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Affect and Nostalgia in Eva Hoffman’s Lost in Translation

& Robert Hudson. 2013. Affective landscapes: An introduction. Cultural Politics 9(3). 313-322. Boym, Svetlana. 2001. The future of nostalgia. New York: Basic Books. Culler, Jonathan. 2008. Why lyric? PMLA 123(1). 201-206. Dancus, Adriana Margareta. 2011. Diasporic feeling and displaced nostalgia: A case study: Importeksport and Blodsbåxnd [sic]. Scandinavian Studies 83(2). 247-266. Fjellestad, Danuta Zadworna. 1995. The Insertion of the self into the space of borderless possibility: Eva Hoffman’s exiled body

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The Lyric of Objectiveness. "Criticism of Poets" and the Jan Tarasin's Painting

Liryka przedmiotowości. "Krytyka poetów" wobec malarstwa Jana Tarasina

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Economic and Financial Viability Plan for the Enterpreneurship of a Lyric Theatre Low-Cost Company: The Case of Zarzuela in Spain

Abstract

Taking into account that one of the major handicaps when undertaken in the cultural sector is the problem of cost and demand volatility, this paper aims to implement a viability plan for the entrepreneurship of a lyric theatre low-cost company, dedicated to Zarzuela performance, a type of Spanish music like Opera. Firstly, the cultural sector data are analysed in terms of supply and demand and secondly a viability plan is carried out for three years. According to the results it is concluded that this type of venture is very risky if you do not have grant or other financial resources, due to the variability of demand and the increase in unit costs as the artistic performance has a fixed production technology that cannot absorb the technical progress of the rest of the economy.

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Number 13 / Part I. Music. 6. Requiem by Karl Jenkins. An Analytical Approach to The Interweaving of Various Traditions in Music

Abstract

In the diverse space of contemporary music, the fascinating and controversial personality of the Welsh composer Karl Jenkins, which is surprising from several perspectives, stands out. Open to assimilating and processing music from various sources (academic, liturgical, folk, entertainment, oriental, exotic), the all-round musician Karl Jenkins impresses the public with unexpected artistic choices, giving up the hypostasis of instrumentalist of the jazz-rock band Nucleus and of the group Softmachine in favour of the postmodern creator he has become today, synthetizing trends from musical compositions of the last decades of the 20th century. Once with the return to the functional system, either through minimalism or through neo-romanticism, the artist has successfully covered a potential sonority path of modern opposites, also evoking references to creative models of the past. We are referring to the musical valorizing of the sacred in a synthetic vision between tradition and innovation, in the works included in the Adiemus cycle, in the opus choir Missa for Peace and, more particularly, in the Requiem (2005), a significant score in the contemporaneity. The manner in which the composer, while resorting to a musical genre originating from the Roman Catholic cult and drawing on the liturgical text of the Mass for the dead, inserted Japanese poetry, written following the structure of haiku, belonging to representative authors - Gozan Koshigaya, Issho Kosughi, Hokusai Katsushika, Kaga-no-Chiyo, is highly surprising. This study aims to highlight the interweaving imagined by Karl Jenkins between the two cultures as well as to conduct a semantic analysis of an opus in which the relationships between music and words entail a highly emotional response.

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Recalling All the Olympians: W. B. Yeats’s “Beautiful Lofty Things,” On the Boiler and the Agenda of National Rebirth

. Vendler, Helen. Our Secret Discipline. Yeats and Lyric Form. Boston: Belknap, 2007. Print. Wood, Michael. Yeats and Violence. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010. Print. Yeats, J. B. Passages from the Letters of John Butler Yeats: Selected by Ezra Pound. Ed. Ezra Pound. Dublin: Cuala, 1917. Print. Yeats, W. B. The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats: Volume III, Autobiographies. Ed. William H. O’Donnell and Douglas N. Archibald. New York: Scribner, 1999. Print. ---. The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats: Volume IV, Early

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Suburban Identity in the Poetry of John Updike

Abstract

This paper provides a close reading of a representative selection of suburban poems by the American writer John Updike (1932–2009). It also draws upon the existing scholarship by suburban studies historians (including Kenneth Jackson, Dolores Hayden, John Archer, and James Howard Kunstler), who have argued for the cultural importance of American suburbia in fostering identity, and develops the argument by literary critics including Jo Gill, Peter Monacell, and Robert von Hallberg, who have championed the existence of a viable suburban tradition in postwar American poetry. By scrutinizing poems from Updike’s early poetry, represented by “Shillington”, up to his closing lyric opus, “Endpoint”, the paper argues that Updike’s unrecognized importance is that of a major postwar poet whose lyric work chronicles, in memorable, diverse, and important ways, the construction of individual identity within suburbia, in a dominant setting for most Americans from the 1950s up to the present.

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The Shortest Way to Modernity Is via the Margins: J.H. Prynne’s Later Poetry

Abstract

In the essay an attempt is made to investigate the processes of construction and reconstruction of meaning in the later books of the Cambridge poet J.H. Prynne. It has been argued that his poetry disturbs the act of meaning-making in a ceaseless experimental reconnection of words taken from multifarious discourses, ranging from economics to theology. Yet, what appears striking in this poetry is the fact that these lyrics take their force from figurative meaning with which the words are endowed in the process of a poem’s unfolding. Prynne appears to compose his lyrics by juxtaposing words that in themselves (or sometimes in small clusters) do yield a meaning but together exude an aura of unintelligibility. We may see this process as aiming at the destruction of what might be posited as the centre of signification of the modern language by constantly dispersing the meaning to the fringes of understanding. The poems force the reader to look to the margins of their meaning in the sense that the signification of the entire lyric is an unstable composite of figurative meanings of this lyric’s individual words and phrases. To approach this poetry a need arises to read along the lines of what is here termed “fleeting assertion”; it is not that Prynne’s poems debar centre in favour of, for instance, Derridean freeplay but rather that they seek to ever attempt to erect a centre through the influx from the margins of signification. Therefore they call for strong interpretive assertions without which they veer close to an absurdity of incomprehension; however, those assertions must always be geared to accepting disparate significatory influxes. Indeed, interpretation becomes a desperate chase after “seeing anew” with language but, at the same time, a chase that must a priori come to terms with the fact that this new vision will forever remain in the making.

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“Neatly Severing The Body From The Head:” Female Abjection In Margaret Atwood’S The Edible Woman

Abstract

In Margaret Atwood’s fiction and poetry, wounded female bodies are a frequently used metaphor for the central characters’ severe identity crises. Atwood’s female protagonists or lyric personae fight marginalization and victimization and often struggle to position themselves in patriarchal society. In order to maintain the illusion of a stable identity, the characters often disavow parts of themselves and surrender to a subversive memory that plays all sorts of tricks on them. However, these “abject” aspects (J. Kristeva, Powers of Horror) cannot be repressed and keep returning, threatening the women’s only seemingly unified selves: In Surfacing, for example, the protagonist suffers from emotional numbness after an abortion. In The Edible Woman, the protagonist’s crisis results in severe eating disorders and in Cat’s Eye and The Robber Bride the central characters’ conflicts are externalized and projected onto haunting ghost-like trickster figures.

In this paper, I will look at various representations of “wounded bodies and wounded minds” in samples of Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman, focusing on the intersection of memory and identity and analyzing the strategies for healing that Margaret Atwood offers.

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The Truth of Art in David Jones and Hans-Georg Gadamer

References Baker, J. M., Jr. 2002. “Lyric as Paradigm: Hegel and the Speculative Instance of Poetry in Gadamer’s Hermeneutics” in The Cambridge Companion to Gadamer . R. J. Dostal (ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 141-66. Blamires, D. 1971. David Jones: Artist and Writer . Manchester: Manchester University Press. Dilworth, T. 2000. “David Jones and the Maritain Conversation” in David Jones: Diversityin Unity: Studies in his Literary and Visual Art . B. Humphrey and A. Price-Owen (eds

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9. An Analysis of the Vocal Ensembles from the Opera “I Puritani” by Vincenzo Bellini

References 1. Arbore, A. I. - Realizarea spectacolului lyric (Creating A Lyrical Opera Performance), Musical Publishing House, Bucharest, 1992 2. Arbore, A.I. - Interpretul teatrului liric (The Lyrical Theater Interpreter), Musical Publishing House, Bucharest, 1984 3. Arbore, A. I. - Istoria spectacolului liric, Curs litografiat pentru uzul studenţilor (History of Lyrical Opera Performance, Lithographed Course for Students Use), Bucharest, 1983 4. 1. Buga, A. and Sârbu, C.M. - Patru secole de

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