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, Koga Y, Hirota S, Yamauchi R (2011) Food Chemistry 126: 1808-1811. Veverka M, Gallovič J, Švajdlenka E, Veverkova E, Pronayova N, Milačkova I, Štefek M (2013) Chemical Papers 67: 76-83. Vinazzer H (1975) Haemostasis 4: 101-109. Viskupičova J, Ondrejovič M, Šturdik E (2008) Journal of Food and Nutrition Research 47: 151-162. Viskupičova J, Danihelova M, Majekova M, Liptaj T, Šturdik E (2012) Journal of Enzyme Inhibition and Medicinal Chemistry 27: 800-809. Walker B, Lynas JF (2001) Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences 58: 596-624. Wu EL, Mei Y, Han K, Zhang JZH (2007

biofilm and healing delay in a porcine model of MRSA-infected wounds. Wound Repair Regen . 2012;20:537-543. 15. Johansen HK, Høiby N. Novel mouse model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis. Infect Immun . 2005;73:2504-2514. 16. de Lima Pimenta A, Chiaradia-Delatorre LD, Mascarello A, et al. Synthetic organic compounds with potential for bacterial biofilm inhibition, a path for the identification of compounds interfering with quorum sensing. Int J Antimicrob Agents . 2013;42:519-523. 17. Balaban N, Cirioni O, Giacometti A, et al

Abstract

In our study we investigated the ability of selected plant extracts to inhibit the formation of biofilms produced by Staphylococcus aureus. In the first phase, we focused on the optimisation of conditions for the correct method of an approach. For optimisation, we standardized the culture media and the bacterial culture in order to obtain interpretable results. The TSB (Tryptone Soya Broth) medium was used for the preparation of an inoculum from the bacterial suspension. For the in vitro tests of antibiofilm activity against the species Staphylococcus aureus CCM 3953, we used propylene glycol (PG) plant extracts from sage and rosemary, prepared in three different concentrations of 0.01 %, 0.05 % and 0.1 %. The tests were implemented in microtitre plates using crystal violet dye at 0.1 % concentration for visualization of the intensity of a biofilm. The results were obtained, by spectrophotometric measurements at a wavelength of 550 nm. Both rosemary and sage plant extracts had a significant effect on the formation of a biofilm by S. aureus. The antibiofilm activity was concentration-dependent as the formation of biofilm was reduced more effectively with increasing concentration of the extracts. The best antibiofilm activity was observed with 0.1 % rosemary extract resulting in 94 % inhibition of the biofilm formation.

, Bikfalvi A, Moenner M. A shift from an angiogenic to invasive phenotype induced in malignant glioma by inhibition of the unfolded protein response sensor IRE1. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107, 15553-15558, 2010. Auf G, Jabouille A, Delugin M, Guerit S, Pineau R, North S, Platonova N, Maitre M, Favereaux A, Vajkoczy P, Seno M, Bikfalvi A, Minchenko D, Minchenko O, Moenner M. High epiregulin expression in human U87 glioma cells relies on IRE1alpha and promotes autocrine growth through EGF receptor. BMC Cancer 13, 597, 2013. Bochkov VN, Philippova M, Oskolkova O, Kadl A

, Bikfalvi A, Moenner M. A shift from an angiogenic to invasive phenotype induced in malignant glioma by inhibition of the unfolded protein response sensor IRE1. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107, 15553-15558, 2010. Auf G, Jabouille A, Delugin M, Guerit S, Pineau R, North S, Platonova N, Maitre M, Favereaux A, Vajkoczy P, Seno M, Bikfalvi A, Minchenko D, Minchenko O, Moenner M. High epiregulin expression in human U87 glioma cells relies on IRE1alpha and promotes autocrine growth through EGF receptor. BMC Cancer 13, 597, 2013. Aziz MH, Chen X, Zhang Q, DeFrain C, Osland J, Luo Y

Abstract

Sage is medicinal plant, known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Eight extract samples were tested in this study: extract from Salvia officinalis L. varieties from two different geographical localities (Jaslovské Bohunice and Pobedim, Slovakia), Salvia officinalis L., variety “bicolor”, Salvia officinalis L., variety “purpurescens”, Salvia apiana, Salvia divinorum, and two callus cultures of Salvia sclarea L. and Salvia aethiopis L. The highest values for composite parameters were observed for extract from Salvia apiana. It can be concluded that prepared sage extract samples are rich on polyphenolic acids (2 950±265 μg.mL−1 GAeq.) and amines (197±5.50 μg.mL−1 TRPeq.). HPLC analysis confirmed the dominant content of rosmarinic acid in the extracts; the highest content was detected in the Salvia apiana extract (1 120±15 μg.mL−1). Extract from Salvia apiana expressed too the highest antioxidant activity (1 710 – 4 669 μg.mL−1TEAC). Similarly, the highest inhibition activity was observed for this extract on thrombin (57±3.3 %) and on other proteinases (over 80 %). Spearman correlation analysis and PCA analyses revealed a coherence between antioxidant activity of samples and their content of rosmarinic acid as well as inhibitory activity towards particular proteases, and revealed the significance of thiol based secondary metabolites. Cluster analysis demonstrates the differences of Salvia apiana extract from extracts of S. officinalis L., the group of S. divinorum extract and from callus cultures.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess cell-free fermented culture broth of 9 Lactobacillus plantarum strains as antibiotic alternatives for the inhibition of in vitro growth of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) isolated from postweaning pigs with colibacillosis and edema disease in 2014. A total of 10 ETEC and 5 STEC strains isolated from postweaning pigs were tested in antimicrobial susceptibility tests. ETEC and STEC strains used in this study possessed at least one of fimbrial, enterotoxin, and Shiga-toxin genes when tested by polymerase chain reaction. Among 9 L. plantarum strains tested, 3 strains (Lp 2-05, 2-06, and 1-03) showed inhibitory activity of in vitro growth against 10 ETEC strains (100%) and 7 strains (Lp 6-13, 3-06, 3-05, 7-01, 2-06, 1-03, and 6-05) showed inhibitory activity of in vitro growth against 5 STEC strains (100%). Three strains (Lp 3-05, 2-06, and 1-03) showed inhibitory activity of in vitro growth against 10 ETEC (100%) and 5 STEC (100%) strains. The results of this study show the inhibitory activity of cell-free fermented culture broth of L. plantarum against ETEC and STEC isolated from postweaning pigs with colibacillosis and edema disease.

-7800. Greenway F. K. de Jonge L., Blanchard D., Frisard M., Smith S. R., Effect of dietary herbal supplement containing caffeine and ephedra on weight, metabolic rate, and body composition. Obesity Res., 2004, 12, 1152-1157. Grosso L. M., Bracken M. B., Caffeine metabolism, genetics, and perinatal outcomes: A review of exposure assessment considerations during pregnancy. Ann. Epidemiol., 2005, 15, 460-466. Gu Y., Hurst W. J., Stuart D. A., Lambert J. D., Inhibition of key digestive enzymes by cocoa extracts and procyanidins. J. Agric. Food Chem., 2011, 59, 5305-5311. Haller C

and pathology of Brucellosis in livestock. Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics). 32 (1): 105-115. https://doi.org/10.20506/rst.32.1.2193 PMid:23837369 37. Sperry, J.F., Robertson, D.C. (1975). Inhibition of Growth by Erythritol Catabolism in Brucella abortus. J. Bacteriol. 124 (1): 391-397. PMid:170249 PMCid:PMC235907

., 244: 55–61 [36] Van Bladeren, P. J., Ommen, B. V. (1991): The inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase(s): mechanisms, toxic consequences and therapeutic benefits. Pharmacol. Ther., 51, 35–46 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0163-7258(91)90040-S [37] Van Bladeren, P. J. (2000): Glutathione conjugation as bioactivation reaction. Chem. Biol. Interact., 129: 1–76 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0009-2797(00)00214-3 [38] Van Iersel, M. L., Ploemen, J. P., Struik, I., Van Amersfoort, C., Keyzer, A.E., Schefferlie, J. G., Van Bladeren, P. J. (1996): Inhibition of glutathione