Search Results

1 - 10 of 66 items :

  • "orthodontics" x
Clear All
Examination of Scanner Precision by Analysing Orthodontic Parameters

://www.gom.com/metrology-systems/atos/atos-triple-scan.html 11. Mujanović E. Uporaba optičnih 3D skenerjev za določanje položaja zob pri uporabi stalnega zobnega aparata, Fakulteta za strojništvo Ljubljana, 2016. 12. Majstorović N, Mačužić J, Glišić B. Referent geometric entities in orthodontics on 3D models. Serb Dent J, 2014; 61:102-112. 13. The American Board of Orthodontics (ABO). Digital Model Requirements, https://www.american boardortho.com

Open access
Clinicians' Choices in Selecting Orthodontic Archwires

References 1. Kusy RP. A review of contemporary archwires: their properties and characteristics. AngleOrthod.1997;67(3):197-208. 2. W. R. Proffi t and H. W. Fields. Contemporary Orthodontics. Mosby, St. Louis, Mo, USA, 3rd edition, 2000, 405-410. 3. Abhishek Agwarwal , D. K. Agarwal. Newer orthodontic wires: A Revolution in orthodontics. The orthodontic Cyber Journal. April, 2011 Available from URL: http://orthocj.com/2011/04/newer-orthodontic-wires-a-revolutionin- orthodontics/ 4. Garrec Pascal

Open access
T-Scan III System Diagnostic Tool for Digital Occlusal Analysis in Orthodontics – a Modern Approach

Cohen-Lévy, Nicolas Cohen. Computerized occlusal analysis in dentofacial orthopedics: indications and clinical use of the T-scan III system. Journal of Dentofacial Anomalies and Orthodontics. Vol. 15, Issue 02, January 2012. 7. Baldini, A. Beraldi, A. Nanussi. Importanza clinica della valutazione computerizzata dell'occlusione. DEN TAL CADMOS. 2009, April; 77(4). 8. An W, Wang B, Bai Y. Occlusal contacts during pro trusion and lateral movements after orthodontic treat ment. Hua Xi Kou Qiang Yi Za Zhi. 2011 Dec; 29(6): 614–7. 9. He Shu-zhen, Li Song, Gao Xiao

Open access
in PRILOZI
Relationship between Orthodontics and Temporomandibular Disorders

-2009;30:202-204. 3. Droukas V. Function and dysfunction of the stomatognathic system. 3d ed. 2008, Athens: Scientific Publications Parisianos A.E. 4. Athanasiou AE. Orthodontics and craniomandibular disorders. Bishara SE (ed.) Textbook of Orthodontics. 2001, Philadelphia: W.B Saunders Company. 5. Graber TM, Rakosi T, Petrovic AG, Dentofacial Orthopedics with functional appliances. 2nd ed., St.Louis: Mosby-Year Book, Inc., 1997. 6. Barbosa TS, Luana Miyakoda LS, Pocztaruk RL, Rocha CP, Gaviao MBD. Temporomandibular disorders and

Open access
Correlation Between Orthodontic Forces and Root Resorption – a Systematic Review of the Literature

REFERENCES 1. Alfuriji S, Alhazmi N, Alhamlan N, et al The Effect of Orthodontic Therapy on Periodontal Health. International Journal of Dentistry . 2014;2014:6. Article ID 585048 2. Scheibel PC, Ramos AL, Iwaki LCV, Micheletti KR. Analysis of correlation between initial alveolar bone density and apical root resorption after 12 months of orthodontic treatment without extraction. Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics . 2014;19(5):97-102. 3. Jung Y-H, Cho B-H. External root resorption after orthodontic treatment: a study of contributing factors

Open access
Original Research. Correlation Between Cranial Base Morphology And Various Types Of Skeletal Anomalies

Abstract

Background: Previous studies regarding various types of malocclusions have found correlations between the angle of the base of the skull and prognathism. Aim of the study: This cephalometric study sought to investigate the function of the cranium base angle in different types of malocclusion on a group of Romanian subjects. Materials and methods: Forty-four cephalometric radiographs were selected from patients referred to orthodontic treatment. The cephalometric records were digitized, and with the CorelDRAW Graphics Suite X5 software 22 landmarks have been marked on each radiograph. A number of linear and angular variables were calculated. Results: The angle of the base of the skull was found to be higher in Class II Division 1 subjects compared to the Class I group. The cranial base lengths, N-S and S-Ba, were significantly larger in both categories of Class II malocclusion than in Class I patients, but measurements were comparable in Class I and Class III. The SNA angle showed no considerable variation between Class I subjects and the other groups. SNA-SNP was significantly increased above Class I values in Class II Division1 and Class II Division 2 groups. No significant dissimilarities were observed for these lengths between Class I and Class III patients. Conclusions: The angle of the cranium base (S-N-Ba, S-N-Ar) does not have a major role in the progression of malocclusion. In Angle Class II malocclusion the SNA angle is increased, and SNB is increased in malocclusion Class III. The anterior skull base length is increased in Class II anomalies. The length of the maxillary bone base is increased in Class II malocclusions type; in Class III type of malocclusion the length of the mandible bone is increased.

Open access
Detection and Quantification of Periodontopathogenic Bacteria in Subgingival Plaque Samples on Patients Undergoing Orthodontic Treatment

Abstract

Introduction: According to last years' research, periodontopathogens may have a negative impact on treatment options in patients with periodontal lesions. However, not all infected sites suffer periodontal destructions, which can be explained on the assumption that only a limited number of pathogens present in a sufficient amount, are capable of affecting the periodontal tissue. Thermal cycling polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a new technique used for the identification and quantification of periodontopathogenic bacteria. The aim of our study was to confirm the presence of periodontal pathogens, and to evaluate the amount of microbacterial pathogens in the periodontal pockets of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment for a more predictable result.

Material and methods: A total amount of 32 subgingival samples were collected from periodontal pockets ≥6 mm in 8 patients. Clinical examinations, periapical radiographs and periodontal screenings were performed. Only patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances were included in the study. PCR and DNA hybridization-based identification were performed by paper-point sampling using a micro-IDent plus, Hain Lifescience Germany kit.

Results and Discussions: Results showed that bacterial load may be connected to disease progression. The prevalence of the periodontopathogenic bacteria Actinobacillus a. was established in 42.8% of cases, P. Gingivalis in 71.42%, P. Intermedia 57.14%, Bacteroides F. was found in 85.71% of cases, Treponema D. in 100% of cases. Extremely high bacterial loads were recorded for Actinobacillus a., Bacteroides F. and Prevotella I.

Open access
Surface Analysis for Signs of Corrosion of Fixed Orthodontic Appliances Used In Vivo

Abstract

The objective was to evaluate and assess the surface quality of fixed orthodontic appliances after intraoral usage for several months. Nine sets of orthodontic brackets by three different manufacturers and twelve archwires differing in chemical composition were analyzed in a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer for signs of corrosion. Obtained results showed that the majority of the evaluated appliances displayed no traces of corrosion. Machining or casting defects hardly ever act as the origins of corrosion processes. However, some samples displayed signs of corrosion of a galvanic and pitting nature. The authors claim, that despite the surface defects, most of the appliances were able to retain the desired corrosion resistance, although in some cases these flaws could act as the origin of corrosion processes.

Open access
Clinical evaluation of periodontal health during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances

-facial Orthop, 1994,105:450-456. 4. Putt M. Milleman J, Delaurenti M, Jenkins W, Wei J, Strate I. Comparison of plaque removal in orthodontics subjects by sonicare FlexCare and a manual brush. J Dent Res 87 (spec issue 8), 2008,2044-2050. 5. Sharma NC, Lyle DM, Qaquish JG, galustians J, Schuller R. Effect of a dental water jet with orthodontic tip on plaque and bleeding in adolescent patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. Am J of Orthod. & Dentofacial Orthopedics, 2008, 133(4):565-571. 6. Chapman JA, Roberts WE, Eckert GJ

Open access
White Spot Lesions: Prevention and Management During the Orthodontic Treatment

; 19: 199–205. 8. Gorelick L, Geiger AM, Gwinnet AJ. Incidence of white spot formation after bonding and banding. Am J Orthod. 1982; 81: 93–8. 9. Boersma JG, van der Veen MH, Lagerweij MD, Bokhout B. Caries prevalence measured with QLF after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances: influencing factors. Caries Res. 2005; 39: 41–7. 10. Øgaard B, Bishara SE, Duschner H. Enamel effects during bonding-debonding and treatment with fixed appliances. In: Graber TM, Eliades T, Athanasiou AE: Risk Management in Orthodontics: Experts Guide to Malpractice. Hanover Park

Open access
in PRILOZI