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Some regularities in the distribution of kenophytes in the Polish Carpathians and their foreland

References Kornaś J. & Medwecka-Kornaś A. 2002. Geografia roślin. 634 pp. Wyd. Naukowe, PWN Warszawa. Mirek Z., Piękoś-Mirkowa H., Zając A. & Zając M. 2002. Flowering plants and pteridophytes of Poland. A checklist. In: Z. Mirek (ed.). Biodiversity of Poland, 1, 442 pp. W. Szafer Institute of Botany, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków. Tokarska-Guzik B. 2005. The Establishment and Spread of Alien Plant Species (Kenophytes) in the Flora of Poland. Prace naukowe Uniw. Śląskiego w Katowicach 2372: 1

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Kenophytes in different forest types of Ukraine

Abstract

The article aims to 1) describe the distribution of non-native species of vascular plants (only kenophytes, i. e. naturalized species introduced after the 15th century) in different types of forests and different biogeographical regions of Ukraine; 2) compare proportions of kenophytes in forests of different areas; 3) detect statistically significant changes in the occurrence of kenophytes over the last 80 years. The material consists of 2701 relevés sampled in 1990–2018. They were taken from Ukrainian phytocoenological publications and databases. In Ukraine, as in other European countries, the highest proportion of kenophytes (percentage of species number per relevé) is in floodplain forests (up to 9.1% in willow and poplar forests). The lowest proportion is characteristic for bog woods (0%) and most types of mountain forests. Among biogeographical regions, the highest values were found in the flatland areas of the Steppic region and the forest-steppe part of the Continental region. The most frequent species are Impatiens parviflora (predominantly in broadleaved woods, absent in relevés from the steppic biogeoregion) and Erigeron canadensis (pine woods on sand). Comparison with 1466 older relevés sampled in 1950–1989 allows us to make a conclusion that the proportion of kenophytes increased at least in one habitat type (oak-hornbeam forests).

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Invasive alien plant species of the southern part of the Nowogard Plain (NW Poland)

przybyszach i przybłędach we florze. In: M. Nakonieczny & P. Migula (eds.). Problemy środowiska i jego ochrony 10: 101-127. Centrum Studiów nad Człowiekiem i Środowiskiem, Uniwersytet Śląski, Katowice. Tokarska-Guzik B. 2005. The Establishment and Spread of Alien Plant Species (Kenophytes) in the Flora of Poland. Prace naukowe Uniw. Śląskiego w Katowicach 2372: 1-192. Vila M. & Weiner J. 2004. Are invasive plant species better competitors than native plant species? - evidence from pair-wise experiments. Oikos 105: 229

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The Analysis of the Forest Flora of the Strzyżowskie Foothills from the Perspective of Presence of Anthropogenic Species

-80. Tokarska-Guzik, B. 2005. The establishment and spread of alien plant species (kenophytes) in the flora of Poland. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego, Katowice. Towpasz, K. 1990. Charakterystyka geobotaniczna Pogórza Strzyżowskiego. Rozpr. habil. Uniw. Jagiell. 178: 1-240. Towpasz, K., Stachurska-Swakoń, A. 2008. Alder-ash and willow communities and their diversity in the Pogórze Strzyżowskie foothills (Western Carpathians). Acta Soc. Bot. Pol. 77 (4): 327-338. Towpasz, K., Stachurska-Swakoń, A

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Synanthropization of riparian plant communities in the Ojców National Park (Southern Poland)

Abstract

Although riparian forests are still common in Europe, their variants - similar to natural forests - are rare. They are, as communities, early stages of forest-shrub succession, particularly vulnerable to the expansion of neophytes for which they are an important type of vegetation that enables their spread. In the Ojców National Park (ON P), these types of phytocoenoses are heavily influenced by anthropogenic pressure. The preservation of their biodiversity is particularly difficult because of the fragmentation and small area occupied by the Park - just 2.89 ha. There have been no data on synanthropization of ON P riparian forests until now. The ‘conservation status’ of these communities was determined by examining the degree of anthropophyte participation in their floristic composition. This determination is necessary to take effective preventive measures. In 2012-2014, phytosociological studies were carried out on the ON P riparian communities. A particular attention was paid to the presence and quantitative participation of alien species in research plots. The obtained results revealed that there were 189 plant species in alluvial forests of the ON P, including 80 synanthropic species. The group of synanthropes comprised 32 anthropophytes: 5 diaphytes, 9 archaeophytes and 18 kenophytes.

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Alien vascular plants in the Silesian Upland of Poland: distribution, patterns, impacts and threats

References Baryła J., Bröż E., Czylok A., Michalewska A., Nikiel A., Nobis M., Piwowarczyk R. & Poloczek A. 2005. Typha laxmannii Lepech. The new, expansive kenophyte in Poland: distribution and taxonomy. Acta Soc. Bot. Pol. 74(1): 25-28. Bąba W. J. & Kompała-Bąba A. N. 2008. Communities with Bunias orientalis in human-made habitats of the Silesian Upland (southern Poland). In: B. Tokarska-Guzik, J. H. Brock, G. Brundu, L. Child, C. C. Daehler & P. Pyšek (eds.). Plant Invasions: Human perception

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Synanthropization of dendroflora near main roads in Białystok (NE Poland)

. Tokarska-Guzik B. 2003. The expansion of some alien plant species (neophytes) in Poland. In: L. E. Child, J. H. Brock, G. Brundu, K. Prach, P. Pyšek, P. M. Wade & M. Williamson (eds.). Plant invasions: ecological threats and management solution, pp. 147-167. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, The Netherlands. Tokarska-Guzik B. 2005. The Establishment and Spread of Alien Plant Species (Kenophytes) in the Flora of Poland. Prace naukowe Uniw. Śląskiego w Katowicach 2372: 1-192. Treshew M. 2004. Zanieczyszczenie powietrza a życie roślin. 526 pp. WNT

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Invasion of synanthropic plants into the forest vegetation of the Cedynia Landscape Park (NW Poland)

Plant Taxonomy and Phytogeography, University of Szczecin, Poland. Tokarska-Guzik B. 2005. The Establishment and Spread of Alien Plant Species (Kenophytes) in the Flora of Poland. Prace naukowe Uniw. Śląskiego w Katowicach 2372: 1-192. Trombulak, S. C. & Frissell C. A. 2000. Review of ecological effects of roads on terrestrial and aquatic communities. Conservation Biology 14(1): 18-30. Watkins R. Z., Chen J., Pickens J & Brosofske K. D. 2003. Effects of forest roads on understory plants in a

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Spread of Eragrostis albensis (Poaceae) and Dittrichia graveolens (Asteraceae) in the southern Poland

Abstract

New localities of Eragrostis albensis H. Scholz and Dittrichia graveolens (L.) Greuter have been found in the southern Poland. The former taxon is currently considered a kenophyte (epecophyte and holoagriophyte) in the country. It occurs on sandy alluvia along Vistula, Oder and San River Valleys as well as on anthropogenic sites mainly in the eastern and south-eastern Poland. The latter species is a recent newcomer regarded as an ephemerophyte, which so far has been reported from only one locality in Śląskie Province. In 2017 we discovered 16 new localities of E. albensis and five of D. graveolens on the territory of the southern Poland. Populations of both species consisted of few to several dozen individuals which grew within anthropogenic habitats, mainly roadsides. Distribution maps of both species in the southern Poland were presented.

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Invasive species in the flora of the Starobilsk grass-meadow steppe (Ukraine)

Abstract

The results of an investigation of the invasive species in the flora of the Starobilsk grass-meadow steppe are presented. Check-list of alien plant has over 386 species of vascular plants of which 28 species are invasive. We have identified 6 transformer species from the invasive plants. We aggregate data on the entry, distribution history, ecology, occurrence in different plant communities, degree of their naturalization and the habitats where they occur. The leading families of invasive species are: Asteraceae. The basis for this group is presented by origin from the North America and the Mediterranean. With respect to the time of immigration, most of them are kenophytes. By the method of introduction, ksenophytes are dominated; according to the degree of naturalization epoecophytes and agriophytes dominate in this group. With regard to the characteristics of life forms, half of invasive species are terophytes. The vast majority of plants are heliophytes and xeromesophytes. Most species are found in biotopes group I: Cultivated agricultural biotopes; least of all species found in biotopes group F: Biotopes dominated by chamephytes and nanophanerophytes. Only 3 species found in biotopes group F: Biotopes dominated by chamephytesand nanophanerophytes. The maps of distribution of 28 invasive species are provided. Most of the species marked dispersed in more than 30 squares.

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