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Press. Ong, A. (1987). Spirits of Resistance and Capitalist Discipline: Factory Women in Malaysia . New York: SUNY Press. Pazderic, N. (2013). “Recovering True Selves in the Electro-Spiritual Field of Universal Love.” Cultural Anthropology , 19(2): 196–225. Puttick, E. 2000. “Personal Development: The Spiritualisation and Secularisation of the Human Potential Movement.” In Beyond New Age: Exploring Alternative Spirituality , edited by Sutcliffe, S., Bowman, M.; Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Rose, N. (1998). Inventing Our Selves: Psychology, Power, and

Abstract

The contemporary Romanian school has frequently been a matter of debate; contents, methods, strategies, manuals, authors, analytical programs - they have all been supported, debated, annulled and reconsidered. However… The Ministerial Order that has allowed, in 2012, the introduction of “Personal Development” in the curriculum has opened a path that has not yet accomplished its role of guiding students to themselves and to the optimal variant for the manifestation of their potential; this aspect has even been demonstrated by analytical programs submitted to and edited by well known publishing houses. Therefore, the present study is meant to open an efficient dialog on the necessity of a transdisciplinary and creative approach to personal development.

Abstract

Introduction. Shortage of nurses reported in the EU (European Union) among other causes is related to: non-attractive work conditions, lack of willingness to take up job as a nurse (despite their education), and high risk of professional burnout. Encouraging graduates to take up a job in the profession and remain is a challenge for employers and institutions involved in the problems of modern nursing. Teaching nurses how to: protect themselves from professional burnout, how to combine career ambitions, family needs and above all personal satisfaction is of utmost importance. Amongst possible solutions which enhance planning of career and personal development in a deliberate manner, as is the case in other professions, it may be worth considering the support of a coach.

Aim. Analysis of the professional situation of nurses in the context of need for individual development using the coaching method.

Method. A method of analysis and criticism of the literature was used.

Conclusions and results. Coaching gives an opportunity for conscious planning process of nurse professional development in synchrony with needs and expectations for personal, family and social life. Better stress management, maintaining work-life balance and professional burnout prevention are benefits provided by this approach.

Abstract

In today’s higher education institutions in which sustainable development has been highly emphasized, individuals have changed the understanding of graduates of higher education; as such universities have emerged into a reconstruction period. In such a process, universities have been in need of academicians who are well development in both personal and professional domains. The concept of Lifewide learning, which is an important sustainable development tool, has underlined the fact that people should graduate as wholly-developed people to fulfill the needs of future societies, which releases the idea that academicians are to be role models for students. This study reflects on the research designed to develop and test an instrument that could identify the component of an academician’s Lifewide learning habits. Because of the complex nature of the Lifewide learning, considerable attempts were made in order to handle the process of classifying the cognitive, affective, social, technical and cultural domains related to academicians working in faculties of education. The developed instrument was trialled with 50 academicians, and the data was subjected to an explanatory factor analysis, allowing the identification of 6 sub-dimensions of Lifewide learning. These dimensions appeared to be capable of differentiating between problem-solving, professional habits, cultural interaction, leadership, care-based habits and leisure habits of academicians. The final version of the scale was applied to 211 academicians from faculties of education at 30 universities via “Google Drive”, and Lifewide habits of related people were assessed regarding their gender, title and department. Depending on the collected data, Lifewide learning habits of academicians were discussed, and some suggestions were proposed to support their professional and personal development.

Review 62 (4):821–842. McQuaid, R.; Green, A.; Danson, M. (2005). Introducing employability. Urban Studies 42 (2): 191–195. Morgen, S.; Gonzales, L. (2008). The Neoliberal American Dream as Daydream: Counter-hegemonic Perspectives on Welfare Restructuring in the United States. Critique of Anthropology 28 (2): 219–236. Pagis, M. (2016). Fashioning Futures: Life Coaching and the Self-Made Identity Paradox. Sociological Forum 31(4): 1083–1103. Petrovici, N. (2015). Personal Development and the Flexible Contracts: Depoliticized Class Struggles between Highly Skilled

Abstract

The rapid growth of modern services industry in Poland, observed in the past few years, has been substantially determined by the vast talent pool of well-qualified and cost-efficient workers. The intensive expansion of the industry has been aligned with widely implemented policies of personal development and leadership, aimed to grow and prepare internal human resources for more challenging roles in newly established projects and teams. The paper presents the results of empirical research examining the perception of those schemes and policies, from the perspective of workers employed in the polish offshore service delivery centers.

Abstract

Higher education is in turmoil in the whole world. Universities as organizations are being challenged by their various stakeholders. This is true of any and most organizations. Nevertheless in some places universities continue to be looked upon as providers of the correct answers to those challenges as they have rallied within their ranks self-proclaimed experts in leadership, management and organizational performance. The literature existing documents the issues universities as organizations face in today’s complex world and attempts at pointing at various ways they can take to address those challenges. Specialists and sometimes the general public itself show an understanding of the fact that higher education evolves through its institutions, practices and processes at some paces in global contexts and at different ones in local contexts in spite of a relatively unifying public discourse used especially by decision and policy makers and some parts of the media. In other words, similar concepts may refer to very dissimilar realities making the evaluation of performance difficult and questionable. This paper looks at the way universities address the need for professional development of their leaders and/or managers at the various university levels. The focus will be on Romanian economic and business higher education institutions. The research presented here evolved from a doctoral study one the authors did in the field of leadership in Romanian higher education and from both authors’ experience in the university system in Romania and in other higher education systems they are familiar with. The authors claim and document that in Romania little is still done in terms of formalized, transparent and open access training for university leaders and administrators. The same is true for those who are interested in preparing for a career in academic management or leadership and do not have a clear road map to follow. In the complex higher education system of today professional competence is an important component that cannot be left entirely to personal development needs. Formalized and open access training in management, leadership, educational management, research management, organizational culture, strategic planning and time management skills is critical for one’s professional competence. In Romania both organizations and individuals need to understand the need to offer opportunities for professional training and the need to invest in personal development. This is how academics working or contemplating to work in administration would be empowered to plan for their organization’s performance in an open, transparent, continually and unpredictably changing world.

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to inform as many persons as possible on the present situation of doctors in Romania, to present more theoretical and practical elements that lead to the development of a sustainable career in the Romanian medical system. So I tried to get as much information about the current situation of the medical system, to obtain a certain confirmation of what was said by those working in the system. Gradually, I found out about the hospital problems, the insufficient budget allocated annually by the mismanagement, media campaigns of doctor denigration, the increasingly precarious health conditions of Romanians, the colossal businesses of the pharmaceutical industry, the heavily discussed and postponed Health Law, that managed to pull a lot of people in the street, and many other items that are not only intended to sound an alarm regarding the condition of medical workers in Romania. Besides the researches and the relationships on the medical education status, the situation of available positions, the distribution of doctors, their salaries, the legal and ethical operating framework, I undertook also a study among physicians (especially those being at their early career) to find out the elements that led them to choose this career and what is the current situation of medical career in Romania. For this, I chose questions that reflect the doctors’ satisfaction at workplace and how performance is influenced by the satisfaction level obtained from the medical services provided in the Romanian healthcare facilities. The study had both expected results, already knowing the current situation, but also unexpected, given the expectations of doctors. In more detail, there is a large number of young doctors that before thinking about work at a prestigious hospital abroad, think to what extent the current workplace in Romania offers support for family, pension, holidays etc. Thus, we considered appropriate to bring up within the paper the current possibilities for personal development, the personal brand in various mediums of communication. This paper could be a viable support to provide the necessary elements in creating an upward career path for young doctors. This paper aims primarily to present a current situation of the medical system, more statistical data (unfortunately, statistics regarding the Romanian medical system are not very up to date, most information relates to the year 2007-2009 - 2010), but also the Romanian situation seen from outside or media. The situation is far from being optimistic, the presented data are clear signals of alarm on the present status, but we hope that in the end, this paper has managed to arouse the interest of Romanian doctors with potential on the possibilities and opportunities for a career development in the homeland.

Abstract

The article presents the original concept of the Author's creative workshop which is treated as an art form and the method of education. It contains a presentation of the structure of the original workshop developed by the Author in the context of multi-layered relations occurring in the interconnected areas of art and education leading to subjective development.

Education , 17 , 421–441. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1123/jtpe.17.4.421 . Papaioannou, A., Milosis, D., Kosmidou, E., & Tsiggilis, N. (2002). Multidimensional structure of goal orientations: The importance of adopting a personal development goal in physical education. Psychology , 9(4), 494–513. Pitsi, A., Diggelidis, N., & Filippou, F. (2013). Construction Scale Classified Criteria (rubric) for the Evaluation of Greek Traditional Dance. Validity and Reliability. Inquiries in Sport & Physical Education , 11(2) , 79–98. Rokka, St., Mavridis, G., Mavridou, Z