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Can Inflammatory Markers Diagnosed Upon Ultrasound Examination During Pregnancy Regress After Administration of Vaginal Treatment? – A Pilot Study

Abstract

Background: Inflammatory markers in prenatal ultrasound are a heterogeneous group of images that can evolve during pregnancy, due to regression or exacerbation of infection in pregnant women.

Objective:The assessment if effective rebalancing of the bacterial flora of the vagina can lead to withdrawal of the symptoms of inflammation in ultrasound examination (US).

Methods: A retrospective pilot study, among pregnant woman admitted to the Department of Prenatal Cardiology ICZMP in 2013-2014 in whom ultrasonographic signs of intrauterine infection were present. Electronic database were searched for key words ”infection, placentitis, tricuspid regurgitation, poly/oligohydramnion, IUGR, CRP, antibiotics, vaginal treatment”. The analysis included 238 patients, 30 received antibacterial vaginal treatment, from 27 patients a complete follow-up (control ultrasound after 10-14 days and data on labor) were obtained.

Results: The average age of patients was 29 years. In 22% of patients tricuspid regurgitation was observed and it was the most commonly recognized marker of infection. Regression of infection signs were observed in 21 patients (77.8%) after 2 weeks of vaginal treatment.

2 patients presented with ultrasound image stabilization, in 3 patients worsening of tricuspid regurgitation or cardiac hypertrophy were detected. Polyhydramnios, the second most common parameter (18.51% of patients) resolved after treatment in all studied patients. The delivery took place an average at 39th week of gestation (SD +/- 1.93).

Conclusions: Effective anti-inflammatory vaginal treatment improved ultrasound images in 21 out of 27 fetuses. These preliminary observations suggesting a beneficial role of the vaginal treatment on inflammatory markers in pregnancy ultrasound require further investigation.

Open access