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Yield Potentiality of Maize as Relay Crop with T. Aman Rice under Different Agronomic Management

REFERENCES Ahmed, F., Islam, M.N., Rahman, M.T., Jahan, M.A. & Khan, M.S.A. (2010). Leaf area index, radiation interception, dry matter production and grain yield of hybrid maize as influenced by plant spacing. Bangladesh Agron.J. , 13(1&2):51-58 Ali, M.Y. (2006). Rice-maize systems in Bangladesh. Invited oral presentation in the workshop on Assessing the Potential of Rice-Maize Systems in Asia . IRRICIMMYT Alliance Program for Intensive Production Systems in Asia, held 4-8 December, 2006, IRRI, Los Baños, Philippines. Andrade, H.F., Otegui

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Growth and yield behaviour of two maize hybrids (Zea mays l.) towards different plant spacing

., 43(8): 5571; 1990) Porter P.,D. Hicks, W. Lueschen, J. Ford, D. Warnes, T. Hoverstad, 1997 - Corn response to row width and plant population in the northern Corn Belt. J. Prod. Agric., 10 (2): 293-300 Rezuvaev A.I., 1981 - Effect of fertilizers on maize productivity in relation to stand density in the voromezh region. Khimiya Selskom Khozyaistve. 19(7): 7-10. Abstracted in Field Crop Abst., 35: 9648. 1982 Rogers I.S., G.J. Lomman, 1988 - Effects of plant spacing on yield, size and kernel fill of sweet corn. Aust

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Impact of Varying Planting Patterns and Fertilizer Application Strategies on Autumn Planted Sunflower Hybrid

Abstract

Achene yield, oil contents and protein contents are vital yield attributes of sunflower crop. To acquaint the impact of NP rates and planting patterns on the production potential of autumn sunflower hybrid Hysun-33 and fertilizer use efficiency a field experiment was executed in 2005. Treatments comprised of four NP combinations viz. 0-0, 50-35, 100-70 and 150-105 NP kg ha-1 and two planting patterns viz. bed sowing with 75 cm wide beds separated by 20 cm furrows and bed sowing with 60 cm wide beds separated by 25 cm furrows. Treatment 150-105 NP kg ha-1 with 75 cm wide beds separated by 20 cm furrows was found to be supercilious as it exhibited significant lofty achene yield (3360.00 kg ha-1), number of achene head-1 (1267.02), 1000-achene weight (68.65 g), biological yield (11166.6 kg ha-1) and harvest index (30.09%). Contrastingly, treatment 0-0 N-P kg ha-1 with 60 cm wide bed separated by 25 cm plant spacing bestowed the minimum grain yield. Frail increase in oil contents with gradual increase in fertilizer levels but it did not procure at a level of significance. Superior protein contents (27.71%) were revealed in treatment 150-105 N-P kg ha-1 with 75 cm wide bed separated by 20 cm plant spacing.

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Effects of selected agronomical factors on the content of health-promoting compounds in spaghetti squash (Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo)

Effects of selected agronomical factors on the content of health-promoting compounds in spaghetti squash (Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo)

The study examined the effects of the sowing date (5, 15 and 25 May) and plant spacing (1 × 0.6 m, 1 × 0.8 m and 1 × 1 m) on the content of carotenoids and L-ascorbic acid in the fruits of two cultivars of spaghetti squash (‘Makaronowa Warszawska' and ‘Pyza’). The field experiment was carried out in central-eastern Poland. Fully mature spaghetti squash fruits were harvested from the beginning of September to the beginning of October. The content of total carotenoids and β-carotene was the greatest in the fruits of plants sown on 15 May. The sowing date did not affect the content of L-ascorbic acid. Increasing the plant spacing from 1 × 0.6 m to 1 × 1 m resulted in an increase of total carotenoid content, particularly for the spaghetti squash sown on 25 May. Plant spacing did not have a significant effect on the content of β-carotene and L-ascorbic acid. Fruits of the ‘Makaronowa Warszawska’ with light orange flesh contained more total carotenoids and β-carotene than fruits of the ‘Pyza’ with cream-coloured flesh. The content of L-ascorbic acid in the fruits of both cultivars did not differ significantly.

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Variance components and parent–offspring cor- relations of growth traits vary among the initial planting spacings in Zelkova serrata

Abstract

Variance components of tree height (HT) and stem diameter at 1.3 m above the ground (DBH) were investigated for the eight open-pollinated families of Zelkova serrata (Thumb.) Makino planted with three different initial planting spacings in a progeny test site, Chiba, Japan. Parent–offspring correlations were also evaluated by using these families and their mother trees. The smallest values of HT and DBH were observed in the narrowest initial planting spacing (1.10 x 1.10 m) compared to those in medium (1.30 x 1.36 m) and wide (2.00 x 1.80 m) spacings, suggesting that adverse effects of competition with neighboring trees occurred on both height and radial growth. Similar to HT and DBH, the initial planting spacings also affected the genetic parameter estimates: the ratio of family variance component to total phenotypic variance showed the highest value in narrow initial planting spacing for both HT and DBH. Thus, family variance component might include competition effects, leading to biased genetic parameter estimates. In contrast, parent–offspring correlation coefficients showed the highest value in wide initial planting spacing where competition effect might be smaller. Therefore, the growth traits of Z. serrata might be inherited from the parent to the offspring when competition effect was small.

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The effects of different methods of cultivation and plant spacing on the chemical composition of broccoli heads

depending on the method of preliminary processing of the raw material and preparation of frozen products for consumption. Eur. Food Res. Technol. 224: 573-579. KUNICKI E., 2004. Uprawa brokułów. Hortpress, Warszawa. KUNICKI E., 2005. Wpływ nawadniania, nawożenia azotowego i pory zbioru na jakość plonu brokułu w uprawie jesiennej. Zesz. Nauk. AR w Krakowie 421, Rozpr. 305. KUNICKI E., CAPECKA E., SIWEK P., KALISZ A., 1999. The effect of plant spacing on the yield and quality of three broccoli cultivars in autumn growing

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Response of Linola (Linum usitatissimum L.) to Different Spacings under Rainfed Conditions

-92. Leitch M.H., Sahi F., 1999 - The effect of plant spacing on growth and development in linseed. Ann. Appl. Biol., 135(2): 529-534. Pandey D.D., Chanchal S., Singh N.K., 2002 - Biomass and net primary productivity of Linum usitatissimum L. J. Environ. and Ecol., 20: 555-557. Paulsen H.M., Schochow M. Ulber, B. Kühne, S. Rahmann, G. 2006 - Mixed cropping systems for biological control of weeds and pests in organic oilseed crops. Asp. Appl. Biol., 79: 215-220. Rennebaum H., Grimm E., Warnstorff K., Diepenbrock W., 2002

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Realized Gains from Block-Plot Coastal Douglas-Fir Trials in the Northern Oregon Cascades

Abstract

Realized gains for coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) were evaluated using data collected from 15-year-old trees from five field trials planted in large block plots in the northern Oregon Cascades. Three populations with different genetic levels (elite - high predicted gain; intermediate - moderate predicted gain; and unimproved - wild seedlot) were compared at two planting spacings (1.8 × 1.8 m and 3.6 × 3.6 m). The realized gains at age 15 averaged over both the elite and intermediate progeny were 17.2% for stand volume per hectare, 3.5% for mean height, and 4.3% for diameter, compared to predicted genetic gains of 16.0% for volume, 5.4% for height, and 6.4% for diameter. Realized and predicted gains correlated well at the family level, with an average correlation coefficient close to 0.80. The improved populations also had higher survival rate and lower stem sinuosity than the unimproved population. Strong genetic level × planting spacing interaction effects were revealed for the growth traits at age 15 using mixed model analyses. Realized gains for stand per-hectare volume and mean growth rate were at least twice as large in the elite population as in the intermediate population at the close spacing. By contrast, both populations performed similarly at the wide spacing. This indicates that the selected genetic materials responded differently to the changes of competitive environment, and realized gain trials should closely mimic operational plantations in order to provide valid estimates of realized gains. Realized gains in per-hectare volume varied greatly among test sites. No significant genetic level x site interactions were found for any traits.

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Effect of Different Sowing Techniques and Mulches on the Growth and Yield Behavior of Spring Planted Maize (Zea Mays L.)

References Ali M., S.K. Khalil, S. Ayaz, M.I. Marwat, 1998 - Phenological stages, flag leaf area, plant height, and leaves per plant of corn influenced by phosphorus levels and plant spacing. Sarhad J. Agric. 14: 515-522. Amin M., A. Razzaq, R. Ullah, M. Ramzan, 2006 - Effect of planting methods, seed density and nitrogen, phosphorus fertilizer levels on sweet corn ( Zea mays L.) J. Res. Sci. 17(2): 83-89. Brown P., 1985 - Maize ( Zea mays L.) cultivation trials 1982-83. Nyasald.Fmr. For. 4, pp:13

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Stand density management and blue carbon stock of monospecific mangrove plantation in Bohol, Philippines

Abstract

Blue carbon pertains to carbon stock that is stored by marine ecosystems including mangrove forest. Density and blue carbon stock assessment was conducted covering mature Rhizophora stylosa Griff. plantations in Bohol, Philippines. Three stand types were assessed: thinned mature stand (0.34 tree m−2 at 55 years old; 35 ha); non-thinned mature stand (1.2 tree m−2 at 55 years old; 20 ha) and young stand (2.6 tree m−2 at 20 years old; 150 ha). These plantations were initially established with a plant spacing of 0.5 m × 0.5 m. Non-destructive plot sampling technique was used to account biomass and carbon stocks of trees and sediments. Five (5) sample plots measuring 200 m2 were allocated for each stand type. Results showed that the total carbon stock of plantations amassed to 64.5 ktC or 236.6 ktCO2e. More than half (at least 54%) of this stock is imbedded in sediment. Individual accounts showed that carbon stock was largest in non-thinned stand with 435.2 tC ha−1, followed by thinned stand (408.5 tC ha−1) and young stand (276.8 tC ha−1). There was no significant difference between thinned and non-thinned mature stands carbon stocks. Such finding suggested the potential of having thinning intervention. Following the self-thinning rule of 1.1 to 1.3 tree m−2, the local community can harvest as much as 423 trees ha−1 yr−1 for 35 years starting at the plantation age of 20 years. Further, the additional carbon stock between the ages 20 to 55 years could reach about 580 tCO2e ha−1 with an economic value of USD 2,962 ha−1. With this potential benefits, it is recommended that Banacon Island should pursue a carbon offset project for its plantations.

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