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Public Health in the Framework of the International Security. A Constructive Approach

Abstract

The article highlights the fact that public health is an element of the security dimension that must be included on the priority agenda of specialists in the fields of international relations and security studies. There are arguments in favor of this theory. The costs of materializing threats to human security in general and public health in particular are particularly high, with serious long-term consequences. Global trends and prospects for the implications that can be generated are likely to change the world’s security landscape, and increasing global connectivity increases the degree of uncertainty about public health implications. Non-traditional issues arising from technological change can induce risks, whose management may go beyond institutional capacities. On the other hand, the new types of wars, increasingly interconnected with various forms of risk materialization, make this mission more difficult. The final conclusion is that these risks need to be assessed to ensure national, regional or even global security, and international cooperation for prevention and counseling.

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Economic Growth and Investment Activity as Basic Elements and Indicators of Economic Security and Their Relationship with National and International Security

Abstract

The economic potential of a country is directly related to a policy of creating new jobs, increasing labour productivity, balancing energy and materials consumption, technological innovation, refurbishing the production base, and taking action to create an environment for attracting investment and stimulating domestic consumption, as well as increasing exports of goods and services. A key feature of the economic system, that determines its ability to maintain normal living and working conditions for the population, is to guarantee and protect the sustainable development of the economy and the realisation of national economic interests. This article is addressed to two main economic security indicators - economic growth and investment activity of the state. It presents a specific comparison of real GDP per capita and growth rate in the European Union, the Eurozone and the Republic of Bulgaria and GDP per capita in purchasing power standards in the European Union, the Eurozone and the Republic of Bulgaria. The flow of foreign direct investment by economic sectors in the Republic of Bulgaria is been considered, including annual data, foreign direct investment flows by countries and the international position of the Republic of Bulgaria in this process

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Security Aspects of Migrations

Abstract

Migrations as an inevitable fact of socioeconomic trends pose a security challenge for migrant countries, transition countries, and the countries where migrants come as to the ultimate destination. They are realized in a large area with a large number of participants and global consequences. This paper, through the basic determinants of migrations, statistical indicators on migrations, security challenges, risks and threats, migration policy and international security, provides answers to the questions about the numerical movement of migrants from the seventies of the last century to today on a global scale. Responses are also given about the reasons for triggering migrations, the most desirable migrant destinations, and the impact of migrations on security in departure, transit and destination countries. Particular attention is given to the last migration crisis that has largely affected the European Union.

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International Security Presence in Kosovo and its Human Rights Implications

in Kosovo. Harvard Human Rights Journal, 16(95): 95-146. Military Technical Agreement, 1999. Military technical agreement between the international security force (KFOR) and the governments of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Republic of Serbia. 9 June [online]. Available at: http://www.nato.int/kosovo/docu/a990609a.htm (Accessed 5 July 2017). Murphy, R., 2005. UN peacekeeping in Lebanon, Somalia and Kosovo. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, 2002

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Twenty Years of Poland's Euro-Atlantic Foreign Policy

Twenty Years of Poland's Euro-Atlantic Foreign Policy

During the years 1989-1991, after a deep transformation of the internal system and the international order in Europe, Poland pursued a sovereign foreign policy. The new policy had the following general goals: 1) to develop a new international security system which would guarantee Poland's national security; 2) to gain diplomatic support for the reforms conducted in Poland, including primarily the transformation of the economy and its adaption to free market mechanisms, which were designed to result in economic growth; and 3) to maintain and increase the international prestige of Poland and the Poles, who had been the first to commence the struggle to create a democratic civil society in the Eastern bloc. Implementing this new concept of foreign policy, Poland entered the Council of Europe in November 1991. The following year, Warsaw started to strive for membership of NATO, which was achieved in March 1999. A few years later, Polish leaders pursued policies in which Poland played the role of a "Trojan horse" for the USA. This was manifested most clearly during the Iraqi crisis of 2003, and in the following years, particularly in 2005-2007. From spring 1990 Poland aspired to integration with the European Community; in December of the following year it signed an association agreement, which fully entered into force in February 1994. In the period 1998-2002 Poland negotiated successfully with the European Union and finally entered this Union in May 2004. In subsequent years Poland adopted an Eurosceptic and sometimes anti-EU position. The new Polish government, established after the parliamentary election of autumn 2007, moved away from an Eurosceptic policy and pursued a policy of engagement with European integration.

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Private Military and Security Companies: The End of State Responsibility?

Abstract

The objective of this article is to observe the redefinition of state responsibility based on its interaction with Private Military Security Companies. The boom, consolidation and decline of these companies between the end of the Cold War era and the first decade of the 21st century pose a dilemma to international law regarding State responsibility towards security issues within its territory. The lack of effective international law mechanisms and the political agenda of the States are both limitations for preserving human dignity in institutional and humanitarian fragile contexts. Hence, an interdisciplinary approach must be considered in order to seek an alternative path to this dilemma. This research used empirical data and documental analysis to achieve this objective.

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NATO’s ‘Out of Area’ Operations: A Two- Track Approach. The Normative Side of a Military Alliance

References Bowen, W. H., 2006. Spain during World War II. Missouri: University of Missouri Press. Buzan, B., 1997. Cooperation and conflict. London: SAGE Publications. Byman, D. L. and Waxman, M. C., 2000. Kosovo and the great air power debate. International Security, 24(4): 5-38. Caverley, J. D., 2010. The myth of military myopia: democracy, small wars and Vietnam. International Security, 43(3): 119-157. Cohen, R., 2015. From individual security to international stability. In

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Termination of Collective Defense Treties – Procedures, Consequences and Modern State Practice

References [1] Mösslang, Markus, and Torsten Riotte. The Diplomats' World A Cultural History of Diplomacy, 1815-1914. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. [2] Black, Jeremy. A History of Diplomacy. A History of Diplomacy. London: Reaktion, 2011. [3] Kissinger, Henry. Diplomacy. 1994. [4] Lynn-Jones, Sean M., and Steven E. Miller. Global Dangers: Changing Dimensions of International Security. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 1995. [5] Schachter, Oscar. International Law in Theory and

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Integration Trends of EU Internal Security and Law Enforcement: How Legal, Technological and Operational Advancements Matter

Liberal Regimes after 9/11, London & New York: Routledge, pp. 10-49. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203926765.ch2 Burgess, J. P. (2009), ‘There is no European security, only European securities,’ Cooperation and Conflict: Journal of the Nordic International Studies Association, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 309-328. Buzan, B. & Wæver, O. (2003), Regions and Powers. The Structure of International Security, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511491252 Cilluffo, F. J. & Cardash, S. L. (2016), ‘NATO

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Sere Training Implementation in “Nicolae Bălcescu” Land Forces Academy

Abstract

Modern international security environment requires that future leaders training should be polyvalent. This article aims to present the tremendous benefit that SERE training brings in Land Forces officers training and education.

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