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Quality of Organic Vegetables Grown in Two Certified Sites on the Outskirts of Bucharest Municipality

Abstract

Soil fertility properties, irrigation water quality, mineral nutrition, and some vegetables mineral composition were studied in the frame of a project regarding yield quality monitoring in certified organic vegetable farms, in two farms placed on the outskirts of Bucharest Municipality which provide products for the town’s organic market. Chemical analysis of the soil samples collected from the two farms reflects a good fertility, close to the natural one of this region soils, with well-balanced organic matter, total nitrogen, accessible phosphorus and potassium contents. The nitrates contents concord with the plants nutrition demands and don’t present the risk to accumulate in vegetables or to leach into the groundwater. Slightly increased microelements, both total and soluble forms, occur. Soil microbiological properties are favorable for vegetable plants growth. A good biodiversity is noticed. There are differences between soil properties in open field and greenhouses, induced both by the type and degree of mechanical works and materials applied for fertilization and plant protection. Good conditions are generally created for plants mineral nutrition. Mineral nutrition status of the vegetables grown in organic conditions, assessed by the leaves mineral composition, doesn’t differ from the one of the vegetables grown in conventional conditions. The vegetables (fresh material) harvested from the two studied farms have good, even high, concentrations of mineral elements important for the yield nutritional quality. The excessive microelements quantities noticed in soil don’t transfer in the yield, so the latter quality and nutritional properties are not altered.

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Postharvest Practices for Organically Grown Products

Summary

Quality of produce cannot be improved after harvest, only maintained. Postharvest handling depends on the specific conditions of production, season, method of handling, and distance to market. Under organic production, growers harvest and market their produce at or near the peak ripeness more commonly than in many conventional systems. Organic production often includes more specialty varieties whose shelf life and shipping traits are reduced or even inherently poor. Harvesting and handling techniques that minimize injury to the commodity, as well as increased care with field and packinghouse sanitation, (chlorine, ozone, calcium hypochlorite, sodium hypochlorite and chlorine dioxide, acetic acid, peroxyacetic acid, vinegar, ethyl alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, etc.) during postharvest processes are vital components of a postharvest management plan for organic products. Sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, and physical treatments such as heat treatments (as hot water treatment or dips, short hot water rinsing and brushing or hot air) can significantly lower the disease pressure on the harvested commodities. These sanitation practices are very easy to implement in the organic food production chain. They start in the field and continue during harvesting, sorting, packing, and transportation and continue even in the consumer’s home. All those treatments reduce rot development, provide quarantine security, and preserve fruit quality during cold storage and shelf life. In addition, the use chitosan, propolis, methyl jasmonate, essential oils, carnuba wax, biocontrol agents and modified atmosphere packaging can also reduce decay development during prolonged storage. All these treatments can be applied alone or in combination with each other in order to improve decay control after harvest and provide a healthy and safe product to the consumer. The aim of this chapter is to shed more light on the latest information on permitted treatments for organic products and on the possible mode-of-action of these treatments. This chapter summarizes technologies developed over the past five years that explore special physical treatments applied either directly, or in combination with other means to control rot development and insect infestation on fresh produce.

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Level and Structure of Inputs in Specialist Farms

Abstract

The objective of the paper is to determine the size of human and objectified labour in selected specialist vegetable farms. The paper covered studies carried out in the area of southern Poland in 50 organic vegetable farms. Based on the detailed studies, the size and structure of work, and energy inputs used in the production process were determined. The highest inputs of labour per a unit of the production area and 1 tonne of a product were incurred in production of Cucurbita vegetables – 1883.1 and 547.74 man-hour, while the lowest of Solanacea vegetables – 342.8 and 7.11 man-hour. From among all analysed groups of plants, the highest energy inputs were incurred in cultivation of root and onion vegetables and they were three times higher than in traditional farms. Contrary, the lowest inputs were incurred in cultivation of brassica and Solanaceae vegetables.

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Factors Influencing Green Roof Development in Recife, Brazil

Abstract

In Recife, Brazil, population growth and development of buildings in the Central region generated an increase of almost 70% in the last 20 years due to the large number of companies that have been allocated in the city generating an increase in the local economy and the significant population increase, creating huge heat islands. Due to this, a new technology has been implemented in the real estate market: The green roofs, a technology of sustainable coverage that allows implantation of soil and vegetation in a waterproofed layer on the constructions. The benefits of this technology include the reduction of temperature by consumption of CO2, a good option for storing rainwater for nonpotable purposes and the possibility of growing organic vegetable gardens for own consumption or sale, generating a new form of income. The aim of the research is to evaluate the factors that interfere with the introduction of sustainable coverage technology of green roofs in the present siting of the city. In this article, the factors that interfere with the implementation of green roof technology in the present siting of the city will be evaluated, focusing on the analysis of internal and external influencing factor. Comparison, historical, statistical data analysis, induction, logical access methods and external and internal influencing factor analysis were used in the research besides the practical development of arguments and graphical representation of research results.

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Study on the Varieties Influnce of Strawberries Productivity Grown in South of Teleorman County

5. REFERENCES [1]Agnes Gedda, 2006– „Organic vegetable garden” – Polirom Publisher. [2]Ciofu Ruxandra, 2004 - „Treaty gardening”, Ceres Publisher, Bucharest. [3]Chira Lenuta, 2004 – „Culture shrubs”, MATS Publisher, Bucharest. [4]David Picha, 2006 – „Guide to post harvest strawberries in Moldova”, Ceres Publisher, Bucharest. [5]Dragos Serban, 2006– „Strawberry. Methods for cutivation of strawberries”, Polirom Publisher, Bucharest. [6]Grigore Mihailescu, 1987 – „Strawberry field and solariums”, Ceres Publisher, Bucharest

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Pregnant women’s attitudes towards organic food

consumption during pregnancy; data from a large cohort of pregnant women in Norway. BMC Public Health. 2012;12(1):612. doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-12-612. 5. Torjusen H, Brantsaeter AL, Haugen M, et al. Reduced risk of pre-eclampsia with organic vegetable consumption: results from the prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. BMJ Open. 2014;4(9). doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006143. 6. Stupnicki R. Analiza i prezentacja danych ankietowych. Warszawa: Wyd. Akademia Wychowania Fizycznego; 2003. 7. Stanisz A. Przystępny kurs statystyki na przykładach z

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Analysis of Soft Skills of Production Workers in the Context of Product Quality with an Example of Organic Mills

Wydawnicza Stowarzyszenia Menedżerów Jakości i Produkcji, Częstochowa. Szaban, J.M., 2012. Zachowania organizacyjne. Aspekt międzykulturowy , Adam Marszałek, Toruń. Torjusen, H., Brantsćter, A.L., Haugen, M., Alexander, J., Bakketeig, L.S., Lieblein, G., Stigum, H., Nćs, T., Swartz, J., Holmboe-Ottesen, G., Roos, G., iMeltzer, H.M., 2014. Reduced Risk of Pre-eclampsia with Organic Vegetable Consumption. Results from the Prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study ,, BMJ Open, 4 (9), http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006143 . Tyburski, J

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Analysis of Consumer Preferences at Organic Food Purchase in Romania

organic products? A means-end study with evidence from Italian data. 2002, DIIGA, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy. Available at: [ http://www.skymax-dg.it/mecanalyst/papers/chania.pdf ]. 17. O’Donovan P., Mc Carthy M., Irish consumer preference for organic meat. Brit. Food J., 2002,104, 2–4, 353–370. 18. Pieniak Z., Aertsens J., Verbeke W., Subjective and objective knowledge as determinants of organic vegetables consumption. Food Qual. Pref., 2010, 21, 6, 581–588. 19. Pop N. Al., Dabija D.C., The Changing Business Landscape of Romania

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When Consumers are in Doubt, You Better Watch Out! The Moderating Role of Consumer Skepticism and Subjective Knowledge in the Context of Organic Food Consumption

.74.6.1. Petljak, K., Štulec, I., & Renko. S. (2017). Consumer’s willingness to pay more for organic food in Croatia, Ekonomski vijesnik – Review of Contemporary Entrepreneurship, Business, and Economic Issues, 30(2), 441-465. Pieniak, Z., Aertsens, J. & Verbeke, W. (2010). Subjective and objective knowledge as determinants of organic vegetables consumption. Food quality and preference, 21(6), 581-588. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodqual.2010.03.004 Schwartz, S.H. (1977). Normative influences on altruism. In Berkowitz, L. (Ed.). Advances in Experimental

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Living Mulches in Field Cultivation of Vegetables

be managed to benefit horticulture? Hort. Sci. 21: 411-412. Redfearn D.D., Buxton D.R., Devine T.E. 1999. Sorghum intercropping effects on yield, morphology, and quality of forage soybean. Crop Science 39: 1380-1384. Riechert S.E., Bishop L. 1990. Prey control by an assemblage of generalist predators, spiders in garden test systems. Ecology 71: 1441-1450. Riley H., Dragland S. 2002. Living and surface mulches as nutrient sources in organic vegetable crowing. Workshop Towards and

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