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Imaginary Sudan – Reflections on the Formation of the Notion of Sudan in the Period of European Influences

ABSTRACT

The author explores how the images from the colonial past affected what we understand today under the notion of Sudan. He concentrates on the category of the Nile, Sudanese-Egyptian analogies, the history making processes and colonial rule. Moreover points out that the the British used and reproduced a Muslim concept of cultural geography of Africa, and in particular, the notion of Bilad as-Sudan (”Land of the Blacks”), constituting the essence of division into white and black Africa. In this tradition Sudan placed itself at the meeting point between those two worlds and was presented as the civilisation borderland of the Muslim culture. This image was taken over by the Europeans and the British in particular. For them Sudan was an arena of conflict of civilisation with barbarity, good with evil, Europe with primitive culture.

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An Enormous Interstitial Mestizo? The (Im)possibility of Eurasian Identity in Dutch Postcolonial Novels

Abstract

This article examines the (im)possibility of Eurasian identity in Dutch postcolonial novels by second-generation authors such as Marion Bloem and Adriaan van Dis. As a result of Indonesia’s decolonisation 300.000 Dutch nationals came from the former Dutch East Indies to the Netherlands. Among them was a large group of Eurasians, people of mixed Dutch and Indonesian descent. Many of whom had never set foot on the so-called motherland. Although Eurasians had belonged to the European community in the tropics, they were perceived as immigrants by the Dutch government and were subjected to an aggressive, far-reaching assimilation policy - fearing they would otherwise become a major social problem. Their offspring, the so-called second generation, is often assumed to struggle with their identity while growing up in a postcolonial society that did not tolerate cultural differences at the time. What constitutes a Eurasian identity, and can such identities exist after the enforced assimilation of Eurasians in the Netherlands? How do second-generation authors look upon their Eurasian background and how do they portray these assumed identity struggles in postcolonial literature? The texts in question are discussed in relation to theories of hybridity. It is argued that the widespread notion that Eurasians either fall between two stools or grow into examples of hybrid identity are not foregone conclusions.

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The Historical Taboo: Colonial Discourses and Postcolonial Identities in Belgium

Abstract

This article examines so-called colonial discourses in Belgium related to the former Sub-Saharan colony owned by Leopold II of Belgium which today is known as the Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo) or the Congo-Kinshasa. Having introduced the colonial history of the DR Congo from the 15th century until 1910, the study starts with a discussion of Van den Braembussche’s concept of a ‘historical taboo’ and four ways of engaging with such implicit interdictions. Finally, an empirical analysis of colonial discourses in Belgium from the 1890s until today will be presented in conjunction with Belgium’s linguistic-cultural division, taking into account age-related divergence.

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Plädoyer für eine kulturwissenschaftliche Ästhetik aus Perspektive der cultural studies

Abstract

Our comment on Hartmut Böhme advocates an approach to aesthetics that is mainly inspired by British cultural studies. In the wake of the foundation of the „Kulturwissenschaftliche Gesellschaft” and its journal we suggest, on the one hand, a relentless reflection on essentialist and colonialist power structures inherent in the concept of culture, particularly in the German speaking world. On the other hand, we plea for the provincialization of European aesthetics as well as for the acknowledgement of the manifold entanglements between European and non-European accounts of aesthetics.

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Modernity, (Post)Modernism and New Horizons of Postcolonial Studies. The Role and Direction of Caribbean Writing and Criticism in the Twenty-First Century

Abstract

My article will take issue with some of the scholarship on current and prospective configurations of the Caribbean and, in more general terms, postcolonial literary criticism. It will give an account of the turn-of-the century debates about literary value and critical practice and analyze how contemporary fiction by Caribbean female writers responds to the socioeconomic reality that came into being with the rise of globalization and neo-liberalism. I will use David Scott’s thought provoking study-Refashioning Futures: Criticism after Postcoloniality (1999)-to outline the history of the Caribbean literary discourse and to try to rethink the strategic goals of postcolonial criticism.

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Poland and Its Eastern Neighbours: A Postcolonial Case Study

Abstract

The article presents problematic issues resulting from the Polish presence on the historical eastern border of the II Rzeczpospolita (Republic of Poland), or, as it is called in the Polish national discourse, “Kresy”. The notion of Kresy, to a certain extent, corresponds to the notion of ‘borderland’. However, the latter is neutral and used mostly in scientific discourse, whereas the former alludes to Polish national awareness in literature and much of the historical writings and presents itself as the lost centre of “Polishness”. This way, contemporary Polish historical memory makes substantial claims towards this space, both in a geographical and historical sense, while hardly tolerating the presence of indigenous, non-Polish populations inhabiting the area- Lithuanians, Belarusians, and Ukrainians. In order to revise these issues in the article, I have adopted a postcolonial studies perspective. Looking at Poland through the lens of postcolonial studies reveals that it holds a unique position due to its double status. Historically speaking, Poland occupied both the position of the colonizer and of the colonized. However, popular Polish imagination tends to see Poland only in its role of the oppressed victims of its powerful ibjesial neighbours. The dominant role of Poland and its version of colonial policy adopted towards its contemporary eastern neighbours is obscured or simply denied both in popular and scientific discourse. The analysis of the role of the “myth of Kresy”, proposed here, hopes to contribute to the understanding of the implications of the Polish contemporary “orientalism”.

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”Hvid Udenpå. Indeni er Jeg Helt... Grå”.1
HYBRIDE IDENTITETER i JAKOB EJERSBOS ”AFRIKA-TRILOGI”

ABSTRACT

The aim of the article is to discuss the problem of hybrid identity, as it is presented in Jakob Ejersbo’s “Africa-trilogy” (2009). As the methodological framework for the analysis serve some of the main notions borrowed from postcolonial studies (as hybridity and contact zone), as well as Zygmunt Bauman’s diagnoses on “the liquid modernity” (among others his understanding of identity and his tourist and vagabond metaphors). The latter ones indicate the universal dimension of Ejersbo’s prose, which until now has been read mainly from the postcolonial critique’s position and as a polemical comment on the Scandinavian self-understanding as a region, which has never been included in the colonial project and which sets an example on providing humanitarian aid.

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Other Spaces of the Empire: A Colonial Hotel in J.G. Farrell’s Troubles

Abstract

Focusing on the hotel imagery and, more precisely, the hotel Majestic featured in J.G. Farrell’s 1970 novel Troubles, this article provides a spatial contextualization of the historical downfall of the British Empire. In an attempt to establish the concept of the “colonial hotel”, this particular type of hotel is theorized as a fictional means of questioning the sustainability of the imperial project of colonialism. The theoretical framework for considerations of the Majestic in Troubles as a representative of the “colonial hotel” concept is based on Foucault’s heterotopology, as well as on the concepts of liminality and dislocation taken from postcolonial studies. Reading Troubles as an allegory of the Troubles in Ireland and, more broadly, a symptom of the disintegration of the British Empire, the article shows that the hotel, modelled after the historical concept of the Anglo-Irish big house, provides a proper setting where the deconstruction of the binary oppositions of colonial discourse can be played out. While the Majestic represents a mirror-image of the imperial centre, or rather a dislocated centre, its destruction is brought about by its tendency towards constancy and perpetuation of the illusion of grandeur. Similarly, the British Empire refuses to acknowledge the socio-political and historical changes of the early twentieth century and denies the existence of interstitial spaces between its firmly defined structures, whereby it inevitably meets its end.

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“Would they not wish the feast might ever last?”: Strong Spice, Oral History and the Genesis of Globe to Globe

References Bennett, Susan and Christie Carson, Eds. Shakespeare Beyond English: A Global Experiment. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Devji, Faisal Fatehali. “Subject to Translation: Shakespeare, Swahili, Socialism.” Postcolonial Studies 3 (2000): 181-89. Gossett, Suzanne. “Habima Merchant of Venice: Performances Inside and Outside the Globe.” Shakespeare Beyond English. Ed. S. Bennett and C. Carson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. 269-272. Haddad, Tamara. “We Want

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Communication across cultures: ideological implications of Sam Selvon’s linguistic inventiveness

-84. Brathwaite, E.K. 1984. “Nation Language.” In: Bill Ashcroft et al. (eds.). 2003. The Postcolonial Studies Reader. London/New York: Routledge, pp. 309-313. Clarke, A. 1994. A Passage Back Home: A Personal Reminescence of Samuel Selvon. Toronto: Exile Editions. Fabre, M. 1988. “Samuel Selvon: Interviews and Conversations.“ In: Nasta, S. (ed.) 1988. Critical Perspectives on Sam Selvon. Washington: Three Continents Press, pp. 64-76. Kabesh, L.M. 2011. “Mapping Freedom, or Its Limits: The Politics of Movement in Sam Selvon’s The

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