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Medical tourism market trends - an exploratory research

References Allen K; (2011). The making of medical subjects: medical tourism and its adherence to neoliberal ideologies , ProQuest LLC. Guy, B. S., Henson, J. L. N., & Dotson, M. J. (2015). Characteristics of consumers likely and unlikely to participate in medical tourism. International Journal of Healthcare Management , 8 (2), 68-76. Bookman M., Bookman, K. (2007). Medical tourism in developing countries , Palgrave Macmillan, New York. Castro Lotero A, (2013). Medical Tourism Sustainable Development, Medical Tourism Magazine November

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Medical tourism by Indian-South Africans to India: an exploratory investigation

References Ben-Natan, M., Ben-Sefer E. and Ehrenfeld, M., 2009: Medical Tourism: A New Role for Nursing. In: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing , Vol. 14, pp. 8-18. DOI: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol14No03PPT0 Byrne, J.P., 2012: Ayurvedic Medicine. In: Kaminsky, A.P. and Long, R.D. editors, India today: an encyclopedia of life in the republic, Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, pp. 71-72. Chaudhry, P.K., Kelkar, V.L. and Yadav, V. , 2004: The evolution of ‘homegrown conditionality’ in India: IMF relations. In: The Journal of Development Studies , Vol. 40

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A Qualitative Research on Medical Tourism Potential of Alanya/Turkey in the Concept of International Service Trade

References Bies W. & Zacharia L., (2007) Medical Tourism: Outsourcing Surgery. Mathematical and Computer Modelling, 46, 1144-1159. Bookman M.Z. & Bookman K.R., (2007) Medical Tourism in Developing Countries. New York: Palgrave Macmillian. Connell J., (2006) Medical Tourism: Sea, Sun, Sand and Surgery. Tourism Management, 27, 1093-1100 Connell J. (2011) Medical Tourism, Bodmin: Cabi. Connell J., (2013) Medical Tourism in the Caribbean Islands: A Cure for Economies in Crisis?. Island Studies Journal, 8(1): 115

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Intellectual Property as a Drive for Sustainable Medical Tourism – The Ana Aslan case

://www.wipo.int/classifications/nivilo/nice/index.htm Niechajev I. and Frame J. (2012), “A plea to control medical tourism”, Aesthetic Plastic Surgery , no. 36, p. 202-206 Olins W. (2006), Despre Brand (about the brand) , Bucharest, Romania: Comunicarea.ro, p. 67-69 Paula Herlo (2009), Institutul Ana Aslan in prima pagina, (Ana Aslan Institute in the first page) Ziarul Financiar , URL: http://www.zf.ro/ziarul-de-duminica/reportajul-saptamanii-institutul-ana-aslan-in-paragina-4881257/ . Protocol Relating to the Madrid Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Marks, WIPO website http

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Factors Determining Competitiveness in Healthcare Institutions in Latvia – Results of the EKOSOC-LV National Research Programme

of the Council of 9 March 2011 on the application of patients’ rights in cross-border healthcare. Available from: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/LV/ALL/?uri=CELEX:32011L0024 (accessed 20 December 2018). Anonymous (2014). Health at a Glance: Europe . OECD Publishing, Paris. 131 pp. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/health_glance_eur-2014-en (accessed 20 November 2018). Anonymous (2018). Ārstniecības iestādes, kas reģistrējušās medicīnas tūrisma pakalpojumu sniegšanai [Medical Institutions registered for providing of medical tourism

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Participation in Medical Tourism versus Physical Activity of Patients after Liposuction: What are the Concerns about Health and Quality of Life?

References Alam, M., & Kaminer, M.S. (2010). Liposuction. In B.E. Katz, & N.S. Sadick (Eds.), Body Contouring. Procedures in Cosmetic Dermatology (pp. 69-96). London: Saunders Elsevier. Alsharif, M.J., Labonte, R., & Lu, Z. (2010). Patients beyond borders: a study of medical tourists in four countries. Global Social Policy, 10(3), 315-335. DOI: 10.1177/1468018110380003. Andrei, C.L., Ţigu, G., Drăgoescu, R.M., & Sinescu, C.J. (2014). Analysis of Medical Tourism for Cardiovascular Diseases. Amfiteatru Economic

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Stem cells and medical tourism

Information. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. April 28, 2002 [cited 2014 February 13], Available from: http://stemcells.nih.gov/info/basics/pages/basics1.aspx 12. Sipp D. The rocky road to regulation. Nature Reports: Stem Cells. 23 September 2009 [cited 2014 February 13]; doi: 10.1038/stemcells.2009.125, Available from: http://www.nature.com/stemcells/2009/0909/090923/full/stemcells.2009.125.html 13. Barclay E. Stem-cell experts raise concerns about medical tourism. Lancet. 2009; 373

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Tourism development challenges on the Dead Sea shore

Abstract

The Dead Sea along with Jerusalem belongs to one of the most well-known spots visited by tourists in Israel. Because of many factors, such as the water level of the Dead Sea at a depth of 430 m b.s.l. (in 2015), average salinity of 26%, hot springs and many healing salts located there, it is a unique tourist attraction on a global level. Its attractiveness is heightened by its proximity to other sites of interest, such as the Jewish fortress at Masada, Jericho, Qumran, where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found, as well as Petra, Madaba and Al-Karak on the Jordanian side of the Dead Sea. High salinity and a microclimate create perfect conditions for the development of health resorts and medical tourism. Extracting healing salts from its waters for the needs of the chemical industry is important for both the economy and medical tourism. However, as a consequence of the agricultural and urban use of the waters of the River Jordan, which flows into the Dead Sea, a persistent decrease in the lake water level has been observed over the last century. This has created a number of economic and political issues. The problems which still have to be resolved are associated with the Red Sea-Dead Sea Conduit (Canal), the division of Jordan’s water resources, conservation of the unique reservoir of the Dead Sea and the threat of hindering the development of tourism within the region. The presentation of these issues is the main aim of this research paper. The study is based on the analysis of changes in tourism flows, results of research studies and the prognosis of changes in the water level of the Dead Sea. It presents an assessment of the effects of this phenomenon on the tourist economy. At the current level of tourism flows within the region, the tourist capacity of local beaches will be exceeded in areas where the most popular tourist resorts are located. Increased expenditure on development of tourism infrastructure in the coastal zone can also be observed. The predicted decreasing water level will result in further modifications and expansion of tourism infrastructure, decreased accessibility to the coastline for tourists, increased costs of visiting and may lead to an ecological disaster.

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Medical Waste Management in Al-Basheer State Hospital - Current Situation and Future Prospects

in Korea. Journal of Environmental Management 80 , 107-115. doi:/10.1016/j.jenvman.2005.08.018. [5] UAE Yellow Pages, “Clinics and Hospitals, 2010. http://www.yellowpages.ae/category/clinics-/http://www.scribd.com/doc/4100881/ [6] Middle East Health Care Intelligence, 2010. http://biomedme.com/uae/dubaisclemenceau-medical-center-amongst-topten-best-hospitals-for-medical-tourism_6555.html [7] Country report on the solid waste management in JORDAN, 2014, http

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Identification of the Flow of Innovations in Tourism Related to Aesthetic Medicine

Abstract

Aesthetic medicine is, next to the wellness and spa, one of the most rapidly growing segments of health tourism. Its dynamic growth is closely linked to innovative offers (perhaps better described as “product innovation”). To date, however, there have been no scientific studies focusing on this market. Services in the field of aesthetic medicine are usually discussed descriptively as a subcategory of medical tourism, and innovation in this sector remains unexplored.

In this article we focus on innovation in aesthetic medicine as it pertains to health tourism, using the Delphi method to analyze innovation flow. Twelve experts from the fields of economics and management sciences with backgrounds in innovation and the economics of tourism (including health tourism) were invited to participate in the study. This group included also practitioners. The research was conducted in June and July 2015.

Our research addresses the current dearth of academic works on aesthetic medicine tourism, and lack of any relevant models of its flow and spread.

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