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Technological preferences for teaching-learning a second language in Huichol communities and private high-schools in Mexico

Abstract

This research enquires about the Information and Communication Technologies preferences of students, teachers, and school principals in the teaching-learning process of a second language in 9th grade in two settings: Spanish for the Huichol people in a remote rural area and English for a private school in the city. The first case is situated in a rural Huichol community in the high mountain area of Jalisco, Mexico. The second one is located in a wealthy neighborhood in the Western Metropolitan area of Mexico City. A qualitative methodology with a heuristic and ethnographic design to investigate the reality of the daily use of technologies in both contexts for learning a second language. The instruments were the participant observation and in-depth interviews. Among the key findings are: (a) the participants tend to favor the use of technology for second language learning, (b) the bandwidth and the speed of the Internet is crucial to strengthen the immersion into the culture of a second language, (c) Educational communities support electronic enquiring, (d) there are similarities in the preferred search engines between the two populations, (e) the equity of education is hindered by school desertions, and (f) educational innovation requires that similar investigations take place to foster a full performance in the society of knowledge.

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African Literary Topoi in Modern African Texts and the Problematics of Europhone Forms

Abstract

This article treats selected oral poems whose topoi or motifs have transcended time and space to play out themselves in modern African fictions where colonial languages and their consequent habits of thought serve as media of enunciation. Thereafter, it beams attention on African scholars and writers who have attempted, presumably, to translate the oral medium of expression into indigenous and/or colonial written form(s) while maintaining the navel-strings that linked them, through the transfer of topoi and from the local and indigenous language to the Europhone form which, though, has led to international recognition, also serves to affirm a classic consequential illustration of the zero sum game

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Who Cares What We Speak: A Case Study at Kgoši Mampuru Correctional Facility

Abstract

The aim of this article is to explore the dynamic of language choice and language use as well as to examine the effect of language policy on language attitudes in the Department of Correctional Services (DCS) with special reference to Pretoria Central Prison, now called Kgoši Mampuru Correctional facility where there is some resistance to the use of English as the only official language of business.

A case study was conducted at this facility to find out the language attitudes of the participants towards English as the only official language of business. A questionnaire was used to evoke the participants’ attitudes and beliefs regarding the importance of the use of other official languages (indigenous languages which, like English, also have official status) in their daily lives. A total of 60 correctional services staff and 280 offenders took part in this research study. Interviews and observations were mainly carried out at the research site to triangulate the data. Only the findings from the 280 offenders will be reported in this article.

The findings of this research study show that the participants were keen to use their languages of choice and favoured the language functions of their indigenous languages. The findings suggest that the prevailing language attitudes were in contrast with the aims of language policy at DCS thus making the effect of language planning not to be realized.

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A Needs Assessment for Indigenous African Language-Based Programming Languages

Abstract

The development of an African native language-based programming language, using Yoruba as a case study, is envisioned. Programming languages based on the lexicons of indigenous African languages are rare to come by unlike those based on Asian and / or European languages. Availability of programming languages based on lexicons of African indigenous language would facilitate comprehension of problem-solving processes using computer by indigenous learners and teachers as confirmed by research results. In order to further assess the relevance, usefulness and needfulness of such a programming language, a preliminary needs assessment survey was carried out. The needs assessment was carried out through design of a structured questionnaire which was administered to 130 stakeholders in computer profession and computer education; including some staffers and learners of some primary, secondary and tertiary educational institutions in Oyo and Osun states of Nigeria, Africa. The responses to the questionnaire were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The analysis of the responses to the questionnaire shows that 89% of the respondents to the questionnaire expressed excitement and willingness to program or learn programming in their mother tongue-based programming language, if such a programming language is developed. This result shows the high degree of relevance, usefulness and needfulness of a native language-based programming language as well as the worthwhileness of embarking on development of such a programming language.

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Aspects Determining the Auto-identification of Native Communities in Contemporary Peru

Pueblos Indígenas . Lima: Grupo de Trabajo Racimos de Ungurahui. CHIRAPAQ (2017): ¿Es Útil Ser Indígena? Identidad, Censos y Políticas Públicas. Lima: CHIRAPAQ. CHIRAPAQ Centro de Culturas Indígenas del Peru: ¿ Que Puede Hacer el Perú para Enfrentar el Racismo?, 2015 [online]. Culturas y Derechos Indígenas [cit. 24/02/2018]. Available on: ˂ http://chirapaq.org.pe/es/que-puede-hacer-el-peru-para-enfrentar-el-racismo ˃. CULTURAL SURVIVAL: Peru Oficially Recognizes Indigenous Languages , 2017 [online]. Cultural Survival. [cit. 30/12/2017]. Available

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Selected semitransitive constructions in Algonquian

alignment: inverse systems in indigenous languages of the Americas. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

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Notes and Reviews. The Concept of Work in Yupik Eskimo Society Before and After the Russian Influx: A Linguist’s Perspective

. - RIA Novosti. http://ria.ru/infografika/20111220/521538199.html (accessed March 17, 2017). [Итоги Всероссийской переписи населения-2010. - РИА Новости. http://ria.ru/infografika/20111220/521538199.html.] de Reuse, Willem Joseph. 1994. Siberian Yupik Eskimo. The Language and Its Contacts with Chukchi. Studies in Indigenous Languages of the Americas. Salt Lake City, UT: University of Utah Press. de Reuse, Willem Joseph. 2006. Polysynthetic Language: Central Siberian Yupik. - Encyclopedia of Language & Linguistics 9. 2nd edn, edited by

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The Spanish Verbs Estar (To Be) and Ser (To Be) in Child-Directed Speech

., & Gumiel, S. (Eds.) (2015). New perspectives in the study of ser and estar . Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Ponce-Romero, X. T. (2008). La adquisición temprana de los verbos ser y estar en español . Mexico City: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Retrieved from http://132.248.9.195/ptd2009/enero/0638964/Index.html Pye, C., Pfeiler, B, de León, L., Brown, P., & Mateo, P. (2007). A comparative study of Mayan children’s early verb forms. In B. Pfeiler (Ed.), Learning indigenous languages (pp. 15–46). Hannover: Verlag für Ethnologie. Real Academia

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Linguistic Diversity, Language Rights And Language Ecology

(pp. 1–50). Washington, D.C.: The Smithsonian Institute Press. Maffi, L. (2005). Linguistic, Cultural, and Biological Diversity. Annual Review of Anthropology , 34, 599–617. Maffi, L. &Woodley, E. (eds) (2010). Biocultural Diversity Conservation: A Global Sourcebook . London: Earthscan. Magga, O. H., Nicolaisen, I., Trask, M., Dunbar, R. &Skutnabb-Kangas, T. (2005). Indigenous Children’s Education and Indigenous Languages . Expert paper written for the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. New York: United Nations. Skutnabb

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Remaking, reweaving and indigenizing curriculum: Lessons from an American Samoa Head Start program

Years , 28(2), 183-196. Li, H., Wang, X. C., & Wong, J. M. S. (2011). Early childhood curriculum reform in China: Perspectives from examining teachers’ beliefs and practices in Chinese literacy teaching. Chinese Education & Society , 44(6), 5-23. McCarty, T. L., & Zepeda, O. (1995). Indigenous language education and literacy: Introduction to the theme issue. Bilingual Research Journal , 19(1), 1-4. Moll, L. C., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms

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