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, May 13-16, 2008, IAM, METU, Ankara. Bruns, B., Mingat, A. & Ramahatra, R. (2003). Achieving universal primary education by 2015, a chance for every child. The World Bank, Washington Dc., USA. Benson, H. (1995). Household Demand for Primary Schooling in Ethiopia: Preliminary Findings. Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, April 18-22, 1995, San Francisco, CA. Gordon, T. J. and Hayward, H. (1968) Initial experiments with the cross-impact matrix method of forecasting. Futures , 1, 100-116. Hanushek, E. A., Lavy, V. & Kohtaro, H. (2008). Do

. Computers & Education, 47 (1), 41-55. Nurmi, S., & Lehti, S. (2003). European teachers' expectations and opinions about learning objects. Paper presented in the Symposium "Designing Virtual Learning Materials" at the EARLI 2003 Conference. August 29, 2003; Padova, Italy. Phillips, R. (1997). The developer's handbook to interactive multimedia. A practical guide for educational applications. London: Kogan Page Rana, P. K. (2002). Evaluation of Web-Based Learning Systems used in the primary education sector. Unpublished Master's thesis, Brunel University, London, United

Abstract

Intercultural education advances the comprehension of different people and cultures. It emphasizes teaching that accepts and respects that diversity is normal in all areas of life. It attempts to sensitize the pupil to the concept that we all have developed in varied ways and that different does not mean “wrong”. In the presented article, we deal with a term defined in the context of intercultural education. We think about the way of its implementation in primary education, while respecting all the attributes of cultural differentiation. Intercultural education examines forms of xenophobia, trying to diminish them, and advocates equal opportunities for all. Intercultural education works to modify individuals and institutions and so transform the society (What is intercultural education? Do we in the West have the materials to accomplish this in our classrooms?).

Abstract

On a theoretical level with the support of literature, we offer some definitions of the concept of redundancy, point to the similarities and differences in the perception of this phenomenon in technical, social and pedagogical communication. We point out the positive and negative aspects of redundancy in the teacher's language. The research part is aimed at mapping the presence of redundancy in the language of primary education teachers. We were interested in which grade in the subject of mathematics is redundancy the most represented and whether it may be considered positive or unnecessary. The research was conducted at five primary schools on a sample of twenty teachers. The method of the research was the direct observation of lessons. The accuracy of the observation was ensured by audio recording and its analysis. We have found that redundancy is most often present in the third grade.

Abstract

This study presents a 13-year (2006–2018) systematic literature review related to the way that computational thinking (CT) has grown in elementary level education students (K-6) with the intention to: (a) present an overview of the educational context/setting where CT has been implemented, (b) identify the learning context that CT is used in education, (c) highlight the ways of assessment/measurement of CT and present the learning outcomes for students who engage in CT educational activities. A set of criteria were specified to select appropriate studies for inclusion in the review. A thorough search in ten large electronic databases, meeting the inclusion criteria, revealed 53 studies on CT in primary education. The results of the study revealed a variety of educational and learning contexts that CT has been integrated. The majority of studies use the framework of programming for both plugged and unplugged activities in order to cultivate students’ CT-skills, while the main interest focuses on the subject of Computer Science and STEM field in general. However, teaching and learning issues on CT-concepts and skills, CT-measurement and the adoption of an established definition of CT remain a challenge. Based on the current findings, some recommendations and implications for future research are provided.

Abstract

The paper deals with the possibility of interactive whiteboard (IWB) implementation to the technical education support in the frames of pre-primary education. It also presents some types of IWB, deals with problems associated with this issue and introduces teachers’ competencies needed for the work with them. The final part points out the results of the research realized in this field in the USA and in Slovakia.

Abstract

Continuous improvement of the teaching process requires teachers to constantly think, analyse and evaluate their own work and try to improve its quality. The paper deals with the introduction of quality management in the teaching process, since one way of improving the quality of education is to build a quality management system at primary schools, focusing exclusively on schools with Hungarian language of instruction. The paper includes the climate survey of the school class aiming at verifying the current state of the social climate of the class in the subject of Slovak language and Slovak literature. When teaching this subject at the primary level of education, attention has to be paid to the fact that pupils in the first year of primary school with Hungarian language of instruction come with different linguistic and speech competences.

, 2018 http://www.clil4children.eu/documents-and-media/guideaddressed-to-teachers-on-how-to-use-clil-methodology-in-primary-schools/ . Accessed 1 Jan. 2019. Gómez, Domingo Ruiz. “A Practical Approach to CLIL in L2 Content-Based Courses: Methodological Guidelines for the Andalusian Bilingual Classroom.” CLIL in Action , edited by David Marsh et al., Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, pp. 14-30. Massler, Ute. “Assessment in CLIL Learning.” Guidelines for CLIL Implementation in Primary and Pre- -Primary Education , edited by Sophie Ioannou-Georgiou and Pavlos Pavlou

Abstract

Educational provisions, such as Early Bilingual Education (EBE) and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), where curriculum content is learnt, taught and assessed through the means of an additional language, are not yet widespread in general primary and secondary education in Portugal. Knowing how to assess in such provisions, which have a dual focus on the mastering of language proficiency and content knowledge and skills, can be intricate. The first step towards building a rationale for soundly assessing language and content at early primary level in Portuguese schools needs to first understand how teachers working in EBE and CLIL education settings view assessment and what they do with it in the classroom. This article analyses the research findings of a small scale national research study conducted in Portugal in 2013/2014 on EBE and CLIL assessment beliefs, knowledge and practice on the part of teachers working in a national pilot on early bilingual education – the Bilingual Schools Project teachers (BSPT) and teachers working in similar provisions in private schools – the Non-Bilingual Schools Project teachers (NBSPT).

Abstract

The aim of the research paper was to analyse the distribution of education support financed by the European Union. We focused on the evaluation of the regional distribution of the primary education support within the less developed NUTS 2 regions in Slovakia which were eligible to receive a support through two selected political measures. Particularly, we analysed the Regional Operational Programme, particularly the Measure 1.1 Education Infrastructure that was aimed at modernizing the primary school buildings and equipment. On the other hand we examined also the Operational Programme Education, particularly its measure 1.1 Transformation of traditional to modern school that was focused on the modernization of content of education process. The analysis pointed out the main differences between the mentioned two support measures. It was also showed the territorial distribution of these EU funds at the NUTS 2 level, regional level and at the levels of particular districts and supported municipalities. These results were confronted with a selected indicator of development, through which the fulfilment of the principle of territorial concentration was examined.