Search Results

1 - 10 of 12 items :

  • "plant community composition" x
Clear All
Topography of Spoil Heaps and Its Role in Plant Succession and Soil Fauna Presence

Abstract

The spoil heaps from brown coal mining without technical reclamation are interesting specific sites for ecological relationships observation. This research was aimed at investigating whether topographic features, which determine soil nutrient and moisture distribution, in combination with soil fauna (wireworm and earthworm) presence, affect plant community composition at a spontaneously revegetated post mining area with an undulating surface. Two sites of different age with three types of topographic features were selected, soil moisture and nutrient contents were measured, and plant community composition and soil macrofauna community were sampled at each position. Wireworms were present at all positions and were most abundant at the bottoms of waves at the younger site; their presence was correlated with the presence of several plant species with high palatability for wireworms, but the direction of the interaction is not clear. Earthworms were only present at the older site and had the highest abundance at flat sections. Earthworm presence affected the amount of nitrogen in soil - the highest nitrogen content was at the site with the highest earthworm density and was followed by a higher diversity of plant community. The plant community composition was generally correlated with plant available nutrient content - especially P and N. We infer that topographic features affect nutrient and soil fauna distribution, which consequently influences the plant community composition.

Open access
Transformation of methane in peatland environments

Abstract

Wetlands and particularly peatlands are the main natural source of methane. Data indicate that 10-45% of methane emission comes from these sources. Methane emission from wetlands is the result of the balance between methanogenesis and methanotrophic processes and is actively affected by the wetland plant community composition. There are many factors affecting the balance of CH4: for instance, vegetation has a strong effect on CH4 emissions from wetland ecosystems by influencing methane production, consumption and transport in the soil. The effects of plants on methane fluxes may be mediated by: molecular diffusion, internal transport through plant aerenchyma tissues and ebullition. Methane is formed in the process of methanogenesis under anaerobic conditions. It may then be emitted into the atmosphere directly from the soil or by internal transport through the plant. Alternatively, it may undergo methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria, both free-living in the root zone and associated with the host plant in symbiosis. Sphagnum moss is of particular importance for this processes as it contains methanotrophic bacteria in its endophytic system. Methanotrophic bacteria live inside the dead hyaline cells or on the surface of Sphagnum leaves and are able to oxidise methane produced in the soil during methanogenesis, making peatlands a natural biofilter for methane, one of the main greenhouse gases

Open access
Miocene carpological floras of the Konin region (Central Poland)

Abstract

Carbonaceous, three-dimensionally preserved macroscopic plant remains from the Lubstów, Gosławice and Pątnów brown coal open-pit mines are described and illustrated, providing a comprehensive elaboration of the middle Miocene carpological floras of the Konin region. The diaspores represent the following families: Pinaceae, Sciadopityaceae, Cupressaceae, Annonaceae, Cabombaceae, Nymphaeaceae, Araceae, Typhaceae, Cyperaceae, Vitaceae, Rosaceae, Rhamnaceae, Fagaceae, Myricaceae, Cornaceae, Nyssaceae, Symplocaceae, Ericaceae, Araliaceae, and Adoxaceae. Forty-two species were recognised or documented for the first time in the Konin region. Two genera, three species and three morphotypes are described as new taxa.

Most of these plant remains represent azonal vegetation. Ericaceous bogs, pine bogs and mixed coniferous bogs, accompanied by Gyptostrobus swamp forests and various aquatic plant communities, are suggested as the most widespread vegetation types. Remains representing mesophytic, zonal vegetation, resembling extant evergreen broad-leaved and mixed mesophytic forests, are sparse. A Sciadopitys raised bog, a mixed coniferous bog subtype, was one of the important biomass sources forming the brown coal of the I-Middle Polish seam group. Other bog types recognised in Lubstów presumably also played a part in this process. Wildfire is suggested as an important factor controlling the Miocene vegetation of the Konin region.

The floristic composition and lithostratigraphy indicate the Badenian age (16.3–12.8 Ma) for the studied floras, but radiometric data suggest that two Lubstów floras are older and one is younger than 13.6 Ma. Biostrati-graphically, Lubstów floras were correlated with the Klettwitz – Salzhausen floristic complex. Based on several climatic indicators and biostratigraphic correlation, the climate is estimated to have been humid, warm-temperate or subtropical.

The upper Miocene lower Rhenish Basin floras are the most comparable in floristic and plant communities’ composition. Tropical – subtropical, Mediterranean and extinct genera represent approximately 40% of the genera identified in Lubstów.

Open access
The Application of Geobiocoenological Landscape Typology in The Modelling of Climate Change Implications

References Ambros Z. (1985). Bioindikace abiotického prostředí lesních ekosystémů. Acta Universitatis Agriculturae Brno. 54(3-4), 367-392. Bertrand, R., Lenoir, J., Piedallu, C., Riofrio-Dillon, G., de Ruffray, P., Vidal, C., Pierrat, J. C., Gegout, J. C. (2011). Changes in plant community composition lag behind climate warming in lowland forests. Nature. 479, 517-520. Buček, A., Lacina, J. (1979). Biogeografická diferenciace krajiny jako jeden z ekologických podkladů pro územní plánování. Územní plánování a

Open access
Present state and changes that occur within plant communities growing on the floating mat that surrounds the Moszne lake (Polesie National Park)

traditional management and experimental liming. Ecol. Eng. 75: 208-216. VICHEROVA E., HAJEK M., HAJEK T. 2015. Calcium intolerance of fen mosses: Physiological evidence, effectcs of nutrient availability and successional drivers. Perspect. Plant Ecol. 17(5): 347-359. WELTZIN J.F., BRIDGHAM S.D., PASTOR J., CHEN J., HARTH C. 2003. Potential effects of warming and drying on peatland plant community composition. Global Change Biol. 9: 141-151. WENTZELL B.M., BOYLEN CH.W., NIERZWICKI-BAUER S.A. 2016. Wetland ecosystem comparison using a suite of plant

Open access
Weed Flora in Organic Common Mallow (Malva sylvestris L.)

intensification modulate changes in plant community composition? Agric., Ecosyst. Environ., 145(1): 77-84, 2011. JOSIFOVIĆ, M.: Flora SR Srbije, I-IX (M. Josifović, ed.). SANU, Beograd, Srbija, 1970-1977. LANDOLT, E.: Flora indicative – Ecological indicator values and biological attributes of the flora of Switzerland and the Alps (E. Landolt, ed.). Haupt Verlag, Bern, Swiss, 2010. LJEVNAIĆ-MAŠIĆ, B., NIKOLIĆ, LJ., DŽIGURSKI, D.: Weeds in organic production of pepper ( Capsicum annuum L.) – bioindicators of habitat conditions. Journal on Processing and Energy

Open access
Ants as Ecosystem Engineers in Natural Restoration of Human Made Habitats

of soil-dwelling ants, ant mounds and simulated grazing on local plant community composition. Basic and Applied Ecology, 12(8): pp. 703-712. Vlasáková, B., Raabová, J., Kyncl, T., Dostál, P., Kovářová, M., Kovář, P., Herben, T., (2009). Ants speed up succession from grassland towards forest. Journal of Vegetation Science, 20: pp. 577-587. Vojtíšek, P., (2012). Ants and primary vegetation succession on abandoned industrialwaste deposits . MSc Thesis (deposited in Library of the Institute of Environment, Faculty of Science

Open access
Grasslands of intermontane basins of Central Caucasus: land use legacies and present-day state

-455. Miller, V. F. 1887: Osetinskie etyudy. Uchenye zapiski imperatorskogo Moskovskogo universiteta. V. III. Moskva, 226 pp. Molchanov, E. N. 2008: Mountainous meadow chernozem-like soils of high mountains in the North Caucasus region. Eurasian Soil Science December 2008, 41(12), pp. 1268-1281. O’Connor, T. G. 2005: Influence of Land Use on Plant Community Composition and Diversity in Highland Sourveld Grassland in the Southern Drakensberg, South Africa. Journal of Applied Ecology 42 (5): 975-988. O’Connor, T. G., Greg

Open access
Linking surface and subsurface properties of biocrusted and non-biocrusted habitats of fine-grained fluvial sediments (playas) from the Negev Desert

Desert, Namibia. Sedimen. Geol., 55, 143–162. Weltzin, J.E., Bridgham, S.D., Pastor, J., Chen, J., Harth, C., 2003. Potential effect of warming and drying on peatland plant community composition. Global Change Biol., 9, 141–151. Wetzel, R.G., Westlake, D.F., 1969. Periphyton. In: Vollenweider, R.A. (Ed.): A Manual on Methods for Measuring Primary Production in Aquatic Environments. Blackwell Scientific, Oxford (UK), pp. 33–40. Wondzell, S.M., Cornelius, J.M., Cunningham, G.L, 1990. Vegetation patterns, microtopography, and soils on a Chihuahuan desert

Open access
Subalpine vegetation in Giresun Mountains (Turkey)

. McCune, B., Grace, J. B., 2002: Analysis of Ecological Communities. MjM Software Design, Glenden Beach, OR, USA. Michalet, R., Gandoy, C., Joud, D., Pages, J. P., Choler, P., 2002: Plant community composition and biomass on calcareous and siliceous substrates in the northern French Alps: comparative effects of soil chemistry and water status. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research 34, 102–113. Mucina, L., 1997: Conspectus of classes of European vegetation. Folia Geobotanica 32, 117–172. Mucina, L., Bültmann, H., Dierßen, K., Theurillat, J. P., Raus, T

Open access