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References Alfani, G. 2013. Plague in seventeenth-century Europe and the decline of Italy: an epidemiological hypothesis. European Review of Economic History 17 (4), 408–430. DOI: 10.1093/ereh/het013 Alfani, G., Percoco, M. 2019. Plague and long-term development: the lasting effects of the 1629–30 epidemic on the Italian cities. The Economic History Review 72 (4), 1175–1201. DOI: 10.1111/ehr.12652 Birks, H.J.B. and Birks, H. H. 1980. Quaternary palaeoecology, London, Cambridge University Press. Bogucka, M., Samsonowicz, H. 1986 Dzieje miast i mieszczaństwa w

Abstract

This paper interprets the “green” poetry of Andrew Marvell (1621-1678). It discusses the main features of the Renaissance pastoral, especially the standard elements of the genre and its ethical aspects. Methodologically, it combines ecocritical reading with the philosophical concepts of harmony, based on Pythagorean harmonic lore. It shows the paradoxes of Marvell’s treatment of the pastoral, especially the dramatic contrast between the meditative and comforting aspect of the pastoral genre and the impossibility of reconciling the harmonious ethos of the natural world with the plagues of human love and its finality.

Abstract

This paper is focused on the issue of corruption perception in the Czech Republic. After introducing the general framework for corruption perception in post-communist countries, this paper uses the Czech Republic as an example of the ways in which corruption is perceived, the areas Czech citizens feel are most plagued by corruption, and the ways in which corruption perception has transformed in terms of post-communist developments. This paper points out the differences in corruption perception among Czech citizens, the media and political parties and their representatives. The conclusion of the paper attempts to answer the question of how corruption perception has affected the overall perception of the democratic regime in the Czech Republic. It also asks questions regarding how this has influenced the evaluation of democracy and the relationship between Czech citizens and political institutions, including individual political parties.

Abstract

While Holocaust historiography and literary criticism have typically been male-centred, on the presumption that the experiences of women and men were essentially identical, the aim of this study is to investigate gendered perceptions and representations of the Holocaust and its aftermath in Cynthia Ozick’s two-part fictional narrative The Shawl. The narrative focuses on the gender-based suffering of women and the murder of their innocent children and includes a brief account of a mother’s witnessing of her daughter’s electrocution in a concentration camp. The second part of the narrative represents an extended exposition of that atrocity’s psychological toll on the mother’s postwar life and her sense of being suspended in a liminal space between life and death, plagued by the constant intrusion of the Holocaust into her life.

Abstract

The Chinese Professional Baseball League (CPBL) was the first professional sports league ever created in Taiwan, but has been plagued by a series of match-fixing scandals starting from 1996. However, the 2009 scandal happened to the most popular club, Brother Elephants. The corrupt “Windshield Wiper” ring was the mastermind behind whole affair. Twenty-six former and active players and coaches were involved that put the games’ ethics and integrity in jeopardy. In particular, star players such as Cao Jinhui and Chen Zhiyuan were banished from baseball forever, which certainly shocked the public. Accordingly, the CPBL was again on the verge of disbandment. Facing such a crisis, fans organized a street protest and spontaneously demanded that the government take actions against such an adverse environment. Subsequently, the authorities stipulated several plans in order to revive the “national sport” people used to love.

Abstract

This article examines the manner in which the recent collection D.C. Noir sets out to illuminate the dark urban corners of the so-called “Capital of the World.” I will look at how the neighborhood-based short stories in this collection reveal the urban underbelly of the American nation’s capital, its seedy underworld, the dark side of domestic life and murkiness of family ties, the racialized practices and institutionalized corruption plaguing the great American city. I argue that, through the collective voices of its residents, these stories offer precious insights into life as lived in the various corners of Washington, D.C., and bring to the fore a world populated not only by outcasts and the disenfranchised, but also by law enforcement officers, politicians, and high-profile representatives, similarly acting under the constraints of a dysfunctional city.

Abstract

The Niger Delta of Nigeria rich in oil and gas resources has been plagued with series of armed conflicts characterised by massive youth restiveness. The peaceful coexistence of people in the region is often affected by the nature of oil and gas business determined by the political economy of the Nigerian state. By the statute of the Federal system of Government in Nigeria, all resources within the territorial boundary of the country belong to the Federal Government. The Government then pays a certain 13% derivation fund to the resource bearing states for development. The Federal Government equally sees to the development of the region through its statutory Agencies such as the Niger Delta Development Commission. All these efforts are yet to bring about infrastructural development and human capacity needs of the region. A consequence of this is the armed militancy and cult related violence that has engulfed the region. In this paper, an attempt is made to analyse the socioeconomic requisitions of a reintegration programme for ex-offenders seeking re-entry into mainstream society. An interventionist approach is recommended with effective monitoring and evaluation system for a socioeconomic reintegration of ex-offenders in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

Abstract

Chronic nicotinism has negative effects, both local and systemic. Its local effects are related to both the immediate thermal influence, as well as the toxic action of the substances contained in the smoke. In addition, the microflora colonizing dental plague is changed. The damage and the inflammatory processes that are incurred, affect the bone tissue of the alveolar processes, the mucosa, gums, and the tooth enamel. In this study, the tobacco smoking-related profile of patients being treated by way of implants was determined. Moreover, the relationship between cigarette smoking and pain sensation was assessed in patients undergoing surgical and prosthetic procedures in the oral cavity. The questionnaire survey covered 464 patients receiving prosthetic treatment at the “Dental” Non-Public Health Care Centre in Tomaszow Mazowiecki. The patients answered questions concerning their sex, age, the period of smoking, number of cigarettes smoked per day and the sensation of pain during bone reconstruction, implant placement and prosthetic procedures. The most numerous group of patients treated with implants were women: either non-smoking or smoking for less than 20 years at a level of less than 20 cigarettes a day, and men aged 40-60 years who have been smoking for over 20 years, at more than 20 cigarettes a day. The results of the survey reveal that non-smoking patients felt pain during bone reconstruction, implant placement and prosthetic procedures more frequently.

Abstract

In this commentary, I applaud Glăveanu’s attempts to shake things up and introduce some much-needed disruption into the study of creativity. Glăveanu is a “ big thinker” and he is correct to worry about the growing fragmentation of the field. I share his concern that the so-called “ social psychology of creativity” really isn’t all that social. Most researchers and theorists continue to decontextualize creativity, giving little attention to the cultural and environmental factors that contribute to creativity of performance. Yet Glăveanu also presents some arguments with which I disagree. Most striking is his apparent misunderstanding of the purpose and functioning of the Consensual Assessment Technique (CAT). In addition, I am less surprised than is Glăveanu about the current state of our field. The same narrowing of research questions plagues every branch of the study of psychology. However, the tides may be changing. At the forefront of a reform movement are a number of creativity theorists and journal editors. My own hope is that as researchers are given license to expand their work to include a wide variety of experimental designs, methodologies and contexts, they will adopt as their core mission the promotion of the growth of creativity at the individual, group, societal and multi-cultural levels.

Abstract

This paper is an interdisciplinary analysis of the benefits and limits of political competition. We start from the economic theory of monopoly and extend its implications on matters concerning political action. If the state is defined as the institution that holds the monopoly on coercion over a given territory, are the democratic selection process (internal political competition) and the possibility open to an economic agent to leave for more economically free jurisdictions (international political competition) enough to temper its reach? By referring to the inherent limits that plague collective action, voter rational ignorance, and the possibility of redistributing benefits and incumbent decision-maker collaboration when it comes to trading votes, we argue that democratic competition cannot be considered an effective restraint against political discretion. Because of this, we consider that international political competition can offer better protection against political action. However, even the possibility of voting with one’s feet or observing the political milieu in another territory become manageable if political decision-makers decide to collude at the international level. Also, emigration is an economically costly and psychologically exacting decision that ultimately implies choosing between two state-controlled jurisdictions. Therefore, even the choice of voting with one’s feet is a second-best solution that, in practice, might not prove to be an effective restraint on the state’s monopoly discretion.