between the city and the map representing it.

Abstract

This paper presents an attempt to critically investigate the literary work of Japanese artist Kusama Yayoi (b. 1929). It takes as its object two of Kusama’s early prose texts and, by reading them through a feminist account of identity as fetishism, shows that the two novels presented in this paper-Kurisutofā danshō kutsu (1984) and Rijin kāten no shūjin (1984)-can be understood as a critical engagement with a potentially non-normative feminine self and, in a broader sense, as a negotiation of the state of being a woman in a patriarchal/androcentric society. These features can be traced back to her 1960s sculptural work and her Infinity Net Paintings. By not only situating Kusama’s literary work in a socio-historical context but also demonstrating that it constitutes an intertextual continuum with the rest of her artistic oeuvre, this paper offers an understanding of Kusama’s work besides the dominant narrative of her mental illness and lays the ground for further investigations into her literary texts.

Abstract

Although by far the most popular use of fifteenth century Fight Books in recent years has been their application to the study of Historical European Martial Arts and interpretations of medieval combat, this manner of learning from them was rarely what their creators had in mind. The following paper, relying primarily on the materials produced by Fiore dei Liberi, Filippo Vadi, Hans Talhoffer, and the anonymous author of Le Jeu de la Hache, will address modern practice and its connection to the source material via a study of the diplomatics of fifteenth century Fight Books, that is to say common tropes that are definitive of the genre. This has been done through analysing the roles of three of these; the purposes of introductions, of the use of language relating to the employment of either a prose or poetic structure, and the importance of the relationships between texts and illustrations. Through this application of diplomatics to Fight Books, the paper shall demonstrate how modern claims regarding authenticity are often overstated and in need of moderation.

Abstract

The primary focus of this paper is to examine the way the emotional categories of “happiness” and “sadness” are expressed vocally in the reading aloud of prose. In particular, the two semantic categories were analysed in terms of the pitch level and the pitch variability on a corpus based on 28 works written by Charles Dickens. passages with the intended emotional colouring were selected and the fragments found in the corresponding audiobooks. They were then analysed acoustically in terms of the mean F0 and the standard deviation of F0. The results for individual emotional passages were compared with a particular reader’s mean pitch and standard deviation of pitch. The differences obtained in this way supported the initial assumptions that the pitch level and its standard deviation would raise in “happy” extracts but lower in “sad” ones. Nevertheless, not all of these tendencies could be statistically validated and additional examples taken from a selection of random novels by other nineteenth century writers were added. The statistical analysis of the larger samples confirmed the assumed tendencies but also indicated that the two semantic domains may utilise the acoustic parameters under discussion to varying degrees. While “happiness” tends to be signalled primarily by raising F0, “sadness” is communicated mostly by lowering the variability of F0. Changes in the variability of F0 seem to be of less importance in the former case, and shifts in the F0 level less significant in the latter.