Search Results

1 - 10 of 58 items :

Clear All
History as Story and Parody in Julian Barnes’s the Noise of Time

References Barnes, Julian. 2016. The Noise of Time . New York: Alfred A. Knopf Currie, Mark. 1998. Postmodern Narrative Theory . New York: Palgrave. Holmes, Frederick M. 1997. The Historical Imagination: Postmodernism and the Treatment of the Past in Contemporary British Fiction. Founding Editor: Samuel L. Macey. General Editor: Robert M. Schuler. English Literary Studies Monograph Series, No. 73. Victoria: University of Victoria. Hutcheon, Linda. 2000 (1985). A Theory of Parody. The Teachings of Twentieth-Century Art Forms . Urbana

Open access
Parody and Pastiche of Satirical Romanian Press

Abstract

Satirical Romanian press use irony form with the purpose to transpose realities in acid writing and to reform the problems which exist in our society. This study presents one of the most known ways to express irony: intertextuality. Through a series of examples extracted from the satirical press we will try to observe the role that the parody and the pastiche – as important elements of the intertextuality – hold in the expression of irony, but also the impact that they have on the reader.

Open access
The Goldfish and Little Red Riding Hood: Characters and their Combinations in Fairy Tale Jokes and Parodies

–91. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/00155870220125462 . Dundes, Alan. 1971. A Study of Ethnic Slurs: The Jew and the Polack in the United States Source. – Journal of American Folklore 84 (332): 186– 203. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2307/538989 . Ennis, Mary Louise. 1997. Fractured Fairy Tales: Parodies for the Salon and Foire. – Out of the Woods: The Origins of the Literary Fairy Tale in Italy and France , edited by Nancy L. Canepa. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 221–246. Gaidar, Arkadi. 1943 [1940]. Timur and His Gang . New York, NY

Open access
Meta-parody in contemporary Russian media: viewpoint blending behind Dmitry Bykov’s 2009 poem “Infectious”

). Hougaard, A., & Oakley, T. (eds.). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Hutcheon, L. (2000). A theory of parody: the teachings of twentieth-century art forms (Reprint edition). Urbana-Chicago: University of Illinois Press. Hutcheon, L. (2002). The politics of postmodernism (2nd edition). London-New York: Routledge. Hutchings, S., & Tolz, V. (2015). Nation, ethnicity and race on Russian television: mediating post-Soviet difference. (BASEES/Routledge Series on Russian and East European Studies). Abingdon

Open access
Gender, Humour and Transgression in Canadian Women’s Theatre

Exhibition”, University of Saskatchewan. December 2013. <http://library.usask.ca/herstory/herstory.html>. Hobbes, Thomas. Leviathan. London: Penguin, 1988. Print. Homer. The Iliad. Trans. Robert Fitzgerald. New York: Doubleday, 1989. Print. Hutcheon, Linda. A Theory of Parody: The Teachings of Twentieth-Century Art Forms. New York: Methuen, 1985. Print. Irigaray, Luce. Speculum of the Other Woman. Trans. Gillian Gill. Ithaca: Cornell University Press P, 1985. Print ---. This Sex Which Is Not One. Trans

Open access
The Real, Imaginary and Possible in Robert Coover’s Short Story “Stick Man” (2005)

Abstract

In the context of Baudrillard’s theory of simulacra, this paper analyzes Robert Coover’s depiction of different versions of “reality” as manifested in his short story “Stick Man”. The paper argues that through the depiction of transworld characters oscillating between different ontological levels and modes of representation, Coover

  1. treats the relation between fiction and reality,
  2. deals, in the context of some post-structuralist theories, with a question of representation connected especially with the relation between language and reality,
  3. parodies celebrity culture, mass media manipulation of the audience and consumerism as important aspects of contemporary (American) culture, and points out the replacement of the representation by “simulation” in the contemporary technologically advanced world.

Open access
in CLEaR
The Rogue as an Artist in Patrick deWitt’s The Sisters Brothers

Abstract

This article explores Eli Sisters as a reinvigorated rogue who finds his artistic calling in Patrick deWitt’s The Sisters Brothers, published in 2011. With the help of insights from narratology and genre theory, the article provides a textual analysis of Eli’s discourse, perspective and behaviour. Eli casts a critical light on the senseless violence, unbridled greed, ecological devastation, and hyper-masculinity inherent to America’s Frontier myth. As a reinvigorated rogue, he raises questions about what it means to be human and reflects upon morality. With hindsight, the rogue as an artist creates a generically hybrid narrative that parodically imitates and transforms the genre conventions of the Western and the picaresque tale. The article also draws attention to the power that Eli assigns to women in a story about male heroic conquest. These include otherworldly female figures from classical mythology and the brothers’ mother.

Open access
Metafiction in contemporary English-language prose: Narrative and stylistic aspects

hermeneutics of narrative transgression . Berlin-Boston: De Gruyter. Harris, J. (2001). The blackberry wine . Edinburgh: Black Swan. Hutcheon, L. (1980). Narcissistic narrative. The metafictional paradox . Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. Hutcheon, L. (1988). A poetics of postmodernism. History, theory, fiction . New York: Routledge. Hutcheon, L. (2000). A theory of parody: The teachings of twentieth-century art forms (Reprint edition). Urbana-Chicago: University of Illinois Press. Ingersoll, E.G. (2001). Engendering metafiction

Open access
A Japanese-American Sam Spade: The Metaphysical Detective in Death in Little Tokyo, by Dale Furutani

. “The politics of parody.” The Politics of Postmodernism. London and New York: Routledge, 1989. Print. Internment Archives. Internmentarchives.com. N.d. Web. 29 November 2016. Jameson, Fredric. Cognitive Mapping. In: Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture, ed. C. Nelson and L. Grossberg. Champaign, IL: U of Illinois P, 1990. 347-360. Print. Karlsson, A. “The hyperrealistic short story: a postmodern twilight zone.” In: Criticism in the twilight zone: postmodern perspectives in literature and politics, ed. D. Fjellestad

Open access
Shakespeare’s Hamlet/Hamlet, Shakespeare 3.0, and Tugged Hamlet, The Comic Prince of The Polish Cabaret POTEM

Abstract

Shakespeare’s dramas are potentialities. Any Hamlet may be understood as the space in which Shakespeare’s thoughts are remembered, as a reproduced copy of the unspecified, unidentified source, the so called original. Simultaneously, it may be conceived of as the space where Shakespeare’s legacy and authority is tested, trifled and transgressed. Nowadays Shakespeare’s dramas are disseminated in multifarious forms such as: printed materials, audio and video recordings, compact audio discs, digital videos and disc recordings. Since I am fond of the cultural phenomenon called Hamlet, not a singe text or performance, but a continuum of human interaction with intermediated and transcoded versions of the drama, in this article I focus on the abovementioned single play. I accentuate the title character’s profound meaning in Shakespeare studies and his iconic status in Western culture in different media. I exploit W.B. Worthen’s concept of “Shakespeare 3.0.” to demonstrate Shakespeare’s presence in digital reality on the example of a comic rendering of Hamlet (Tugged Hamlet, 1992) by the Polish cabaret POTEM. Their cabaret sketch, although it was not created for the Internet audience, is available on-line via YouTube, consituting “Shakespeare 3.0.” Furthermore, I pose several questions and attempt to answer them in the course of my analysis: to what extent does the image of a mournful and contemplative Hamlet pervade different dimensions of culture, especially our collective imagination?; what chances of realization has a cultural fantasy of challenging the myth of a witty and contemplative Hamlet when re-written and presented as a pastiche or satire?; was the Polish cabaret POTEM succesful in their comic performance?

Open access